Operation Pacific (1951)

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    There are 65 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • Re: Operation Pacific (1951)

      badger wrote:

      i bought this film today and as always, people who think they know best, said "oh i ve never heard of that one- won t be very good" (yawn yawn) - i now put it up with the best of my duke dvds. it had everything, exciting action, romance, humour, his friendship with ward bond, which shone through the whole film and .....of course....and i make no apologies for this, the sex appeal of john wayne is absolutely second to none. top film - and duke at his very best


      I just posted that I watched it again. Being a diehard Ward fan, it has been a favorite for a while! I always cry when he keeps saying "Take her down" after being riddled with bullets, but, as you say his presence remains throughout the movie. And GORCH, I am amazed you had never seen this before. But glad you liked it. I find that Patricia O Neal and Duke had quite a charismatic type relationship....no Maureen O'hara, for sure.....but they had their special way of creating something not only fun to watch, but touching also. If I am not wrong, Duke really enjoyed working with her. OH Ward......sure would have loved some movies with you and Duke as you both grew older....more like Rio Bravo. But, Wagon Train got in the way, and your early death prevented it. LOVE THIS MOVIE. And THANKS LARRY for the great shots of Ward. This time, He was Duke's boss, LOL!
      KEITH
    • Re: Operation Pacific (1951)

      Reading about this got me to bring it out for a watching. I read how it was dedicated to the lost submariners....had forgotten that.

      My Dad was born deaf, but my grandmother never let him be "deaf and dumb" as she taught him the very newest way of talking. Dad had lots of "friends", but only one true one....the type that you paint the town's water tower the school colors with late at night! His name was Bobby Brown. Dad couldn't go to war because he was deaf, so when he graduated from Clemson architectural school, he designed airplanes at Curtis Wright Airfield for the War. But Bobby went. He was in command of a submarine. He gathered up quite an array of ribbons. And then, one day, his sub was never heard from again. We always thought it might be found someday, and maybe we could piece together what happened in Bobby's last hours. But, it wasn't to be. All that is left of Dad's friend is a nice little state park in Elberton, GA.
      So......Bobby Brown will never be forgotten. Keith
    • Re: Operation Pacific (1951)

      I always get more choked up watching WWII Navy films than any other, as my dad was in the Navy from '44-'46.

      He drove a Higgins boat while stationed on the USS Jerauld (APA 174). He was in several campaigns, but Okinawa was the bloodiest. He spoke VERY little about the "ugly" side of his time in service, but I did glean from our many conversations, that he placed some of the first Marines on Okinawa (his ship transported troops, munitions, and vehicles) with his Higgens boat - under fire the entire time, and of course, took back dead and wounded as he left the island. He said he lost count how many trips he made, but in addition to dodging shells and machine gun fie, ALL the ships and their service boats were under constant threat of kamikaze attack.

      Since the end of the Pacific war was near, this be ame the largest concentration of these type attacks during the war. Okinawa was the LAST stronghold the enemy held before we could touch the mainland of Japan.

      BTW, Keith - I got your message. It's been a rough several days here, but I WILL be responding to you by the end of the week!!
    • Re: Operation Pacific (1951)

      The Tennesseean wrote:

      I always get more choked up watching WWII Navy films than any other, as my dad was in the Navy from '44-'46.

      He drove a Higgins boat while stationed on the USS Jerauld (APA 174). He was in several campaigns, but Okinawa was the bloodiest. He spoke VERY little about the "ugly" side of his time in service, but I did glean from our many conversations, that he placed some of the first Marines on Okinawa (his ship transported troops, munitions, and vehicles) with his Higgens boat - under fire the entire time, and of course, took back dead and wounded as he left the island. He said he lost count how many trips he made, but in addition to dodging shells and machine gun fie, ALL the ships and their service boats were under constant threat of kamikaze attack.

      Since the end of the Pacific war was near, this be ame the largest concentration of these type attacks during the war. Okinawa was the LAST stronghold the enemy held before we could touch the mainland of Japan.

      BTW, Keith - I got your message. It's been a rough several days here, but I WILL be responding to you by the end of the week!!


