Chisum (1970)

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    There are 143 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • Re: Chisum (1970)

      Just got Chisum on DVD, having owned it for years on video

      Great movie, hopefully get to watch it again today

      It apparently is based on the Lincoln County Wars, of which I have ordered the book from Amazon.com

      Still awaiting delivery
      Windage & elevation Ms.Langdon, windage & elevation!
    • Facts About John Chisum

      source: Wikipedia

      John Simpson Chisum
      (15 August 182420 December 1884) was a wealthy cattle baron in the American West in the mid-to-late 1880s. Born in Hardeman County, Tennessee, Chisum's family moved to Texas in 1837, with Chisum finding work as a building contractor. He also served as county clerk in Lamar County. John Chisum got involved in the cattle business in 1854 and became one of the first to send his herds to New Mexico. He obtained land along the Pecos River by right of occupancy and eventually became the owner of a large ranch in the Bosque Grande, about forty miles south of Fort Sumner, with over 100,000 head of cattle. In 1866-67, Chisum formed a partnership with cattlemen Charles Goodnight and Oliver Loving to assemble and drive herds of cattle for sale to the Army in Fort Sumner and Santa Fe, New Mexico.
      When Chisum died in Eureka Springs on 20 December 1884, he was unmarried and left his estate worth $500,000 to his brothers Pitzer and James. While living in Bolivar, Texas, he lived with a young slave girl named Jensie and had two daughters with her. The relationship is described in the book, "Three Ranches West." John had an extended family living with him at the South Springs ranch in Roswell, and this family, along with hired help, often numbered two dozen at the main ranch headquarters. Chisum's niece Sallie Chisum, the daughter of his brother James, became a beloved figure in the area where she lived until 1934. Both she and her uncle John are honored by statues to their memory at Roswell and Artesia.

      Lincoln County War

      Chisum was a business associate of Alexander McSween, a principal figure in the Lincoln County War. With money, advice, and influence behind the scenes, he played a role in the dispute between the opposing factions of cattle farmers and business owners. When Lewis Wallace took office as Governor of New Mexico on 1 October 1878, he proclaimed an amnesty for all those involved in the bitter feud. However, after Billy the Kid surrendered to the authorities, he was told he would be charged with the killing of Sheriff William J. Brady.
      Billy the Kid escaped from custody and went to see Chisum. Billy believed he was owed $500, but Chisum refused to pay, claiming that he had given Billy horses, supplies, and protection over the years in lieu of payment. Billy the Kid responded by promising to steal enough cattle to make up this sum. Billy's gang also stole from other cattlemen and became a serious problem in Lincoln County. His gang included Dave Rudabaugh, Billy Wilson, Tom O'Folliard and Charlie Bowdre.
      In 1880, Chisum was involved in getting Pat Garrett elected as sheriff of Lincoln County. Garrett immediately attempted to deal with the problems being caused by Billy the Kid. In December 1880, Garrett shot dead two of the Kid's gang, Tom O'Folliard and Charles Bowdre. Soon afterwards Billy the Kid, Dave Rudabaugh and Billy Wilson were captured by Garrett.
      Windage & elevation Ms.Langdon, windage & elevation!
    • Re: Facts About John Chisum

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      [INDENT][INDENT][INDENT][INDENT][INDENT][INDENT]Here is a little story about the Chisholm Trail, and the John Wayne Film "Red River." that many people think was One Of The Best Westerns Of All Time ! :teeth_smile: wyntoontrip.com/REDRIVER1.html[/INDENT][/INDENT][INDENT][INDENT]Chilibill[/INDENT][INDENT]:cowboy:[/INDENT][/INDENT]

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    • Re: Facts About John Chisum

      26 bar ranch wrote:



