Hondo (1954)

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    There are 169 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Paula wrote:

      Reviews of the Hondo Blu-ray, with lots of pics. ;)

      dvdbeaver.com/film/dvdreviews18/hondo_dvd_review.htm

      blu-ray.com/movies/Hondo-Blu-ray/37009/#Review (make sure to click on the "screenshots" button at this review -- 30 frame grabs from the Blu-ray will display)


      Hi Paula,

      you've raised the bar once again on your info gathering!

      I really hope my copy of Hondo is by the front door when I get home so I can enjoy it over the weekend!
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Here's an interview with Gretchen Wayne (Michael's widow) about the new Blu-ray of Hondo. She also discusses True Grit (old and new) and other titles she'd like to see on Blu-ray.

      hometheaterforum.com/t/321298/…-blu-ray-release-of-hondo
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Paula wrote:

      Here's an interview with Gretchen Wayne (Michael's widow) about the new Blu-ray of Hondo. She also discusses True Grit (old and new) and other titles she'd like to see on Blu-ray.

      hometheaterforum.com/t/321298/…-blu-ray-release-of-hondo


      Very good interview, Paula, Thank You for bring it here for us to read.

      Chester :newyear:
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Paula wrote:

      Here's an interview with Gretchen Wayne (Michael's widow) about the new Blu-ray of Hondo. She also discusses True Grit (old and new) and other titles she'd like to see on Blu-ray.

      hometheaterforum.com/t/321298/…-blu-ray-release-of-hondo


      Thank you for this Paula,
      I have also copied it to
      Duke's Daughter-In-Law- Gretchen Wayne
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      I just viewed the movie on Blu-ray. Let me first say that it was really great on that format. It was just great to see this movie again, and the picture quality was breath-taking. And the sound was wonderful.

      Now for the not so good news. The movie is in widescreen format. What they did and I assume it was Paramount Pictures since they distributed the movie. Instead of adding more of the picture in panoramic view, the actually cut the top and bottom of the screen in the aspect they wanted for the widescreen. It this movie was actually done in wide screen or not, is another story. I, of course not around when the movie was released in 1953, so I do not have a personal reference as to what was shone back then.

      I do have the VHS and DVD copy of the movie. I did not watch those formats last night, but I was under the impression that this movie was going to put back into its original format that was shone at the threater back in 1953. When indeed it was not. I saw a review that they showed an earlier screen shot of the movie (either in DVD or VHS) and the Blu-ray version where the top and bottom were cut to give the impression of the widescreen format.

      Very disappointing in my opinion. I kinda feel robbed that they cut a part of the movie out for my viewing. But again, it was great to see this movie. I think in the near future they will put it in 3D, so I hope they either find that true widescreen version or put it back it on VHS/DVD.

      Cheers :cool: Hondo
      [IMG:http://www.jwaynefan.com/images/gallery/libvalance.jpg]

      "When you come slam bang up against trouble, it never looks half as bad if you face up to it"
      - John Wayne quote
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Now for the not so good news. The movie is in widescreen format.


      Hondo was filmed and composed for widescreen and shown that way in theaters, though it was protected for 1:37 Academy ratio for smaller theaters that hadn't yet made the changeover to wider screen. When it showed up on TV and on standard DVD, it was shown in 1:37, which is how people are used to seeing it, unless they saw it in 1:85 back in the early 50s.

      There is a bit more information now ADDED to the sides of the film in its Blu-ray widescreen version. Opening the matte for a fullscreen version cuts a little off on the sides -- that little bit is now restored -- or almost all restored, as apparently this Blu-ray is 1:78 rather than 1:85. But still... there is more information on the sides than in the fullscreen version.

      Although it is 1:78 rather than 1:85, the new Blu-ray is much closer to the way we're supposed to see it than the fullscreen version -- though without the 3D.

