Two Fisted Law (1932)

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    There are 12 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • Two Fisted Law (1932)

      TWO FISTED LAW

      DIRECTED BY D. ROSS LEDERMAN
      PROUCED BY IRVING BRISKIN
      COLUMBIA PICTURES


      Photo with the courtesy of lasbugas

      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Rancher Tim Clark borrows money from Bob Russell,
      who then rustles Clark's cattle so he will be unable to repay the money.
      Thus Russell is able to cheat Clark out of his ranch.
      Clark becomes a prospector for silver and ultimately comes
      to settle accounts with Russell and crooked deputy Bendix.
      Summary written by Jim Beaver

      Full Cast
      Tim McCoy .... Tim Clark
      Alice Day .... Betty Owen
      Wheeler Oakman .... Bob Russell
      Tully Marshall .... Sheriff Malcolm
      Wallace MacDonald .... Artie
      John Wayne .... Duke
      Walter Brennan .... Deputy Sheriff Bendix
      Richard Alexander .... Zeke Yokum
      Merrill McCormick .... Green, the Agent (uncredited)
      Bud Osborne .... Henchman Juggs Tyler (uncredited)
      Arthur Thalasso ... Bartender Jake (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      Kurt Kempler adaptation and dialogue
      William Colt MacDonald story

      Cinematography
      Benjamin H. Kline

      Filming Locations
      Santa Clarita, California, USA
      Andy Jauregui Ranch, Newhall, California, USA
      Trem Carr Ranch, Newhall, California, USA
      Walker Ranch - 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall, California, USA

      Watch the Full Movie

      Two Fisted Law
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 11 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Two-Fisted Law is a 1932 American romantic B-Western film directed by D. Ross Lederman
      and starring Tim McCoy and John Wayne.
      The picture also features Walter Brennan, Alice Day, Wheeler Oakman,
      Tully Marshall,
      and Wallace MacDonald.

      The second Tim McCoy film, which was a Columbia relegation for Duke,
      This oater featuring Tim, who in my opinion,
      was the most ridiculous looking cowboy star,
      if ever there was one.
      With over-acting hams like Tim around, Duke couldn't fail!!!
      At least we had Walter Brennan, to show us, how to act!!

      Duke was billed even lower than the first, a lowly 6th!!!
      His screen time was only 5:37, and is only visible
      in 4 scenes! Duke doesn't appear at all, in the last 23 minutes,
      of this 57 minute film.

      His delivery of dialogue, however, was improving.
      Things were getting worse, but they were about to get better.

      User Review
      Saving Little Nell
      11 February 2007 | by bkoganbing (Buffalo, New York)
      Though in the film John Wayne is second billed to star Tim McCoy he actually has very little to do. Wayne is in the unaccustomed role of sidekick.

      Wayne and Wallace MacDonald are the last two ranch hands working for Tim McCoy. He's lost is ranch to crooked banker Wheeler Oakman, but being the good boss and friend he is to Wayne and MacDonald he finds them jobs with neighbor and sweetheart Alice Day.

      That might be short term employment for Oakman has designs on the ranch and on Day. Those designs on Day ain't covered by the cowboy code.

      McCoy goes off prospecting for a couple of years and no sooner is he back than he's framed for an express company holdup and killing resulting from same. The rest of the movie is McCoy's fight to prove his innocence and save Day from a fate worse than death.

      Wheeler Oakman seems to be enjoying his role as villain, he's hamming it up in the best Snidely Whiplash tradition. And Day makes a perfect Little Nell.

      Tim McCoy, a silent western star, seems to have made the transition to sound easily enough. He's a stern and upright hero who's bound and determined prove his innocence.

      Note good performances by Tully Marshall as the father figure sheriff of the area who believes in McCoy and a young Walter Brennan as his less than scrupulous deputy.

      My VHS of this film is 58 minutes and I note that the running time is 64 minutes. That might explain some gaps in the story and maybe it was John Wayne who got cut out.

      This was the last Columbia movie that John Wayne ever appeared in. It seems as though Harry Cohn thought Wayne was putting the moves on a young starlet who rejected Cohn's advances even though Wayne wasn't involved. But after the Duke became a star and a legend, there wasn't enough money in the world that would get him to appear in a Columbia Studios film.

      But realizing this is a B western, it's not the worst one I've ever seen although somehow I doubt we'll ever see a director's cut.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Originally posted by ethanedwards@Jan 27 2006, 05:53 PM
      Hi,
      The second Tim McCoy film, which was a  Columbia relegation for Duke,
      This oater featuring Tim, who in my opinion,
      was the most ridiculous looking cowboy star,
      if ever there was one.
      With over-acting hams like Tim around, Duke couldn't fail!!!
      At least we had Walter Brennan, to show us, how to act!!
      Duke was billed even lower than the first, a lowly 6th!!!
      His screen time was only 5:37, and is only visible
      in 4 scenes! Duke doesn't appear at all, in the last 23 minutes,
      of this 57 minute film.
      His delivery of dialogue, however, was improving.
      Things were getting worse, but they were about to get better.
      Rating 3/10
      [snapback]26050[/snapback]



      Rating 0/10 would be more like it. Except for that I agree. This is by far the worst John Wayne film I have seen, and it's not because I have to have John Wayne in every scene, because I don't. I usually get a kick out of watching the old b-movies despite their obvious flaws, but this one was just painful to watch. It seemed like 57 hours not 57 minutes.

      Regards
      Popol Vuh

    • To my opinion Duke's B-movies are much better then others. For example Jene Autry (I always like the music but the plot are always silly and Autry himself very unnatural) and Roy Rodgers. Two Fisted Law was of course McCoy movie, it explains all faults.
      :rolleyes:

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