      [INDENT][INDENT][INDENT][INDENT][INDENT][INDENT]Here is a little story about the Chisum Trail, and the John Wayne Film "Red River." that many people think was One Of The Best Westerns Of All Time ! :teeth_smile: wyntoontrip.com/REDRIVER1.html[/INDENT][/INDENT][INDENT][INDENT]Chilibill[/INDENT][INDENT]:cowboy:[/INDENT][/INDENT]

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      Only one thing wrong, Bill - it's actually "Chisholm Trail"
      De gustibus non est disputandum
    • Re: Facts About John Chisum

      [INDENT]
      [INDENT][INDENT]Stumpy, your sure a Pickey Old ---- But What The Hell would I know about Spelling, I am just an Old Aerospace Engineer, and an Old Run Down Cowboy !!![/INDENT][INDENT]But I Fix-It Just For You ! :wink_smile:[/INDENT][/INDENT]

      [INDENT][INDENT]William Thomas Brooks The Third :wink_smile: I think I Spelled My Name Right ? :yeaahh:[/INDENT][INDENT]:cowboy:[/INDENT][/INDENT]

      [/INDENT]
    • Re: Facts About John Chisum

      26 bar ranch wrote:

      [INDENT][INDENT][INDENT]Stumpy, your sure a Pickey Old ---- But What The Hell would I know about Spelling, I am just an Old Aerospace Engineer, and an Old Run Down Cowboy !!![/INDENT][INDENT]But I Fix-It Just For You ! :wink_smile:[/INDENT][/INDENT][INDENT][INDENT]William Thomas Brooks The Third :wink_smile: I think I Spelled My Name Right ? :yeaahh:[/INDENT][INDENT]:cowboy:[/INDENT][/INDENT][/INDENT]


      I'm sorry, Bill, I posted the corrected spelling before I read your link, which gave the correct spelling. It was just a reflex, since I live right on the old Chisholm Trail.
      De gustibus non est disputandum
    • In answer to Robbie's question
      -----------------------------------------------




      Early life

      Patrick Floyd Garrett was born in Chambers County, Alabama (near present day Cusseta). He grew up on a prosperous Louisiana plantation near Haynesville in northern Claiborne Parish, just below the Arkansas state line. He left home in 1869 and found work as a cowboy in Dallas County, Texas.
      In 1875, he left to hunt buffalo. In 1878, Garrett shot and killed a fellow hunter who charged at Garrett with a hatchet over a disagreement over buffalo hides. Upon dying, the hunter brought Garrett to tears upon asking him to forgive him.
      Garrett moved to New Mexico and briefly found work as a cowpuncher before quitting to open his own saloon. A tall man, he was referred to by locals as "Juan Largo" or "Long John." In 1879, Garrett married Juanita Gutierrez, who died within a year. In 1880, he married Gutierrez's sister, Apolonaria. The couple had nine children.

      Portrait of Pat Garrett from The Story of the Outlaws[2]





