Allegheny Uprising (1939)

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    There are 89 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • Allegheny Uprising (1939)

      ALLEGHENY UPRISING
      aka The First Rebel

      DIRECTED BY WILLIAM SEITER
      PRODUCED BY P. J. WOLFSON
      RKO RADIO PICTURES

      [IMG:http://i47.servimg.com/u/f47/11/97/59/03/duke_354.jpg]Photo with the courtesy of lasbugas

      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      In British colonial America, Captain Swanson's adherence to the rules
      results in Trader Callendar's selling to the Indians under cover of a government permit.
      Jim Smith won't sit still for that. He organizes troopers to dress up as Indians
      and intercept the shipments which, of course, gets him thrown in jail.
      Summary written by Ed Stephan

      Full Cast
      Claire Trevor .... Janie MacDougall
      John Wayne .... James Smith
      George Sanders .... Capt. Swanson
      Brian Donlevy .... Trader Ralph Callendar
      Wilfrid Lawson .... 'Mac' MacDougall
      Robert Barrat .... Magistrate Duncan
      John F. Hamilton .... The Professor
      Moroni Olsen .... Tom Calhoon
      Eddie Quillan .... Will Anderson
      Chill Wills .... John M'Cammon
      Ian Wolfe .... Mr. Poole
      Wallis Clark .... Sgt. McGlashan
      Monte Montague .... Magistrate Morris
      Olaf Hytten .... Gen. Gage
      Eddy Waller .... Jailer in Carlisle
      Clay Clement .... Gov. John Penn
      Earl Askam .... One of Jim's Black Boys (uncredited)
      Stanley Blystone .... Settler at McDowell's Mill (uncredited)
      Jess Cavin .... Colonial farmer (uncredited)
      Forrest Dillon .... One of Jim's Black Boys (uncredited)
      Jesse Graves .... Governor's servant (uncredited)
      Lew Harvey .... Settler at McDowell's Mill (uncredited)
      Leyland Hodgson .... Trial judge who protests (uncredited)
      Noble Johnson .... Captured Delaware Native American (uncredited)
      Carl Knowles .... One of Jim's Black Boys (uncredited)
      Ethan Laidlaw .... One of Jim's Black Boys (uncredited)
      Tom London .... Settler at McDowell's Mill (uncredited)
      Robert McKenzie .... Tavern cook (uncredited)
      Charles Middleton .... Dr. Stoke (uncredited)
      Clive Morgan .... English sergeant (uncredited)
      Bud Osborne .... One of Jim's Black Boys (uncredited)
      Jack O'Shea .... One of Callendar's men (uncredited)
      Douglas Spencer .... Prisoner in irons (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      Neil H. Swanson novel The First Rebel
      P.J. Wolfson screenplay

      Original Music
      Anthony Collins

      Cinematography
      Nicholas Musuraca

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Lake Sherwood, California, USA
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
      Sherwood Forest, California, USA

      Watch this Trailer

      Allegheny Uprising
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 13 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Allegheny Uprising is a 1939 film produced by RKO Pictures,
      starring Claire Trevor and John Wayne as pioneers of early American expansion
      in south central Pennsylvania.
      Clad in buckskin and a coonskin cap (as he would be a decade later in The Fighting Kentuckian),
      Wayne plays real-life James Smith, an American coping with British rule in colonial America.
      The film is loosely based on a historical event known as the Black Boys Rebellion of 1765,
      after the conclusion of the French and Indian War.

      [IMG:http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/allegeheny_1.jpg]

      The film did not fare well in its initial release.
      The superficially similar John Ford film Drums Along the Mohawk had been released only one week prior.
      Retitled The First Rebel for the United Kingdom,
      it was banned by the Ministry of Information for placing the British,
      already at war against Nazi Germany, in a bad light.

