They Were Expendable (1945)

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    There are 97 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • Re: Song in They Were Expendable

      Hey, Jen, good to see you again. I posted a welcome back in another thread, but definitely wanted to post here, as I do remember you asking about the song in one of my favorite films. At the time, I searched high and low for it, to no avail, so I'm glad you found an answer. I listened to the Gene Autry clip and ended up buying the 3-disc set! The money is going to a good cause, it's going to support the Western Heritage Museum down in Los Angeles.

      smokey is taking classes, so isn't here very often, but when she comes back, she'll be happy to see you've returned. CHANCE has been busy dealing with "life issues" recently, so hasn't been around too much, but he'll be back. The Baron . . . I don't know what has happened to him. itdo left due to differences regarding political discussion and how they were moderated ( or not). I also think that he was seeking a higher plane of discussion regarding Duke. He was very knowledgeable from a cinematography perspective, and looking for like minds. We do miss him. He also indicated that his job was keeping him busier.

      Chester :newyear:
    • Re: Song in They Were Expendable

      HI Chester:

      I'm glad you liked the Autry discs and that the money is going to a good cause. I hadn't even noticed that.

      I'm sorry to hear about members who aren't around any longer. I agree that itdo was definitely on a different level, which is why I always looked forward to hearing from him. His posts were always very informative and certainly more objective with regard to JW; his thoughts seemed to come from a critical, film-appreciation sort of perspective, and it's always good to have different perspectives. Oh well.

      It always makes me kind of sad when people can't see past their religious or political differences. If I disagreed about something someone here said, I would just choose not to react and let it pass. One of my other great cinematic interests is the musical star Gene Kelly. (I know; he couldn't be much more different from John Wayne, but there you have it.) Though it pains me a bit to say it about someone whose work I admire so much, he was known for being very left-wing and even got accidentally entangled in communism through his first wife, who was far more hard-core liberal than even he was. I used to post quite frequently at a GK forum and occasionally the conversation drifted into politics. I am more right-wing and conservative myself, and I tended to just ignore those conversations. It's not worth getting involved in something ugly, and risk alienating yourself from a great discussion about a common interest. Everyone's entitled to their opinion and I'm not about to change anyone's mind over night, so I let stuff go.

      Just to relate this all to JW, I don't know about any time Duke met with Gene Kelly, though I do know that GK praised him in writing once for how gracefully he moved in spite of (or perhaps because of) his masculinity. He was always trying to prove that dancing could be masculine, and that men who danced should always maintain their masculinity. He didn't like that people always associate dancing with being a sissy.

      Anyway, I digress. Sorry! :blush: Thanks for the update!
    • Re: Song in They Were Expendable

      A Girl Named Jen wrote:

      One of my other great cinematic interests is the musical star Gene Kelly. (I know; he couldn't be much more different from John Wayne, but there you have it.) Though it pains me a bit to say it about someone whose work I admire so much, he was known for being very left-wing and even got accidentally entangled in communism through his first wife, who was far more hard-core liberal than even he was. I used to post quite frequently at a GK forum and occasionally the conversation drifted into politics. I am more right-wing and conservative myself, and I tended to just ignore those conversations. It's not worth getting involved in something ugly, and risk alienating yourself from a great discussion about a common interest. Everyone's entitled to their opinion and I'm not about to change anyone's mind over night, so I let stuff go.

      Just to relate this all to JW, I don't know about any time Duke met with Gene Kelly, though I do know that GK praised him in writing once for how gracefully he moved in spite of (or perhaps because of) his masculinity. He was always trying to prove that dancing could be masculine, and that men who danced should always maintain their masculinity. He didn't like that people always associate dancing with being a sissy.


      I never knew Gene fell on the left side of the political spectrum - in fact, that's the first I'd heard of it. That's what I liked about the older generation of movie stars; they kept their political opinions to themselves. I've read that Burt Lancaster, Gregory Peck and of course
      Paul Newman were/are extremely liberal but you'd never have known it from their movies.

      I've also never thought dancing was sissified - I'd give anything to be able to dance like Gene or Fred could.

