The Shepherd Of The Hills (1941)

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    There are 84 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • The Shepherd Of The Hills (1941)

      THE SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS

      DIRECTED BY HENRY HATHAWAY
      PRODUCED BY JACK MOSS
      PARAMOUNT PICTURES


      Photo with the courtesy of lasbugas

      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Young Matt Masters, an Ozark Mountains moonshiner, hates the father he has never seen,
      who apparently deserted Matt's mother and left her to die.
      His obsession contributes to the hatred rampant in the mountains.
      However, the arrival of a stranger, Daniel Howitt,
      begins to positively affect the mountain people, who learn to shed
      their hatred under his gentle influence. Still, Matt does not quite trust Howitt.....
      Summary written by Jim Beaver

      Full Cast
      John Wayne .... Young Matt
      Betty Field .... Sammy Lane
      Harry Carey .... Daniel Howitt
      Beulah Bondi .... Aunt Mollie
      James Barton .... Old Matt
      Samuel S. Hinds .... Andy Beeler
      Marjorie Main .... Granny Becky
      Ward Bond .... Wash Gibbs
      Marc Lawrence .... Pete
      John Qualen .... Coot Royal
      Fuzzy Knight .... Mr. Palestrom
      Tom Fadden .... Jim Lane
      Olin Howland .... Corky
      Dorothy Adams .... Elvy
      Virita Campbell .... Baby
      Fern Emmett .... Mrs. Palestrom
      Hank Bell .... Man with mustache (uncredited)
      Henry Brandon .... Bald Knobber (uncredited)
      Jim Corey .... Bald Knobber (uncredited)
      William Haade .... Bald Knobber (uncredited)
      John Harmon .... Charles, the deputy (uncredited)
      Selmer Jackson .... Doctor (uncredited)
      Carl Knowles .... Revenuer (uncredited)
      Bob Kortman .... Bald Knobber (uncredited)
      Charles Middleton .... Blacksmith (uncredited)
      Robert Shayne ... Undetermined Minor Role (unconfirmed) (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      Stuart Anthony
      Grover Jones
      Harold Bell Wright story (novel)

      Original Music
      Gerard Carbonara

      Cinematography
      W. Howard Greene
      Charles Lang

      Trivia
      John Wayne's first film in Technicolor.

      One of over 700 Paramount Productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949,
      which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution,
      and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since.

      Goofs
      * Continuity: About 13 minutes before the end of the movie,
      when Young Matt leaves the house where Old Matt, Aunt Mollie and Sammy
      are tending to Pete after Pete was shot, Sammy follows, shutting and latching the door behind her.
      A few minutes later when Old Matt leaves, the door is standing wide open.

      * Factual errors: It would be quite impossible for Granny Becky (who has been blind her entire life)
      to be able to instantly recognize the familial similarities between
      Young Matt and Old Matt right after her eye bandages were removed.

      Memorable Quote

      Filming Locations
      Big Bear Lake, Big Bear Valley, San Bernardino National Forest, California, USA
      Branson, Missouri, USA
      Cedar Lake, Big Bear Valley, San Bernardino National Forest, California, USA
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 10 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • The Shepherd of the Hills is a 1941 American drama film starring John Wayne,
      Betty Field
      and Harry Carey.
      The supporting cast includes Beulah Bondi, Ward Bond, Marjorie Main and John Qualen.

      The director was Henry Hathaway, who directed several other Wayne films
      including True Grit almost three decades later.

      Filmed on location at Big Bear, Duke began work on this film,
      accompanied by Marlene Deitrich, who stayed, at a hotel near the lake, Naughty Duke !!!!!
      The film was based on Harold Bell Wright's best selling novel of 1907.
      It was Duke's first film in Technicolor.
      Duke worked well with Henry Hathaway, considering in these early days,
      he was pretty scathing about Duke's acting abilities.
      However, they must have worked things out, as he was to eventually win Duke his only Academy Award!!

      Henry Hathaway said
      Wayne, never was an actor...and because, he wasn't an actor, he had to do everything real..
      There wasn't anything in Duke,that would allow him to pretend he was something.
      He couldn't be French, he couldn't have an accent, he couldn't be Olivier.
      Whatever the actor was called to do in the script, he did it.
      It wasn't a question of acting, it was a question of reality

      Harry Carey, his hero, played a very apt Father,
      with a fine cast of, Beulah Bondi, Marjorie Main, and Ward Bond, supporting.

      I like this film very much and thought it almost seemed to touch on some sort of cult.
      When watching it, I felt transported, into some mysterious, insular, backwater world,
      where everyone spoke strangely, I think Beulah, and Marjorie, as they said in the film,
      "Put the hecks on me"

      Critics, found the story dated, too sentimental and sweet, and full of platitudes.
      However, when the film opened, it was a big production, from a big studio,
      and served as another boost in Duke's career.