      [IMG:http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/duke007.jpg]

      The supporting cast includes Brian Donlevy, George Sanders, and Chill Wills,
      and the movie was written by P. J. Wolfson from the 1937 novel
      The First Rebel by Neil H. Swanson and directed by William A. Seiter.
      Claire Trevor and John Wayne also headed the cast of John Ford's Stagecoach the same year,
      and in Allegheny Uprising
      Trevor is top-billed over Wayne,
      due to her greater name value at the time.

      First review I've done, where I'm not sure which sub-forum, to place it!!
      We discussed, this amongst others, as whether, it's a miscellaneous, western, or even a war movie?
      I am going to decide, it's a western, as in the days of the film, this is as far ,that the west had got.
      However, it will at least, give us something to discuss!!
      Where would you place it?

      I really enjoy this film, and is a favourite.
      I thought, Duke acted well, and looked at ease with the part.
      RKO keen to cash in, on the success of Stagecoach
      cast Duke with Claire Trevor, who at that time was the bigger name.
      The chemistry, between them, was probably as good as it was with Maureen,
      and like Maureen, Claire and Duke, were to remain, life long friends.

      I am also a great admirer of Wilfrid Lawson, who was also in The Long Voyage Home
      I have always, liked his style, his humour, and most of all his voice.
      George Saunders, as the foppish, Englishman,
      (DUKE, disliked, him,he had to be restrained, from thumping him!!)
      Brian Donlevy, as the baddie, and Chill Willis, acquitted themselves well.
      I though it was a great story line, although it did portray us Brits in a somewhat
      bombastic way(we're not like that, I must say!!!)
      I thought it, an enjoyable film.
      RKO, hoped the Stagecoach combination would work, it didn't!!
      However, it did work, later in
      Dark Command

      User Review
      Fast Paced Western
      8 March 2003 | by (maughancannes) (Durham, England)

      This is a decently made RKO western, made a few years before the genre became truly great (1946 - 1962), though released the same year as the first classic of the genre ("Stagecoach"). Despite some heavy-handed romantic-comedy moments, the movie moves like one of its galloping horses - at one point, Wayne is wrongly accused of murder, is put in gaol, quells an outside mob riot from inside his cell, stands trial, and is freed all within 7 minutes !
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 3 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Hi Keith and thanks mate for such a great review. The first time I saw this movie I liked it as much as possible. I liked seeing The Duke in "Colonial times" as a "Black Boy of the Connacagee."

      The opening scenes were great when the British & French were exchanging prisoners. Like you, I always liked Wilfrid Lawson - though I have only seen him in this and one other movie. I fell in love with Claire Trevor because of this movie. Until I first saw this movie,

      I had only known George Sanders as Mr. Freeze in the 1960's Batman TV series. I thought he was great in the role of Captain Swanson. being by the book, made him more of a snobbish Martinet - which was a great touch to the character. Later when Swanson and his men were being besieged by the Black Boys, you see a more humad side to his character when he wakens a young British Soldier who has fallen asleep at his post. The Captain starts to berate him but treats the lad almost like he was his son.

      John F. Hamilton was brilliant as: The Professor. I liked how he always spoke up for Jim Smith.

      Brian Donlevy was VERY good as the evil trader Callendar. Donlevy makes for the perfect bad guy in this movie.

      It took me seeing this movie again before I spotted Chill Wills. C.W. is another of those character actors that I have always liked no marre what role he played.

      I am surprised however, to see that Eddy Waller was in this movie. I'm more used to him as a sikekick for some other Western star.

      Anyway my friend, thank you for such a great review. :) :D

      Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..
    • Ringo,

      If you liked Allegheny Uprising, you may also want to check out Cary Grant in The Howards of Virginia (1940). That one, along with Drums Along the Mohawk, are the only other movies I can think of that cover the American Revolution/Colonial period in American History.

      I liked Allegheny Uprising. It's a good movie, and also one of the Duke's rarest (here in the US, its not available on any home video format). It was also Duke's first film on the RKO contract he signed soon after the success of Stagecoach. He and Claire Trevor worked well together, as always. The setting of this one isn't too far from where I live here in Buffalo.

