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  • The Train Robbers (1973)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1970's

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    Quote: “Originally posted by dc65@Sep 14 2006, 09:45 AM My favourite line was when the Duke tells Ann-Margret  that he has saddles older than her. If that isn't a great, truthful line, then I don't know what is. [snapback]34467[/snapback] ” Yeah, at least is displays some refreshing honesty about Hollywood's age conventions.

  • El Dorado (1967)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1960's

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    Quote: “Originally posted by Robbie@Aug 23 2006, 04:16 PM Hi Joe Surely this was the point of El Dorado, when Leone was catering for a certain audiences with his portrayal of gritty violence, Hawks was offering a refreshing alternative. A movie that includes violence but in a more lightweight manner this is something which many people craved due to the cold war, vietnam or even the spagetti westerns and thats one reason why El dorado is so popular even in 2006. Robbie [snapback]33846[/snapback] …

  • El Dorado (1967)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1960's

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    ***SPOILERS*** for El Dorado I don't think that El Dorado (1967) is a terribly substantial film or a significant Western in the history of the genre. The movie is obviously derivative of director Howard Hawks' previous Western with John Wayne, Rio Bravo (1959), and its treatment of violence is lightweight, lacking the gravity of Hawks' austere and often grave Red River (1948). Surely, certain thematic explorations about the flippant resort to violence in the Old West and the mercenary nature of …

  • Quote: “Originally posted by Jay J. Foraker@Aug 18 2006, 03:17 PM Welcome joekiddlouischama - I would agree that "Bloodwork" was actually a pretty good movie.  I'm glad you pointed out the noir aspects of the film - looking back, I would have to agree also. Hope you join us often. Cheers - Jay [snapback]33696[/snapback] ” Thanks, Jay. And, yeah, I think that Bloodwork could be described as an "old man's noir."

  • Quote: “Originally posted by Colorado Bob@Aug 17 2006, 10:00 PM Hello JoeKiddLouisChama (what a screen name! You must be a Clint Eastwood / John Saxon fan). Just thought I'd say howdy and welcome to the message board. We're glad to have ya! Best, Colorado Bob [snapback]33679[/snapback] ” Thanks, I'm glad to be here.

  • The Dead Pool (Buddy Van Horn, 1988) didn't flop, but it was a much smaller hit than the previous Dirty Harry movies, which had all finished in the top-ten. The Dead Pool, by contrast, finished at a solid but unspectacular 30th in domestic grosses among 1988's theatrical releases: boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?yr=1988&p=.htm And, yes, The Dead Pool fared much better than Bloodwork, which ranks 94th among 2002's releases in domestic gross: boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?yr=2002&p=.htm Although…

  • McQueen didn't do much work in Westerns, unless you throw in his television series. Really, Paul Newman boasts a much more significant presence in Westerns (he starred in six compared to McQueen's three), as does Charles Bronson. Jimmy Stewart definitely deserves more recognition. In the 1950s, under the direction of Anthony Mann, he emerged as one of the Western's greatest stars.

  • Robert Donner

    joekiddlouischama - - Off Topic Discussions

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    Donner played the venal, hypocritical town preacher in High Plains Drifter (Clint Eastwood, 1973) memorably.

  • True Grit (1969)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1960's

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    I didn't care for Campbell and Darby, both of whom I found grating, but True Grit's last act is thrilling. The pace quickens, the physical action comes to life, and Hathaway's direction is engaged. I don't see it as a great Western, but the pay-off is satisfying, the locations are seasonally sparkling, and the film is historically notable for giving Wayne his only Oscar.