      This is from an article about Hondo by Bob Furmanek, a film historian who has conducted extensive research into the changeover of 1:37 Academy ratio to the various widescreen formats in the early 1950s, and also 3D:

      "On May 19, Jack Warner announced the new All-Media Camera, a camera designed to shoot in any format-- black and white or color, 3-D and/or widescreen, or flat. The rig was designed and built by the studios camera department, and would be utilized for the first time on HONDO. Cinematographers Robert Burks and Archie Stout would be shooting on location, in 3-D and widescreen. Films shot with the All-Media rig were composed for the aspect ratio of 1.85:1."

      Here is a link to the entire article:

      3dfilmarchive.com/home/hondo-3-d-release

      Here are comparison shots of the DVD and the Blu-ray. Note that there is more information on the sides and see how much closer the widescreen version puts you to the actor on screen? It's a much more interesting shot this way -- there is too much sky in the fullscreen version and in the widescreen version you're closer to Page, she's positioned more correctly in the frame, and she seems much more part of the landscape. It's a far more dramatic composition in the widescreen version. And you do see more of the landscape since there is a bit more info on the sides.

      [IMG:http://i742.photobucket.com/albums/xx61/pvitari/aJohnFarrowHondoJohnWayneDVDReviewPDVD_016.jpg]

      [IMG:http://i742.photobucket.com/albums/xx61/pvitari/940_hondo_blu-ray_5_.jpg]

      The post was edited 4 times, last by Paula ().

    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Aspect ratios are always something of interest to me. :)

      Now if Hondo had been shot in an anamorphic process, like Cinemascope or Panavision, then a fullscreen version would not result from opening the mattes, but from cutting off about a third of the picture from each side, resulting in the viewer seeing only the center third. While I'm not a fan of open mattes, as I think they can wreak havoc with composition, pan and scan is far far worse. However, Hondo in full screen is not pan and scan, it's open matte, so you're basically getting more rather than less. Though with open matte, more is not necessarily a good thing. ;)

      MGM has been releasing a lot of 50s films which were shot flat in open matte, because they can't be bothered to spend the money to do a new widescreen transfer from whatever original elements they have. Because of this policy, I haven't bought quite a few titles I would have otherwise been interested in. But they do release anamorphic shot films in widescreen, thank goodness.
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Paula wrote:

      Aspect ratios are always something of interest to me. :)

      Now if Hondo had been shot in an anamorphic process, like Cinemascope or Panavision, then a fullscreen version would not result from opening the mattes, but from cutting off about a third of the picture from each side, resulting in the viewer seeing only the center third. While I'm not a fan of open mattes, as I think they can wreak havoc with composition, pan and scan is far far worse. However, Hondo in full screen is not pan and scan, it's open matte, so you're basically getting more rather than less. Though with open matte, more is not necessarily a good thing. ;)

      MGM has been releasing a lot of 50s films which were shot flat in open matte, because they can't be bothered to spend the money to do a new widescreen transfer from whatever original elements they have. Because of this policy, I haven't bought quite a few titles I would have otherwise been interested in. But they do release anamorphic shot films in widescreen, thank goodness.


      Paula,
      I have to ask, sorry if you've said before, but what is your background?
      Your posts have been fascinating and hugely informative for me, and everyone else I'm sure, and being somewhat of a cinephile you talk about the aspects, pun intended, that really interest me.
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Dooley, I work in a job that has nothing to do with film and in fact -- I've never even taken a film course! I am just a hardcore film buff who is interested in the technical aspects of films and have educated myself -- a little bit. Which means, I know a bit more than the average person on the street but very, very little compared to the professional film historians and filmmakers. Thanks to the internet, I can find the experts' posts and read up on whatever question I may have so if I post something myself, I am pretty sure I'm being accurate. If I'm not sure, I will say so or just not post. There are also many books available that the layperson can read to learn about the technical side of filmmaking. I am very grateful that folks like Bob Furmanek contribute online and have web pages which are a great help to the amateur film lovers like myself, and also for all the authors out there whose books have been so helpful. ;)

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Paula ().

    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Paula, that's as good a description of how 1.85:1 widescreen works as I've ever read. Good job!