      User Review
      Author: telegonus from brighton, ma.From IMDb
      The Henry Hathaway-directed 1941 Shepherd Of the Hills is worth seeing if for nothing else its color,
      which is as glorious and gorgeous as one will find in a film. Each outdoor shot is like a landscape painting.
      Along with Gone With the Wind and The Four Feathers, this is the finest use of color I have seen in a movie, and it should be used as a textbook on how to shoot a film in color. Otherwise, the picture is just a pleasing and old-fashioned revenge tale, adapted from a now forgotten novel, and set in the Ozark Mountains at about the turn of the twentieth century.
      It is nicely written in the idiom of the mountain folk, and features John Wayne in an early, rare non-western role,
      which he handles proficiently. Betty Field is his spunky love interest in what would now be an Amy Madigan part.
      Miss Field is lovely in a non-conventional way; she shines as never before or since.*
      The combination of her quiet, almost mousy beauty in an otherwise talky, assertive role is fascinating to watch.*
      Also on hand are Beulah Bondi, Ward Bond, Marc Lawrence, who gives an amazing performance,
      and Harry Carey, whose pleasantness and plainness I find tiring, though I suppose he's well-cast.
      There's a ritualistic feeling to the film, with its clearly defined notions of good and evil,
      the almost formally informal dialect the characters use, the leisurely, strolling pace by which the story unfolds,*
      all contribute to its pastoral quality. The chief problem is that there's no suspense.*
      One senses early on how the thing is going to end, and the characters behave as one would expect.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Hi all,
      This movie certainly deserved a bigger descussion. Ever time I watch it - I found it more and more enjoying. What is good in it is a very quiet athmosphere and beautiful landscapes. It is some magic in this movie which is hard to catch in words.
      I shall watch it again this evening and try to write more to put my two cents worth. :)

      Regards,
      Senta :rolleyes:
      Files
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    • Originally posted by ethanedwards@Feb 14 2006, 04:55 AM

      I like this film very much and thought it almost seemed to touch on some sort of cult. When watching it, I felt transported, into some mysterious, insular, backwater world, where everyone spoke strangely.

      Well said, Keith! I felt the same way about this film. I often find myself unable to put into words what I think. You captured it. I love this film because I feel it takes me back into the story. I love the Ozarks. And something about Betty Fields draws you to her. She did an enchanting job with this part.
      For those of you who also like to read, I highly recommend the book. The story line is similar, with a few changes. It is well written and hard to put down. This film will always be in my top ten.

      Mark
      Files
      "I couldn't go to sleep at night if the director didn't call 'cut'. "
    • Originally posted by ethanedwards@Feb 14 2006, 11:55 AM
      Critics, found the story dated, too sentimental and sweet, and full of platitudes.

      For once I have to agree with the critics. When I watched this I had great expectations since a lot of people had been expressing their longing for this movie to be released on DVD. It's not too bad, but I didn't really feel the need to see it again.

      Regards
      Popol Vuh
    • Originally posted by Popol Vuh@Oct 25 2006, 08:34 PM
      For once I have to agree with the critics. When I watched this I had great expectations since a lot of people had been expressing their longing for this movie to be released on DVD. It's not too bad, but I didn't really feel the need to see it again.

      Regards
      Popol Vuh
      [snapback]36353[/snapback]



      Hi Popol Vuh,
      I feel exactly in opposite way. I know that the storyline isn't great and may be dated , but it is so big joy to watch the sceenes, I remember this movie not because of scenes but because of beautifully shoot and composed scenes. The first one - were Sammy sings to protect her father, when Harrey Carey came first to Sarah's home, when they meet with Duke in the medow in the final, Duke listening to his Dad and Sammy speaking and the very final with landscapes with sheep and sun through trees, very religios mooded if I can say so. Each part of this movie are shoot like an art work, so it is sure is som static in the whole. But I always catch myself on the thought that I want even slower pace to enjoy each moment. This is the magic of the film and at the same time it is a fault of it becouse it is not for people who enjoy thrilling action.
      Regards,
      Senta :rolleyes:
    • While I enjoyed this movie, I don't feel drawn to watch it again. I've seen it three or four times. There are great performances by Harry Carey, John Wayne and others. But for some reason, I haven't felt compelled to watch it more often. That's one thing about John Wayne movies, they affect different folks differently, which is why they are so popular - what one person doesn't like, someone else will (and vice versa) :D .

      Chester :newyear:
    • What an extraordinary piece of a forgotten work! The acting of especially Betty Field, but some others too, is manic, giving the movie an electrified atmosphere which is balanced by delicate cinematography of the landscape. Duke is somewhat out-of-place in the company, but as he's portraying a young mislead guy, it's ok
      I don't believe in surrenders.
    • Help!

      Well the family and I all settled down to watch this fine movie for the first time last night - I had Tivoed it several months ago - and we got down to the big conclusion where JW is lying on the bed after he's been operated on and his dad has just explained why he left and why he shot his son cause he would rather kill him than see him go to prison like he had done when the *(&%$# thing stopped. It just stopped and didn't record to the end of the movie!

      I don't mean to spoil it for anyone who hasn't seen the movie but would someone please put me out of my misery and tell me what happens next?!

      How does the movie end?

      Thanks!
      Tbone


      "I have tried to live my life so that my family would love me and my friends respect me. The others can do whatever the hell they please."
    • Well good, thanks Keith!

      I have to say I enjoyed this film very much. It has a good message namely that hate and evil will kill you.

      I liked how the good and the bad were portrayed in this film and I liked seeing Duke's character trying to work through it.

      And for those of you who thought you were getting some kind of peek into a vanishing subculture, well you were.

      I've met true hillbillies, as we used to call them. They were wise in the ways of their world yet recognized and, to some degree, feared the outside world whose values they did not identify with or understand.

      They valued their place in the world, their homes, their families, their hills.

      We could learn a thing or two from them.
      Tbone


      "I have tried to live my life so that my family would love me and my friends respect me. The others can do whatever the hell they please."