  • The Undefeated (1969)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1960's

    Post

    Quote: “Originally posted by DukePilgrim@Jan 20 2006, 05:29 PM I always thought this movie was so so. It was the type of movie that started well but then either never picked up enough momentum  or ran out of ideas before the end. As Pilar describes in her book it was like a family movie with all the familar faces from previous movies. I got the feeling that it was produced by Batjac on the cheap so it was guaranteed to make money but you got the feeling that it was more like a tv movie. [snapbac…

  • El Dorado (1967)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1960's

    Post

    Quote: “I thought this was a good fun movie, and very enjoyable. ... Reviewers, found the film, not spectacular., but a crisp diversion, with some amusing moments.” That's a smart way of putting it. I'll post a couple questions here: 1) According to the Internet Movie Database, El Dorado debuted in Japan in December 1966, six months before it premiered in America in June 1967. imdb.com/title/tt0061619/releaseinfo Is that true, and if so, why? 2) It seems as if the daytime shots of and in "El Dor…

  • Rooster Cogburn (1975)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1970's

    Post

    Quote: “Originally posted by Robbie@Feb 10 2006, 05:52 PM I thought that this was a prettly flat movie and Dukes worst since 'The Undefeated'. Duke himself said that the story was stale and the script poor bit he though two spirtited performances from him and Hepburn could bring the movie up a notch or two. While Duke and Hepburn are excellent as well as the scenary everything else is wrong. Too much time is spent with the bad guys whom pose no threat whatsoever and the finale is quite poor. Thi…

  • The Cowboys (1972)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1970's

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    The Cowboys (Mark Rydell, 1972) is definitely one of Wayne's best and most solidly developed late Westerns. We discuss the film (and its potential political implications) in great detail here: imdb.com/title/tt0068421/board/flat/35993643 Also, does anyone know if John Ford made any contributions to the picture? Check out the following photographs: http://www.imdb.com/gallery/mptv/1207/Mptv...ath_key=0068421 http://www.imdb.com/gallery/mptv/1207/3981...y=0068421&seq=2

  • The Train Robbers (1973)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1970's

    Post

    The Train Robbers (Burt Kennedy, 1973) is mildly entertaining and lightly enjoyable, and I certainly prefer it to Rooster Cogburn (Stuart Millar, 1975). However, it's also slight and simplistic, and it needed a richer writer-director than Burt Kennedy to bring out greater depths and darkness, the kind of intricacy and tension that could have made the film something more than disposable entertainment. I didn't feel that Kennedy set up the bizarre, comically ambiguous "twist' ending with appropria…

  • Mark Rydell

    joekiddlouischama - - Directors

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    The Cowboys (Mark Rydell, 1972) is easily one of Wayne's best late Westerns. It's been said that Rydell hated the Duke's politics, but they made a fine film together. We discuss the movie (and its potential political implications) in the following thread: imdb.com/title/tt0068421/board/flat/35993643

  • I also think that Wayne offers his best, most complex and intricate performance, more understated than Ethan Edwards in The Searchers and Tom Dunson in Red River (which are powerful performances in their own right), but highly underrated for that reason. To quote myself about the Duke's character in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence: Tom Doniphon may be Wayne's most complex character, tough, unafraid, and impeccably competent, but weary, fatalistic, melancholic, and ultimately depressed, self-des…

  • To me, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence (John Ford, 1962) is the best film that Wayne ever starred in (even better than the unforgettable yet flawed The Searchers) and one of my top-five all-time Westerns.

  • The Alamo (1960)

    joekiddlouischama - - The 1960's

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    Regarding John Ford's role, see my posts here: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000142/board/t...353045#50353045 http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000142/board/t...353446#50353446 The idea that Ford just shot some scarcely used second-unit battle scenes may well be a case of "When the legend becomes fact, print the legend."

  • I think that Cahill U.S. Marshal (Andrew V. McLaglen, 1973) is a bit underrated. Many film fans don't like the sort of Disney quality that comes with a story focused on children, but the moral dilemmas are engaging and the theme of generational fracture is relevant and vital, for that time and for all times. I'm sure that many troubled fathers and sons can relate to it. It may not be a truly significant movie, and the filmmaking is probably mediocre at best, but it's worth viewing, and George Ke…

  • Westerns evoke a sense of escape, liberation, adventure, and Americana. They remind us of a rawer time when society was stripped-down, more dangerous, and more essential, when alertness, skill, and savvy were required to survive and when the air was fresh and pure. Back then, for better or for worse, existence was more elemental.