      E.J.
      [IMG:http://www.jwaynefan.com/images/gallery/jwatusc.jpg]
      "I am not intoxicated - yet." McLintock!

    • Hi EJ, thanks for this. Yep--im familiar with Drums ALong the Mohawk--soon as it was released on DvD--I got it. Im not familiar with the Cary Grant movie but it sounds like a good one. Being as I am a fan of his--if on DvD--ill buy it sight unseen. Here are a few other Pre Amer-Revol movies--to American Revolution movies that are excellent and I highly recommend.

      1) Unconquored w/ Gary Cooper & Ward Bond?
      2) Northwest Passage w/ Spencer Tracey, Robert Young and Walter Brennan.
      3) Ft Ti w/ George Montgomery.
      4) I forget some of their names but there were a few movied made from the John Jakes series of books. One is called, The Basterd and I think another is The Seekers--etc. Those were all excellent movies. I think in all, there were five or so movies made from his books.

      Take care and best regards--C.
      Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..
    • Ringo,

      How could I forget about Unconquored? That was a good one. Too bad it wasn't included in the Cecil B. DeMille Collection that Universal is releasing on DVD on May 23. Bummer. I'm pretty sure The Howards of Virginia is available on DVD, though.

      E.J.
      [IMG:http://www.jwaynefan.com/images/gallery/jwatusc.jpg]
      "I am not intoxicated - yet." McLintock!

    • Originally posted by ejgreen77@Jan 30 2006, 07:15 PM
      Ringo,

      How could I forget about [b]Unconquored
      ? That was a good one. Too bad it wasn't included in the Cecil B. DeMille Collection that Universal is releasing on DVD on May 23. Bummer. I'm pretty sure The Howards of Virginia is available on DVD, though.

      E.J.
      [snapback]26242[/snapback]

      [/b]


      Hi E.J. Sorry it took so long to reply--I was "out-of-it" for a few days.

      Oh man, Unconquored was the first movie of this type that I ever saw and I loved it from the first time I saw it. Yep, I hate mot seeing this great classic not being released. Same thing goes for: Beau Geste. I know that Beau Geste was released in a Gary Cooper Signature collection--but TRY finding one available. I'll check DDDvD.com and see if they have The Howards of Virginia. I'm always interested in seeing a film I feel is a great one--for the first time.

      Cheers and best regards--Carl.
      Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..
    • Originally posted by The Ringo Kid@Feb 2 2006, 05:28 PM
      Hi E.J. Sorry it took so long to reply--I was "out-of-it" for a few days.

      Oh man, Unconquored was the first movie of this type that I ever saw and I loved it from the first time I saw it. Yep, I hate mot seeing this great classic not being released. Same thing goes for: Beau Geste. I know that Beau Geste was released in a Gary Cooper Signature collection--but TRY finding one available. I'll check DDDvD.com and see if they have The Howards of Virginia. I'm always interested in seeing a film I feel is a great one--for the first time.

      Cheers and best regards--Carl.
      [snapback]26367[/snapback]



      Carl,

      You can order both The Howards of Virginia and the Gary Cooper collection at deepdiscountdvd.com

      As I said before, if you liked Allegheny Uprising, you'll like The Howards of Virginia. It was directed by Frank Lloyd (of Mutiny on the Bounty fame) and featured Cary Grant, Martha Scott (In Old Oklahoma), and Sir Cedric Hardwicke. Once you get used to the idea of Cary playing a backwoods hillbilly (he was really cast against type here), you'll enjoy it.

      E.J.
      [IMG:http://www.jwaynefan.com/images/gallery/jwatusc.jpg]
      "I am not intoxicated - yet." McLintock!

