North To Alaska (1960)

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    There are 99 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • North To Alaska (1960)

      NORTH TO ALASKA

      DIRECTED BY HENRY HATHAWAY
      PRODUCED BY HENRY HATHAWAY/ CHARLES K. FELDMAN/ JOHN LEE MAHIN
      MUSIC BY LEONARD NEWMAN
      20th.CENTURY FOX


      Photo with the courtesy of lasbugas
      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Sam (John Wayne) and George (Stewart Granger) strike gold in Alaska.
      George sends Sam to Seattle to bring George's fiance back to Alaska.
      Sam finds she is already married,
      and returns instead with Angel (Capucine).
      Sam, after trying to get George and Angel together,
      finally romances Angel, who, in the meantime, is busy
      fighting off the advances of George's younger brother, Billy (Fabian).
      Frankie (Ernie Kovacs) is a con man trying to steal the partner's gold claim.

      Full Cast
      John Wayne .... Sam McCord
      Stewart Granger .... George Pratt
      Ernie Kovacs .... Frankie Canon
      Fabian .... Billy Pratt
      Capucine .... Michelle ('Angel')
      Mickey Shaughnessy .... Peter Boggs
      Karl Swenson .... Lars Nordquist
      Joe Sawyer .... Land Commissioner
      Kathleen Freeman .... Lena Nordquist
      John Qualen .... Logger
      Stanley Adams .... Breezy
      Mark Bailey .... Norseman Logger (uncredited)
      Rayford Barnes .... Gold buyer (uncredited)
      Oscar Beregi Jr. .... Captain (uncredited)
      Peter Bourne .... Olaf (uncredited)
      Alan Carney .... Bartender (uncredited)
      Lilyan Chauvin .... Jenny Lamont (uncredited)
      Richard Collier .... Skinny Sourdough (uncredited)
      Stephen Courtleigh .... Duggan (uncredited)
      Esther Dale .... Woman at picnic (uncredited)
      Maurice Dallimore .... Bartender (uncredited)
      Richard Deacon .... Angus, hotel desk clerk (uncredited)
      Douglas Dick .... Lieutenant (uncredited)
      Tom Dillon .... Barber (uncredited)
      Joey Faye .... Sourdough (uncredited)
      Frank Faylen .... Arnie (uncredited)
      Fortune Gordien .... Logger (uncredited)
      Sol Gorss .... Gunman at Arnie's Claim (uncredited)
      James Griffith .... Salvation Army leader (uncredited)
      Arlene Harris .... Queen Lil (uncredited)
      Max Hellinger .... Everett 'Bish' Bishop, the waiter (uncredited)
      Marcel Hillaire .... Jenny's husband ('butler') (uncredited)
      Roy Jenson .... Ole, Logger punched by Sam (uncredited)
      Johnny Lee .... Coachman (uncredited)
      Paul Maxey .... Nome Townsman (uncredited)
      Kermit Maynard .... Townfolk (uncredited)
      Jerry O'Sullivan .... Sergeant (uncredited)
      Ollie O'Toole .... Mack (uncredited)
      Tudor Owen .... Purser (uncredited)
      Pamela Raymond .... Dancer (uncredited)
      Charles Seel .... Gold buyer (uncredited)
      Patty Wharton .... Dancer (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      John H. Kafka (idea)
      Ladislas Fodor (play Birthday Gift) (as Laszlo Fodor)
      John Lee Mahin (screenplay) and
      Martin Rackin (screenplay) and
      Claude Binyon (screenplay)
      Ben Hecht uncredited and
      Wendell Mayes uncredited

      Original Music
      Russell Faith (song "If You Knew")
      Lionel Newman

      Cinematography
      Leon Shamroy (director of photography)

      Stunts
      Fred Graham .... stunt double: John Wayne (uncredited)
      John Epper .... stunts (uncredited)
      Sol Gorss .... stunts (uncredited)
      Tom Hennesy .... stunts (uncredited)
      Loren Janes .... stunts (uncredited)
      Roy Jenson .... stunts (uncredited)
      Kermit Maynard .... stunts (uncredited)
      Bob Morgan .... stunts (uncredited)
      Boyd 'Red' Morgan .... stunts (uncredited)
      Harvey Parry .... stunts (uncredited)
      Jack Perkins .... stunts (uncredited)
      George Robotham .... stunts (uncredited)
      Richard Talmadge .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)

      Trivia
      Years after the production was first shown in public, the producers of the film admitted that, in the scene where Capucine is trying to laugh, she was actually tickled on her feet and that her laughs and pleas for mercy were entirely genuine.

      Richard Fleischer was originally hired to direct the picture. He accepted, but when he asked to see the script he was informed that one hadn't been written yet. Also, after talking with Capucine, he thought she was all wrong for the role of the prostitute - he didn't think she was sexy or earthy enough to convince anyone that she was a hooker, and he informed producer Charles K. Feldman of his conclusion and asked that she be replaced. Unfortunately for Fleischer, Feldman and Capucine were living together at the time, and he had already promised her the role. So Capucine got the part and Fleischer got the boot. He was replaced by Henry Hathaway.

