7th Cavalry (1956)

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    There are 4 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • 7th Cavalry (1956)

      7th CAVALRY

      DIRECTED BY JOSEPH H. LEWIS
      PRODUCED BY HARRY JOE BROWN/RANDOLPH SCOTT
      A SCOTT-BROWN PRODUCTION
      PRODUCERS-ACTORS CORPORATION
      COLUMBIA PICTURES CORPORATION


      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Returning to Fort Lincoln, Captain Benson learns of Custer's defeat at the Little Big Horn. At the inquiry as Custer's Officers blame Custer for the defeat, Benson tries to defend him. But Benson was suspiciously absent at the time of the battle and is now despised by the troops. So when an order to retrieve the bodies from the battlefield arrives, Benson volunteers for the dangerous mission of returning back into Indian territory.
      Written by Maurice VanAuken

      Cast
      Randolph Scott ... Capt. Tom Benson
      Barbara Hale ... Martha Kellogg
      Jay C. Flippen ... Sgt. Bates
      Frank Faylen ... Sgt. Kruger
      Jeanette Nolan ... Charlotte Reynolds
      Leo Gordon ... Vogel
      Denver Pyle ... Dixon
      Harry Carey Jr. ... Cpl. Morrison
      Michael Pate ... Capt. Benteen
      Donald Curtis ... Lt. Bob Fitch
      Frank Wilcox ... Maj. Reno
      Pat Hogan ... Young Hawk
      Russell Hicks ... Col. Kellogg
      Peter Ortiz ... Pollock
      and many more...

      Directed
      Joseph H. Lewis

      Writing Credits
      Peter Packer ... (screenplay)
      Glendon Swarthout ... (based on a story by) (as Glendon F. Swarthout)

      Produced
      Harry Joe Brown ... producer
      Randolph Scott ... associate producer

      Music
      Mischa Bakaleinikoff ... (uncredited)

      Cinematography
      Ray Rennahan ... director of photography

      Trivia
      Filmed in Mexico

      Crazy Credits
      Opening credits: Capt. Benson was returning with his future bride,
      to his post commanded by the gallant Indian fighter Colonel Custer, who had prepared the famous 7th for all out war with the Sioux.

      Goofs
      Character error
      After doing some online searching I found that Captain Tom Benson was a fictional character of what could've happened, surprised no one mention that.

      Continuity
      After killing the Indian ,Denver Pyle's trooper holsters his rifle twice .

      At abt. 44m.,Scott knocks an Indian from his horse. As they are rolling on the ground, he (the stuntman) has his hat on securely. In the following action, he is hatless.

      If you keep a close eye on Captain Benson (Randolph Scott) and soldier Vogel (Leo Gordon) during their fight, there's a brief moment when Vogel has a fresh looking face when only a second before and after it was sweat and dust covered.

      Factual errors
      As Corporal Morrison (Harry Carey Jr.) saddles "Dandy", LT Col Custer's second mount, he puts on an English saddle. US Calvary adopted "McClellan" saddles which remained in service through World War II. This was the wrong saddle for the movie.

      When the troops present arms at the flag-raising at the beginning of the film, the soldier closest to the camera has a Remington Rolling-Block rifle, probably standing in for a Springfield Trapdoor carbine, with which the cavalry of 1876 was actually equipped. The Remington, though popular with the armies of many other nations, was never adopted in any form by the US military.

      The flag lowered at the end of the movie has 35 stars in a rectangular 5x7 pattern. The Battle of Little Bighorn took place in 1876, when the US flag actually had 37 stars.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Amecameca, Estado de México, Mexico

      Watch the Movie

      [extendedmedia]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vQp6S46P7g[/extendedmedia]
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ethanedwards ().

    • 7th Cavalry is a 1956 American Technicolor Western film directed by
      Joseph H. Lewis based on a story, "A Horse for Mrs. Custer," by Glendon Swarthout
      set after the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

      Filmed in Mexico, the picture stars Randolph Scott and Barbara Hale.

      Besides Randolph Scott,
      look out for other Duke 'Pals'
      Jay C. Flippen, Harry Carey Jr.
      Leo Gordon, Denver Pyle, Russell Hicks

      7th-cavalry-randolph-scott-classic-western-dvd-20.gif

      User Review

      It plays a bit fast and loose with history, but it is entertaining.
      26 January 2014 | by planktonrules (Bradenton, Florida)

      plankton wrote:

      The film is not based 100% on real history--which is VERY typical of most westerns. Benson and his mission is entirely fictional. However, one thing that isn't is that some officers, rightfully, questioned the competence of General Custer. He was, according to most historians, an incompetent who made many serious blunders due to his own hubris. So, when the soldiers openly question his decisions that led to the battle, that is pretty much fact--despite Benson defending his commander's decisions."7th Cavalry" picks up just after General Custer and his command is wiped out at the Battle of Little Big Horn.


      Captain Benson (Randolph Scott) was away on personal leave, so he somehow missed out on the massacre. However, folks are looking for a scapegoat and folks second-guess Benson and brand him a coward. Not wanting to live with disgrace, he volunteers to do an insanely difficult duty--to go into Indian territory and bury the Cavalry's dead. Oddly, instead of taking competent soldiers, he takes the scum of the regiment--guys who DID survive due to their own cowardice. Can these guys somehow redeem themselves?

      So is it any good? Well, I gave the film an 8. This is mostly because they acting is very nice and compared to other films of the genre from this age, it stands well above most due to very nice acting and an interesting what if scenario.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England