      It's interesting in Hondo how with some of the landscape cropped from the full-frame shots, we actually notice those landscapes more! It's quite obvious that the picture was composed to be seen this way.
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Paula wrote:

      Dooley, I work in a job that has nothing to do with film and in fact -- I've never even taken a film course! I am just a hardcore film buff who is interested in the technical aspects of films and have educated myself -- a little bit. Which means, I know a bit more than the average person on the street but very, very little compared to the professional film historians and filmmakers. Thanks to the internet, I can find the experts' posts and read up on whatever question I may have so if I post something myself, I am pretty sure I'm being accurate. If I'm not sure, I will say so or just not post. There are also many books available that the layperson can read to learn about the technical side of filmmaking. I am very grateful that folks like Bob Furmanek contribute online and have web pages which are a great help to the amateur film lovers like myself, and also for all the authors out there whose books have been so helpful. ;)


      Hi Paula, thanks for the info, glad to hear there are others out there who are hardcore film buffs!
      I too read a huge amount on behind the scenes and often discover films I've never heard of in the process.
      I haven't quite got into sourcing stuff on the Internet, this being the first forum I've actually joined and interacted on.
      Keep up the interesting posts, you have an eager audience on here!
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Dear friends,

      I just recently heard about this site and wanted to join and say hello. It looks like a great place to discuss Mr. Wayne and his incredible body of work.

      I appreciate many of the nice comments about my 3-D research and restoration efforts. Thank you for all of the kind words.

      I hadn't realized this before but it's an interesting bit of trivia: HONDO was Warner Bros. first widescreen movie!

      Warner Bros. had pretty shut down the studio in April of 1953 for a period of evaluation and testing with 3-D and widescreen. Jack Warner announced the studios all-widescreen policy on May 7, 1953. The All-Media camera rig was first shown to the trades on May 19 and HONDO began filming on location in Mexico on June 11.

      Work finally commenced on the lot on July 14 after a three month hiatus. The first feature to begin production in Burbank was THE BOUNTY HUNTER in 3-D and 1.75:1.

      If you'd like more information on the dawn of widescreen, please visit the 3-D Myths page on our website. There's a link to another page with additional widescreen data. I hope you find it interesting! 3dfilmarchive.com/home/top-10-3-d-myths

      Thanks again for your kindness.

      Best,
      Bob Furmanek
      3-D Film Archive, LLC
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Bob Furmanek wrote:

      Dear friends,

      I just recently heard about this site and wanted to join and say hello. It looks like a great place to discuss Mr. Wayne and his incredible body of work.

      I appreciate many of the nice comments about my 3-D research and restoration efforts. Thank you for all of the kind words.

      I hadn't realized this before but it's an interesting bit of trivia: HONDO was Warner Bros. first widescreen movie!

      Warner Bros. had pretty shut down the studio in April of 1953 for a period of evaluation and testing with 3-D and widescreen. Jack Warner announced the studios all-widescreen policy on May 7, 1953. The All-Media camera rig was first shown to the trades on May 19 and HONDO began filming on location in Mexico on June 11.

      Work finally commenced on the lot on July 14 after a three month hiatus. The first feature to begin production in Burbank was THE BOUNTY HUNTER in 3-D and 1.75:1.

      If you'd like more information on the dawn of widescreen, please visit the 3-D Myths page on our website. There's a link to another page with additional widescreen data. I hope you find it interesting! 3dfilmarchive.com/home/top-10-3-d-myths

      Thanks again for your kindness.

      Best,
      Bob Furmanek
      3-D Film Archive, LLC


      First of all, welcome Bob to this message board. We are so happy to have you here and hope you will explore all we have here. And thanks for the information on 3D. That was also interesting. I will be sure to read more later.

      I am about to walk out, but just wanted to say, "Howdy." You bring a lot here and we look forward to learning more soon.

      Cheers :cool: Hondo Duke Lane or just Hondo
      [IMG:http://www.jwaynefan.com/images/gallery/libvalance.jpg]

      "When you come slam bang up against trouble, it never looks half as bad if you face up to it"
      - John Wayne quote
    • Re: Hondo (1954)

      Wow, so great that Bob Furmanek is here!

      Now if only they'd re-release the 3-D version of Hondo into theaters. I've sworn off 3-D for live action movies (sorry, Bob) but I'd break my vow for Hondo.