      BTW, Jen, Gene has what I think was one of his best movies out on DVD - "The Three Musketeers"
      De gustibus non est disputandum
    • Re: Song in They Were Expendable

      Ah, Stumpy... how great is it that you know about the release of The 3 Ms on DVD (finally)? It's certainly a fun movie, and one of GK's few non-musical films that's a joy to watch and allows him to use his charm. He modeled himself after Douglas Fairbanks in his role as d'Artagnan. It reminds me somewhat of Scaramouche, another fun MGM film from the same time with swashbuckling in it. Stewart Granger is so good in that kind of role.

      I'm glad that you don't see dancing as sissified. A lot of girls would give anything to be able to dance with the two golden era greats.

      Yes, Gene was a lefty, but as you point out, he didn't make a huge deal out of it, along with the other great actors you bring up. He was too smart, and knew better than to alienate at least half of the movie-going public. He did get involved with the HUAC/Joe McCarthy stuff, but at the time, almost everyone in Hollywood did.

      As the famous last line of Some Like It Hot goes, "nobody's perfect."
    • Re: Song in They Were Expendable

      That was the thing with the actors of the past. They just acted for the most part. There politics were there own buisness and they never tried to drag others into a media war. They were respectful enough of each other and never really got into a public war of words.

      The actors of today on another hand think that just because they make movies that they are right in there thinking and that we should listen to them even though most have probably never researched on the stuff they are talking about.
      Life is hard, its even harder when your stupid!!
      -John Wayne
    • Re: Song in They Were Expendable

      SXViper wrote:

      The actors of today on another hand think that just because they make movies that they are right in there thinking and that we should listen to them even though most have probably never researched on the stuff they are talking about.


      I remember an incident in the early eighties that was totally ridiculous. In those days, a lot of family farms were going under because of various circumstances. Congress called Jessica Lange, who had played in a movie about family farms called "Country", to testify about the plight of family farms. She probably didn't know any more about family farming than my 3-year-old granddaughter, who lives in a Dallas suburb. But that was so typical of what passes for our political "leadership".
      De gustibus non est disputandum
    • Re: They Were Expendable (1945)

      Watched this over the Easter Break. After viewing it again I think I appreciate why it didnt set the box office on fire. It has some nice moments but it does seem a bit disjointed for lack of a better word.

      When you consider the running time at 129 minutes which is long for Ford I would have thought that it would have been structured better.

      I think the downbeat ending didnt help either.

      A Fair to Good movie.


      Mike
    • Re: They Were Expendable (1945)

      The Ghost Soldiers is an excellent book. It gives the true perspective of what was going on. Unfortunately we are losing over one thousand WWII Vets per day. Many came home and never told their families about what happened and what they went through. We are losing a large portion of untold history with each passing.

      If you have a dad or a grandfather and you haven't taken the time to ask them about the war, do it before its too late.
      The only time you bow down to someone is when you bend over to help them up!
    • Re: They Were Expendable (1945)

      I can certainly understand why some stories are not being told. I sat down with a WWII vet when I was in the military and the stories he told me ran shivers up my spine. The Japanese treated our guys horribly in their prison camps. Beaten, whipped, starved, dehydrated, manipulated and much more. I can see why many of our old vets won't tell the stories.

      My father-in-law served in WWII, he had a lot of friends that spent time in some of those camps. He hated the Japanese to the day he died. But he did leave me with a funny story that I tell where ever I can.

      He used to run an Old Texaco gas station which he later converted to a NAPA store. There is another business in town, a factory that makes bearings and such for big equipment. The factory saw some hard times about 20 years ago and was eventually bought by the Japanese. Shortly after they bought it, they sent a delegation to our city to check out the plant and to check things out so to speak. It kind of on the edge of town and not easy to find. As they wer driving down the main road they stopped in NAPA store to get directions. They asked my father-in-law: "Where is NTN" With their back accent it took him a couple times to figure out what they were asking. When he did figure it out, he looked at them with a straight face and replied: "You found Pearl Harbor easy enough didn't you?" They didn't say a word, just walked out and drove down the road. True story... I swear!