      OK Russ.
      Very interesting that you know so much about your Dad's role. I think someone will be contacting you soon about it.
      Not sure if I posted this or not. But Mom did her bit in WWII. Here she is..,she is the one in the white! Keith Oh, also, Russ, I got a letter back from the conductor of the Navy Band. He is going to try to find a recording for me, and may even bring this into their repertoire. Have you even heard them play Anchor's Aweigh and Waves of the Navy at the same time with the chorus singing each song? It is absolutely beautiful, and for any old Navy folks tears are brought to the eyes. Mom taught my brother and I to do both songs on long car trips, and we were singing both together with her before we were 10 or so. Sure would love it if you have it in your collection. I will ask Bill also..........Gives me goose bumps just thinking about it! Keith
    • Re: Operation Pacific (1951)

      Contains spoilers for any new people to this old movie.

      OH THIS IS A GREAT ONE, LARRY. Ward, (Pop) was actually Duke's, (named Duke in the movie), commanding officer a good bit of this movie, which I am sure you know, until a strafing from a Japanese ship pretending injury ended his life. But not before he could issue commands to "take her down, TAKE HER DOWN"! Any closeups of Ward would be tremendously appreciated. You will assuredly be well mentioned in my book.....already are, of course. Also, any of members of the Ford Stock Company. The book is all about giving credit to the Undredited stuntmen and character actors who actually MADE our heroes. As Pop dictated to be written to the "builders of this boat" after the first depth charge run and the boat held up to keep them and their precious cargo of Nuns and children alive, "Thanks!" KEITH
      God, she reminds me of me! DUKE
    • Re: Operation Pacific (1951)

      Take her down...........take her..............DOWN! Ward's last part of Operation Pacific.
      God, she reminds me of me! DUKE
    • Re: Operation Pacific (1951)

      Funny, since we were posting on Operation Pacific, I looked back for pics of Ward. I got here and found a pic from They Were Expendable. It shows Jack Pennick, Duke, Robert Montgomery and Ward. Notice the bandage on Duke's hand...........what kept him in sick bay. Wasn't looking for it..........just know that picture well. KEITH

      ethanedwards wrote:

      OPERATION PACIFIC

      DIRECTED BY GEORGE WAGGNER
      PRODUCED BY LOUIS F. EDELMAN
      MUSIC BY MAX STEINER
      WARNER BROS


      ..

      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Submarine commander Duke Gifford feels guilty in the death
      of his former commanding officer, as well as about his failed marriage.
      These issues pull at him during a hazardous mission against the Japanese in World War II.
      Summary written by Jim Beaver

      Full Cast
      John Wayne .... Lt Cmdr. Duke E. Gifford
      Patricia Neal .... Lt. (j.g.) Mary Stuart
      Ward Bond .... Cmdr. John T. 'Pop' Perry
      Scott Forbes .... Lt. Larry
      Philip Carey .... Lt. (j.g.) Bob Perry
      Paul Picerni .... Jonesy
      William Campbell .... The Talker (as Bill Campbell)
      Kathryn Givney .... Cmdr. Steele
      Martin Milner .... Ens. Caldwell
      Cliff Clark .... Commander, SUBPAC
      Jack Pennick .... The Chief
      Virginia Brissac .... Sister Anna
      Vincent Fotre .... Soundman
      Lewis Martin .... Squad commander
      Sam Edwards .... Junior
      Louis Mosconi .... Radarman Mosconi
      John Baer .... Fighter pilot (uncredited)
      Robert Carson .... Torpedo Officer (uncredited)
      Gail Davis .... Bit part (uncredited)
      Chris Drake .... Sparks (radioman) (uncredited)
      James Flavin .... Mick (SP commander) (uncredited)
      Bess Flowers .... Dance floor extra (uncredited)
      Ray Hyke .... Crewman (uncredited)
      Gayle Kellogg .... Crewman (uncredited)
      Al Kikume .... Hawaiian (uncredited)
      Brett King .... Lt. Ernie Stark (uncredited)
      Mike Lally .... Quartermaster (uncredited)
      Keith Larsen .... Crewman (uncredited)
      Harry Lauter .... Freddie (officer on submarine Corvena) (uncredited)
      Richard Loo .... Japanese fighter pilot (uncredited)
      Bob Nash .... Quartermaster (uncredited)
      Carl Saxe .... Shore Patrolman (uncredited)
      William Self .... Helmsman (uncredited)
      Michael St. Angel .... Lt. Jorgenson (uncredited)
      Bert Stevens .... Naval officer at briefing (uncredited)
      Milburn Stone .... Ground Control officer (uncredited)
      Harlan Warde .... Dick (admiral's aide) (uncredited)
      Steve Wayne .... Crewman (uncredited)
      Mack Williams .... Crewman (uncredited)
      Carleton Young .... Pilot briefing officers on carrier (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      George Waggner (written by)

      Original Music
      Max Steiner

      Cinematography
      Bert Glennon (director of photography)

      Trivia
      * During the film, the men of the Thunderfish watch Cary Grant in Destination Tokyo (1943).