      Lincoln County War

      On November 7, 1880, the sheriff of Lincoln County, New Mexico, George Kimbell, resigned with two months left in his term. As Kimbell's successor, the county appointed Garrett, a member of the Republican Party who ran as a Democrat and a gunman of some reputation who had promised to restore law and order. Garrett was charged with tracking down and arresting a friend from his saloon keeping days, Henry McCarty, a jail escapee and Lincoln County War participant who often went by the aliases Henry Antrim and William Harrison Bonney, but is better known as "Billy the Kid". McCarty was an alleged murderer who had participated in the Lincoln County War. He was said to have killed twenty-one men, one for every year of his life, but the actual total was probably closer to nine. New Mexico Governor Lew Wallace had personally put a $500 reward on McCarty's capture.
      During a December 19 shootout, Garrett killed Tom O'Folliard, a member of McCarty's gang. A few nights later, the sheriff's posse killed Charlie Bowdre, captured The Kid and his companions, and transported the captives to Mesilla, New Mexico, for trial. Though he was convicted, The Kid managed to escape from jail on April 18, 1881, after killing his guards J. W. Bell and Bob Olinger.
      On July 14, 1881, Garrett visited Fort Sumner to question a friend of The Kid's about the whereabouts of the outlaw. He learned that The Kid was staying with a mutual friend, Pedro Maxwell (son of land baron Lucien Maxwell). Around midnight, Garrett went to Maxwell's house. The Kid was asleep in another part of the house but woke up hungry in the middle of the night and entered the kitchen where Garrett was standing in the shadows. The Kid did not recognize the man standing in dark. "Quien es (Who is it)? Quien es?" The Kid asked repeatedly. Garrett replied by shooting at The Kid twice, the first shot hitting him in the heart, and the second one did not hit him. (Some historians have questioned Garrett's account of the shooting, alleging the incident happened differently. They claim that Garrett went into Paulita Maxwell's room and tied her up. The Kid walked into her room, and Garrett ambushed him with a single blast from his Sharps rifle.)
      There has been much dispute over the details of the Kid's death that night. The way Garrett allegedly killed McCarty without warning eventually sullied the lawman's reputation. Garrett claimed that Billy the Kid had entered the room armed with a pistol, but no gun was found on his body. Other accounts claim he entered carrying a kitchen knife. There is no hard evidence to support this; however, if he did so it is likely he intended to cut some food for himself, since he had no idea anyone was waiting for him. Regardless of how he died, Billy was a wanted criminal, and so Sheriff Garrett chose not to give him a chance to surrender.
      Still, at the time the shooting solidified Garrett's fame as a lawman and gunman, and led to numerous appointments to law enforcement positions, as well as requests that he pursue outlaws in other parts of New Mexico.

      After the Lincoln County War

      His law enforcement career never achieved any great success following the Lincoln County War, and he mostly used that single era in his life as his stepping-stone to higher positions. After finishing out his term as sheriff, Garrett became a rancher and released a book ghostwritten by his friend Ash Upson in 1882 about his experiences with McCarty. However, he lost the next election for Lincoln County sheriff and was never paid the $500 reward for McCarty's capture, since he had allegedly killed him. In 1884, he lost an election for the New Mexico State Senate. Later that year, he left New Mexico and helped found and captain a company of Texas Rangers.
      He returned to New Mexico briefly in 1885. In October 1889, Garrett ran for Chaves County, New Mexico, sheriff but lost. By this time, his rough disposition was beginning to wear thin with much of the populace, and rumors of his less than admirable killing of Billy The Kid were beginning to affect his popularity. Garrett left New Mexico in 1891 for Uvalde, Texas. He returned to New Mexico in 1896 to investigate the disappearance of Albert Jennings Fountain and Fountain's young son Henry.
      Windage & elevation Ms.Langdon, windage & elevation!
    • Re: Chisum (1970)

      was really disappointed with my dvd of "chisum"
      bought it from "hmv" but the sound quality was really bad and distorted - it meant having to concentrate more to pick up the story line - what made it worse was that all the background info that you can go onto came out fine - was just the film that wasn t right
      "Sorry don t get it done, Dude" (Rio Bravo)

      Hooked on The Duke
    • Re: Chisum (1970)

      badger wrote:

      was really disappointed with my dvd of "chisum"
      bought it from "hmv" but the sound quality was really bad and distorted - it meant having to concentrate more to pick up the story line - what made it worse was that all the background info that you can go onto came out fine - was just the film that wasn t right
      .

      Sounds like a faulty copy. Take it back and get another one hopefully that will help.

      Mike
    • Re: Chisum (1970)

      I have been away for a while, and just wanted to say hi!
      Speaking of Chisum, I love the picture of John Wayne, on his horse on the hill, looking into the distance. This is how I always will remember the Great John Wayne! Does anybody know if there is a poster or picture out there of him in that manor?


      That image is on #2 of both the 8x10 and 11x14 lobby cards for the movie. Occasionally you can find them on Ebay. The image was also on the cast mug John Wayne gave away for this film. One of my favorite scenes too!