      Goofs
      * Revealing mistakes: Sam McCord's hair flies off with the first punch of his fight with Frankie Canon.

      * Continuity: Inside the cabin, Sam hasn't quite finished buttoning Michelle's blouse when George enters. Later, the blouse appears completely buttoned.

      * Continuity: When Billy Pratt and Angel are having dinner, Billy opens a bottle of champagne that sprays out and douses one of the candles on the table. In the very next shot, Billy has his hand over the mouth of the bottle to stop the spray and the candle is lit. The candle is then out again, then lit again, then out a third time in following shots.

      * Continuity: In the major fight, Frankie Canon is knocked face-down into fairly deep mud. Seconds later he is shown "pre-fight clean" and then somewhat muddied shortly thereafter (but, even then, not as muddy as he should be).

      * Audio/visual unsynchronized: When the cavalry come to impound the mine and the Duke is about to ride off with his share of the gold, the trooper has the correct Trapdoor Springfield carbine, but the cocking noise is that of a lever action Winchester. The Springfield had a side hammer and makes a click-click noise, while the Winchester makes a shook-shook noise.

      * Revealing mistakes: In the scene when Sam McCord (John Wayne) and George Pratt (Stewart Granger) are coming out of the Palace escorting Peter Boggs to the Land Commissioner, Frankie pulls up in a wagon to race into the Palace to get Peter Boggs. When the fight starts and Frankie hits John Wayne, Wayne stumbles back. As he stumbles, he loses his cowboy hat. When his hat comes off, so does his toupee. As he turns around and you can see the bald spots on the top and back of his head.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, California, USA
      Big Bear Lake, Big Bear Valley, San Bernardino National Forest, California, USA
      Mammoth Lakes, California, USA
      Point Mugu, California, USA
      (beach and exterior town scenes)
      Yukon Territory, Canada

      Watch this Trailer

      [extendedmedia]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhZeTaaus2Y[/extendedmedia]
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 7 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • North to Alaska is a 1960 comedic Western movie
      directed by Henry Hathaway and John Wayne (uncredited).
      The picture stars Wayne along with Stewart Granger, Ernie Kovacs, Fabian and Capucine.
      The script is based on the play Birthday Gift by Ladislas Fodor and set in Nome, 1900.
      The movie featured Johnny Horton's song of the same name, sung during the opening titles.

      North To Alaska, is a very personal favourite of mine,
      because this was the very first major Duke film I saw on the big screen,
      WOW!!! it was an amazing experience.
      OK , I had sat as a child through endless Saturday matinees of
      The Three Mesquiteersand the other Poverty Row movies,
      but , here he was, in glorious Technicolor, 12 feet tall, right, in front of me!!

      This film was part of the 3 picture deal, Duke had signed with 20th. Century Fox,
      and Duke was eager to get back to work.
      He was at this time, following The Alamo,
      facing serious financial problems.

      Henry Hathaway, was put in charge, with Duke to head the cast.
      Duke played a robust part, and handled the comedic role well.
      Stewart Grainger, however, was trying to keep afloat his flagging career,
      and found the whole episode, a nightmare regularly fluffing his lines,
      and finding Hathaway intimidating an bullying,

      Duke's, Graingers and Fabian's love interest,
      was beautiful French actress, Capucine with limited ability,
      and playing opposite Duke, was an important career move.

      Fabian, who was a one-hit-wonder, was really a one-hit film star, after this effort!!
      Critics thought the film was uneven, and the reviews were tepid.

      However, the mass brawls, which were handled in a rollicking,
      silent picture style, with action for laughs, were to set the patter for some of Duke's later films.
      I love this film, and I don't care what they say!!!!!

      User Review
      My favorite movie of all time!
      5 May 2002 | by Capucine (Connecticut, USA)

      This movie is too funny! And too heartwarming! I can watch this movie over and over and still laugh! And it is not slapstick! Just good ole wholesome American comedy! My favorite! Three men, (well, two men and a teen) and a French woman! What a combo!! John Wayne is his usual macho self. That is always fun to watch. And Stewart Granger is soooo good here! I have seen him in many things, but I think he out-did himself here! He's too funny! And poor Fabian. He breaks my heart with his love-sick adoration of Michelle! If you haven't seen this, you must rent it. You will be glad you did. And you WILL end up watching it again. It's that type of movie
      .
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 3 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Originally posted by ethanedwards@Feb 3 2006, 02:28 AM
      I love this film, and I don't care what they say!!!!!
      [snapback]26400[/snapback]

      Now you're talking, Keith! :lol:

      We love this film, too, and put it with McLintock! and Donovan's Reef as another light, fun movie with the Duke.

      I particularly like the lumberjack party and in particular, the tree climbing contest. The Mrs. enjoyed Capucine as the female lead in this movie.