      During filming Gary Cooper visited the set to persuade his mistress Patricia Neal to abort his child. Neal later became a pro-life activist.

      John Wayne and Patricia Neal did not get along during filming. She was particularly annoyed by his treatment of a gay publicity man. Nearly fourteen years later, however, they worked together on In Harm's Way (1965) where she noted that he had mellowed a lot, possibly because he was seriously ill with lung cancer at the time.

      This movie's opening foreword and dedication states: "When the Pacific Fleet was destroyed by the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, it remained for the submarines to carry the war to the enemy. In the four years that followed, our undersea craft sank six million tons of Japanese shipping including some of the proudest ships of the Imperial Navy. Fifty-two of our submarines and thirty-five hundred officers and men were lost. It is to these men and the entire silent service that this picture is humbly dedicated."

      The problems with submarine torpedoes shown in the movie are accurate. A poorly designed and tested firing pin could malfunction on a good hit (that is, a torpedo striking within about 45 degrees of perpendicular to the side of the target). Poor hits (at a very sharp angle to the side of the ship) could often produce more reliable explosions. Finding the problem, while not performed by the submarine crews as shown, actually did occur in a similar manner.

      John Wayne was dissatisfied with the finished film, believing it to be overlong and containing too much romance. He was also opposed from the beginning to the casting of Patricia Neal, whom he felt was too young at 24 for the role of his ex-wife.

      Goofs
      * Factual errors: It is impossible for a sailor to communicate with an airplane by using a sound-powered phone.

      * Continuity: Inside the submarine, Duke talks with Pop while Pop smokes a cigar. In the following shot, when Duke stands up and leaves, Pop is holding the coffee cup with both hands, with no cigar at all. But next shot he is holding the cup with one hand and the cigar with the other.

      * Continuity: Duke walks in the hospital corridor holding the cap in his right hand. In the subsequent shot he appears in front of the nursery, holding the cap with both hands.

      * Continuity: In the hospital, after Duke kisses Mary Stuart, she turns to her right side. But the next shot shows her, in close-up, facing him already.

      * Continuity: In the submarine deck, Duke is holding a lit cigarette when he sees Mary Stuart arriving with Pop in a jeep. In the following shot, when he steps down the gangway, the cigarette has disappeared.

      * Continuity: When Pop gives the order "Cast off for'ard", the person behind him is holding a microphone below his chin with his left hand. In the subsequent shot his left hand holds the left earphone.

      * Continuity: When the submarine is being machine-gunned by the Japanese plane, Duke is just entering the doorway - meaning that if he got shot he could only get shot in the back. Nevertheless, he gets shot right in the front, near his right shoulder.

      * Continuity: Toward the end of the film, after Duke kisses Mary Stuart, she holds his right arm to follow him. In the next shot she is turning around the left arm to hold his arm.

      * Revealing mistakes: One of the torpedoes fired from the sub is pulled by a visible cable.

      * Revealing mistakes: When the Thunder is "depth-charged" near the beginning of the film, it's US Navy sailors who are dropping the cans. Only a few frames are shown, but it's clearly US Naval personnel (possibly stock footage).

      * Anachronisms: In the opening scenes the stenciling on the life rafts show the date of manufacture as 8/49 which is approximately four years after the end of the war.

      * Revealing mistakes: After the first shore leave, the Thunderfish returns to action. It sinks the first ship it encounters. However, the ship that is seen through the periscope before the torpedoes are fired isn't the same ship that is seen sinking in the second look through the periscope.

      * Anachronisms: The sinking of the U.S.S. Corvina by a Japanese submarine was an actual event that happened almost a year earlier than shown in the film.

      * Crew or equipment visible: When the Thunderfish dives under to come up astern of the Japanese decoy ship, it's clear both ships are in a diving tank.

      * Continuity: In the first attack sequence after Pop tells Duke he's getting command of the Thunderfish there is a shot of the sub cruising underwater. Just past, and under, the bow in the lower right of the frame you can see a depth charge drum falling just before the scene changes back to an interior shot. At this point the boat was just going to GQ and was not yet under attack by surface ships.