    • WaynamoJim,

      The 1936 version of The Last of the Mohicans starring Randolph Scott is not currently available on DVD. There is a DVD of the 1932 version with Harry Carey, Sr. There are also some episodes of a 1957 TV Series called "Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans" starring Lon Chaney Jr. that are available on DVD.

      Of course the 1992 version is also available.

      Here are the Url's:

      deepdiscountdvd.com/dvd.cfm?itemID=ALP004618

      deepdiscountdvd.com/dvd.cfm?itemID=ALP004929

      deepdiscountdvd.com/dvd.cfm?itemID=ALP004899

      deepdiscountdvd.com/dvd.cfm?itemID=ALP004619

      deepdiscountdvd.com/dvd.cfm?itemID=FXD001088

      [IMG:http://www.jwaynefan.com/images/gallery/jwatusc.jpg]
      "I am not intoxicated - yet." McLintock!

    • Hi

      You mention Northwest Passage in your earlier threads, this was a great film and one of Spencer Tracy's finest it a pity that they never did the second part of the film, for what reason I don't know but I'd love to find out more.

      The Howards of irginia If I remember correctly was panned when it came out I saw it on television many many years ago and it seemed to be alright.




      Regards

      Arthur
      Walk Tall - Talk Low
    • Originally posted by ejgreen77@Feb 2 2006, 08:28 PM
      Carl,

      You can order both [b]The Howards of Virginia
      deepdiscountdvd.com/dvd.cfm?itemID=COL007764 and the Gary Cooper collection at deepdiscountdvd.com

      As I said before, if you liked Allegheny Uprising, you'll like The Howards of Virginia. It was directed by Frank Lloyd (of Mutiny on the Bounty fame) and featured Cary Grant, Martha Scott (In Old Oklahoma), and Sir Cedric Hardwicke. Once you get used to the idea of Cary playing a backwoods hillbilly (he was really cast against type here), you'll enjoy it.

      E.J.
      [snapback]26370[/snapback]

      [/b]


      Hi EJ, thanks for this but, the Gary Cooper collection I am looking for was sold at Best Buy as a box set of the five movies including Beau Geste. Each movie was on its own DvD and I think there was a bonus DvD that had a TCM documentary/biography about Gary Cooper. I cannot seem to find this listed anywhere. I saw the 2 dvd set with the same 5 movies on them for sale at Best Buy (where I aint going to pay their $25.00) for them.

      I'm also a big fan of Mutiny on the Bounty and are wanting to get a copy of that as soon as possible. Chas Laughton makes a perfect Capt Bligh and Clark Gable was great in his role of Fletcher CHristian.

      Cheers--C.
      Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..
    • Hi

      I like The Last Rebel or Alleghaney Uprising. I have an old VHS copy issued as one of the Cinema Club series. Unfortunately it misses out the beginning of the film which include the prisoner exchange.

      But for all that its not a bad film.

      Regards

      Arthur.
      Walk Tall - Talk Low
    • Hi

      Talking about the limited number of American Revolution and pre revolutionary film made in Hiollywood. I think the American public at the time were not disposed to watch films covering that period and thats the reason so few were made.

      Two that we haven't included are:

      The Scarlett Coat (1955)

      Directed by John Sturgess it tells the story of the British attempt to capture West Point and the defection of Benedict Arnold. A fine cast included
      Cornel Wilde, Michael Wilding as Major Andre, George Sanders Ann Francis John Mcintire, Bobby Driscoll and Robert Douglas as Benedict Arnold.

      The second picture was the 1959 version of the George Bernard Shaw play The Devils Disciple.

      Directed by Guy Hamilton it starred Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas and Sir Laurence Olivier as Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne. It was in Black and White and panned by the critics.
      About the only line that was of any good was when Olivier is trying to convince Kirk Douglas that he should be hung rather than shot, explaining that with the standard of marksmanship in the British Army most shots would either miss him completely or seriously and painfully wound him, whereas if he were to be hung it would be all over very quickly with no mess.


      Regards

      Arthur

      Walk Tall - Talk Low