      Amazon is the winner on the film, as it has it available, and for under $10. The film is listed on Deep Discount, but for a couple of dollars more than Amazon.

      Chester :newyear:

      The post was edited 1 time, last by chester7777: update links ().

    • I just watched this film today, and it continues to be one of my favorite Duke pictures. It is fun from start to finish. The loggers picnic scenes are my favorite. I love the Johnny Horton sung theme song, I think I could do with out the Fabian song though. I always though he was lousy. With likes of Elvis, Ricky Nelson, Jerry Lee Lewis and Eddie Cochran, all of whom were handsome, Popular, teen heart trobs at that time and all could really sing! How did Fabian get a recording contract, but more importantly, who did he know to get cast in this movie????????? :huh:
    • (Editted 6/21/2012)
      What a difference almost 6 years can make! DeepDiscountDVD has it now, for $8.84, and Amazon has it for $6.97.

      We haven't looked for it at other locations like K-Mart, but it might be worth checking.

      As we've said before, we really enjoy this movie, but we'll have to bring it out and watch it again, this weekend, and see if we have any fresh insights to share.

      Chester :newyear:

      The post was edited 1 time, last by chester7777: update prices ().

    • Originally posted by chester7777@Oct 13 2006, 12:36 AM
      What a difference 8 months can make!  DeepDiscountDVD has it now, for $10.33, and Amazon has it for $12.99.

      We haven't looked for it at other locations like K-Mart, but it might be worth checking.

      As we've said before, we really enjoy this movie, but we'll have to bring it out and watch it again, this weekend, and see if we have any fresh insights to share.

      Chester :newyear:
      [snapback]35831[/snapback]


      Hi Chester. Just to let you know, Wal-Mart has "North to Alaska" packaged with "The Undefeated" in their spotlight series doulbe feature set for $9.97. Check your local store they have been a wealth of JW films to help build my collection, with out depleteing my wallet :D. Don't forget to look in the $5.50 bin. I got a buch out of there as well. An added plus to this is NO SHIPPING CHARGES! :jump:
    • Keith, I've got to take a little issue with you on the ice and snow in Alaska. The weather there is not always snowy. they have been known to have very mild temperatures quite often. This time of year, Juneau and Ketchkikan are usually in the upper 40's-lower 50's and in summer it can get into the 70's. So, depending on the time of the year, it's quite conceivable that the weather could've been mild enough to not wear coats. Just thought I'd point that out. Not trying to be critical.
    • Hi WaynamoJim,

      Errors in geography: Obviously not filmed in Alaska. No snow or ice anywhere,
      everyone is comfortable without coats, and there is sage brush growing at Sam and George's mine.


      Thanks for your reply.
      Like most films, of the era, it is assumed
      that all, was not what they wanted us to believe,
      and North To Alaska, was no exception.
      Whilst, I take your point about the weather
      in Alaska, the cast and crew,
      went on location in the spring of 1960,
      and filming took place at Point Mugu, in California!
      a place 200 miles north of LA
      The creek that was used,was in fact,
      fed by the waters of Mount Whitney,
      which as you know, is a peak, in the
      Southern Sierra Nevada Range,
      in eastern California.

      Incidently, many thanks for all, the posts
      and comments you've contributed to the Movie Reviews.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England
    • Originally posted by WaynamoJim+Oct 13 2006, 06:01 PM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(WaynamoJim @ Oct 13 2006, 06:01 PM)</div>
      . . . depending on the time of the year, it's quite conceivable that the weather could've been mild enough to not wear coats.
      [snapback]35875[/snapback]
      [/b]


      <!--QuoteBegin-ethanedwards
      @Oct 14 2006, 12:44 AM
      Like most films, of the era, it is assumed
      that all, was not what they wanted us to believe, and[b] North To Alaska
      , was no exception.

      Whilst, I take your point about the weather in Alaska, the cast and crew, went on location in the spring of  1960, and filming took place at Point Mugu, in California!

      The creek that was used,was in fact, fed by the waters of Mount Whitney, which as you know, is a peak, in the Southern Sierra Nevada Range, in eastern California.
      [snapback]35877[/snapback]
      [/b]

      Most older movies were not shot on location, like they are nowadays. Most were shot in various places in California. California is very versatile, in that it has many terrains within a day's drive of each other - mountains, desert, ocean, redwood forests, etc. You can be snow-skiing early in the morning, and water-skiing in the afternoon of the same day around here, or even surfing in the ocean. Snow and surf are literally a few hours apart, and truly can be accessed in the same day.

      I never had a problem with the apparent location in this film - it seemed within the realm of believability. Certainly a very enjoyable film - which makes other possibly distracting factors easy to overlook - at least for me :lol: .

      Chester :newyear:
    • Hi Jim,

      I agree with you.
      I love this film, and it was the first ever
      Duke film, I saw at the theatre.
      So it's extra special to me.
      I couldn't care where it was filmed,
      as the location was of no significance to me,
      whether there was snow ,or ice, or not!!!!
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England