      * Factual errors: The studio set is much larger than a wartime submarine would have been.

      * Revealing mistakes: The first ship sunk on the second patrol has US Navy numbering on its bow.

      * Factual errors: The film is careful to point out that the Thunderfish's first arrival at Pearl Harbor was in 1942 but John Wayne, Ward Bond, Philip Carey, and others all wear ribbons that were not instituted until very late 1942 and not actually implemented until 1943 (Presidential Unit Citation, Pacific Campaign Ribbon, others). In particular, Duke (John Wayne) wears a Presidential Unit Citation ribbon with one bronze star, indicating he received this award twice before it was created. Ribbons were also displayed out of order, incomplete, and otherwise improperly displayed.

      * Factual errors: The sailors on the IJN Decoy Ship are using US .30 cal Browning Light Machine guns. Highly unlikely that they would use foreign weapons and ammunition, even if captured earlier in the war. Supply would have been impossible.

      * Factual errors: Mary Stuart was allowed into the ComSubPac plotting room. It is next to impossible to believe that a highly secret room like that (with location and position of the entire Pacific Fleet) would be accessible to common US Navy Personnel like nurses.

      * Anachronisms: The fight with the "decoy vessel" was a complete plot fabrication. The Imperial Japanese Navy is not known to have operated specific submarine decoy vessels (commonly called Q-Ships). These were used by the Allied Powers, primarily by the British Royal Navy and the United States Navy. Had this been an actual depiction of a fight between a Q-Ship and a submarine, the submarine would not have surfaced, as that is exactly what a Q-Ship would have wanted. Also, even rammed, a decoy ship would be extremely hard to sink, as they were usually filled with extra flotation (typically wood) to keep them afloat after taking damage.

      * Factual errors: When speaking with LCDR Gifford on the foredeck, the sailor from the south states that his "great grand pappy served on the Merrimack". Someone that proud of an ancestor would have known that the ship was named Virginia (the correct Confederate Navy name), not Merrimack (the name used in bad history texts for decades).

      * Factual errors: The pictures of a large splash immediately after the Thunderfish fires torpedoes are incorrect. These are torpedoes launched by a surface ship. A submarine launched torpedo should never break the surface.

      * Anachronisms: In the attack on "the whole Imperial fleet", the vessel actually shown to be hit is a merchant ship, something which would not be present in a group of warships.

      * Anachronisms: The final attack on the carrier left behind by the Imperial fleet makes no sense. Carriers were the most important vessels in a fleet, and would not be left behind without an escort of more than a single destroyer, especially in the presence of an enemy submarine. If the carrier had been too badly damaged to be saved, it would have been destroyed by its own fleet.

      * Revealing mistakes: When the dummy torpedo warhead is being hauled up by crane and dropped on a target to test the new firing mechanisms, 3 tests are performed. All 3 tests are the exact same piece of footage. You can tell by the way the warhead bounces when it hits its target, the same 2 seamen are to either side of it in the foreground in all 3 tests, and the left seaman jerks his right arm to the left in exactly the same manner in all 3 tests.

      * Anachronisms: At the Pearl Harbor brig, the Shore Patrol commander complains that the crews of numerous submarines are brawling with his men, naming the Tang and Wahoo among them. These two boats could not have been operating from Pearl at the same time, as the Wahoo was lost in action in October 1943 and the Tang did not enter the war zone until the following January.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Pearl Harbor Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, O`ahu, Hawaii, USA

      Watch the Trailer:-

      [extendedmedia]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3O64MpWOlH8[/extendedmedia]
      God, she reminds me of me! DUKE
    • Re: Operation Pacific (1951)

      Your welcome Keith. I can understand. I have changed a great many wrong things on the Net about Ward Bond, his roles, and episodes of Wagon Train....still keep finding more....I will check OP. As you know......I have researched him for quite some time. You have many to copy and write about. My MAIN one is Ward, and I have the time to research rather than just trust Wikipedia, IMDB, etc. If ever I can help you with him, just let me know. KP LOL, I haven't read the text.........should I?

      ethanedwards wrote:

      Well spotted Keith thanks,
      I have now removed it from the opening post!

      Strangely when Googling,the movie Operation Pacific,
      that photo was quite high up in the images!!
      God, she reminds me of me! DUKE

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