An Oscar For Duke?

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    There are 54 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by mfan0825.

    • Originally posted by arthurarnell@Sep 14 2005, 07:41 PM
      Hi

      When it came to Oscar performances John ayne always said that he had been nominated for a Best Actor award for She Wore A Yellow Ribbon. Althopugh in fact he hadn't been, his performance merited it but came at a very awkward time in the history of Hollywood.

      The Shootist was a victim to Hollywood schedulling and a lot of money being spent at the time on a giant ape, and as such was downright criminal.

      Regards

      Arthur
      [snapback]21408[/snapback]



      Hi Arthur,
      He certainly must be nominated for the She wore a yellow Ribbon. It is a really great film. But as for me I like Rio Grande most of all the trilogy, after that comes Fort Apache and the third - She wore a Yellow Ribbon. But as I noticed here most of Dukes fans put it on the first place.
      Of course all three films are among my favorites.
      For a pity I haven't seen The Shootist yet, but hope to.
      Regards,
      Senta
    • Originally posted by arthurarnell@Sep 14 2005, 11:41 AM
      The Shootist was a victim to Hollywood schedulling and a lot of money being spent at the time on a giant ape, and as such was downright criminal.


      I agree 10,000 percent, Arthur. If ever the Duke deserved an Oscar, it was for that performance, one of his very best.
      De gustibus non est disputandum
    • I think he definitely should have been nominated for "The Searchers." He really dug deep into his soul to find the anger for that role and then conveyed it so clearly on screen, that is Oscar worthy. I think he should of also been nominated for "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" and "The Shootist". "Shootist" should have been simply because how many actors get the chance to do such a dignified exit in their careers. Only John Wayne could do something so fictionally/biograpical, yet a strong quality story for his last movie. That in itself should have at least rated an honorary Oscar.


      Baby Sis


      :cowboy: :cowboy: :cowboy:
      "Give me a man like Duke Wayne"...Marueen O'Hara
    • Senta, Baby Sister, and Chilibill,

      John Wayne was Oscar nominated in 1949 but it was for Sands of Iwo Jima, not She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. He lost the Oscar that year to Broderick Crawford for All the King's Men, a role originally offered to Duke.

      When All the King's Men was being cast, Producer-Director Robert Rossen offered the role of Willie Stark to John Wayne. Rossen sent a copy of the script to Wayne's agent, Charles K. Feldman, who forwarded it to Wayne. After reading the script, Wayne sent it back with an angry letter attached. In it, he told Feldman that before he sent the script to any of his other clients, he should ask them if they wanted to star in a film that "smears the machinery of government for no purpose of humor or enlightenment," that "degrades all relationships," and that is populated by "drunken mothers; conniving fathers; double-crossing sweethearts; bad, bad, rich people; and bad, bad poor people if they want to get ahead." He accused Rossen of wanting to make a movie that threw acid on "the American way of life." If Feldman had such clients, Wayne wrote that the agent should "rush this script... to them." Wayne, however, said to the agent that "You can take this script and shove it up Robert Rossen's derriere..." Wayne later remarked that "To make Huey Long a wonderful, rough pirate was great," he said; "but, according to this picture, everybody was s--t except for this weakling intern doctor who was trying to find a place in the world." Broderick Crawford, who had played a supporting role in Wayne's Seven Sinners (1940), eventually received the part of Stark. In a bit of irony, Crawford was Oscar-nominated for the part of Stark and found himself competing against Wayne, who was nominated the same year for Sands of Iwo Jima (1949). Crawford won the Best Actor Oscar. Wayne, however, never regretted his decision to turn down the part.

      With regards to the original post, I believe John Wayne should have received Oscars for both Red River and The Searchers. He also definitely at least deserved a nomination for Stagecoach, The Quiet Man, Rio Bravo, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

      "I am not intoxicated - yet." McLintock!

    • Originally posted by ejgreen77@Sep 18 2005, 06:23 AM
      Senta, Baby Sister, and Chilibill,

      John Wayne was Oscar nominated in 1949 but it was for Sands of Iwo Jima, not She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. He lost the Oscar that year to Broderick Crawford for All the King's Men, a role originally offered to Duke.

      When All the King's Men was being cast, Producer-Director Robert Rossen offered the role of Willie Stark to John Wayne. Rossen sent a copy of the script to Wayne's agent, Charles K. Feldman, who forwarded it to Wayne. After reading the script, Wayne sent it back with an angry letter attached. In it, he told Feldman that before he sent the script to any of his other clients, he should ask them if they wanted to star in a film that "smears the machinery of government for no purpose of humor or enlightenment," that "degrades all relationships," and that is populated by "drunken mothers; conniving fathers; double-crossing sweethearts; bad, bad, rich people; and bad, bad poor people if they want to get ahead." He accused Rossen of wanting to make a movie that threw acid on "the American way of life." If Feldman had such clients, Wayne wrote that the agent should "rush this script... to them." Wayne, however, said to the agent that "You can take this script and shove it up Robert Rossen's derriere..." Wayne later remarked that "To make Huey Long a wonderful, rough pirate was great," he said; "but, according to this picture, everybody was s--t except for this weakling intern doctor who was trying to find a place in the world." Broderick Crawford, who had played a supporting role in Wayne's Seven Sinners (1940), eventually received the part of Stark. In a bit of irony, Crawford was Oscar-nominated for the part of Stark and found himself competing against Wayne, who was nominated the same year for Sands of Iwo Jima (1949). Crawford won the Best Actor Oscar. Wayne, however, never regretted his decision to turn down the part.

      With regards to the original post, I believe John Wayne should have received Oscars for both Red River and The Searchers. He also definitely at least deserved a nomination for Stagecoach, The Quiet Man, Rio Bravo, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.
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      Hi Ejgreen,
      Thank you for interesting information.
      But we never write that She wore a yellow ribbon was nominated for Oskar, only that is should be.
      Regards,
      Senta
    • Re: Stagecoach (1939)

      mfan0825 wrote:

      Amen!!!!!! He truly was an incredible actor. So very very natural and so realistic.
      I feel he's underrated as an actor. Other films he shoudl have won an Oscar for: The Searchers, Stagecoach, The Green Berets and many more...
      Didn't he win a Lifetime Achievement Oscar?


      I researched your question but could not find any awards under Lifetime Achievement (which is heart breaking) but I did find a list of his awards for you to peruse:imdb.com/name/nm0000078/awards

      Kcat
    • Re: An Oscar For Duke?

      Well pard I think you have a pretty good list. I guess if I was to add just one film is would be The Sons Of Katie Elder. mainly because heres a man just out of the hopsital. Losing a Lung and two Ribs. Still able to stand tall and deliver!
      Thank ya- Thank ya kindly. Big Duke
      That'll Be the Day!