Without Reservations (1946)

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    There are 84 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • Originally posted by chester7777@Feb 25 2006, 05:54 AM
      . . . it seems it has been well discussed on this board in the past.
      [snapback]27922[/snapback]

      Well, perhaps not well discussed, but a few people had good things to say about it -

      post by AEC23

      another mention by AEC23 in "most underrated Duke movies"

      some interest and discussion in The Trading Post, from 2003

      Chester :newyear:
    • Hi all,
      It seems there was opposite opinions about this movie. I think it is more womans movie. And it is funny to see how literary minded woman imagine the ideal man to herself and when meet the one - Duke of course and find some things very different. I like many lines from the movie, but I had it on VHS (without subtitels), so afraid to post it to avoid mistakes.
      Regards,
      Vera :rolleyes:
    • Originally posted by ethanedwards@Feb 23 2006, 12:18 PM
      . . . I thought . . . the chemistry was non-existent.
      [snapback]27832[/snapback]

      I think there was a chemistry there, but it got turned on and off like a water faucet, and we particularly didn't care for the way Duke's character was so easily swayed by "a new skirt" - that was disheartening.

      Originally posted by falc04@Feb 25 2006, 04:16 AM
      The 'aeroplane' scene on the train, where Miss Klotz is drunk is pain-inducing to watch.
      [snapback]27921[/snapback]

      I would have to agree, this particular scene was wildly contrived, but I guess she had to do something to get in trouble and thrown off the train.

      Overall, we enjoyed the movie. It would probably rank a 6 out of 10 in our book.

      Chester :newyear:
    • Re: Without Reservations (1946)

      The first poster is like the one posted in Keith's introductory post, and the second is a 1953 reissue poster.
      Files
    • Re: Without Reservations (1946)

      First, let me start off by saying I have always disliked this film. The plot is beyond juvenile and the lead actors were much too old to be playing the poorly written characters they were portraying in the story.

      Seeing as I just received the new Warner box set, and that this film was included, I decided to see if time away from it had somehow made it a better movie. And do you know what I found...it's still a turkey! You know a movie is bad, when you keep checking the time to see how much longer it'll be before it ends. Claudette Colbert's every line delivery has a wine to it, that just gets under your skin (ooooohhhhhhh, Russssttttttty). And when was the last time an author of a book was treated like Queen Elizabeth. The film just goes on-and-on-and-on-and-on, and nothing ever happens.

      This one is so bad, I can't ever imagine another time when I'll look thru all my Duke DVDs, and want to watch this one again.
    • Re: Without Reservations (1946)

      falc04 wrote:

      First, let me start off by saying I have always disliked this film. The plot is beyond juvenile and the lead actors were much too old to be playing the poorly written characters they were portraying in the story.

      Seeing as I just received the new Warner box set, and that this film was included, I decided to see if time away from it had somehow made it a better movie. And do you know what I found...it's still a turkey! You know a movie is bad, when you keep checking the time to see how much longer it'll be before it ends. Claudette Colbert's every line delivery has a wine to it, that just gets under your skin (ooooohhhhhhh, Russssttttttty). And when was the last time an author of a book was treated like Queen Elizabeth. The film just goes on-and-on-and-on-and-on, and nothing ever happens.

      This one is so bad, I can't ever imagine another time when I'll look thru all my Duke DVDs, and want to watch this one again.

      Hi Falc,
      That you totally dislike this movie I understand quite well - my opinion is totally opposite, so it is nothing to descuss. What interests me - is DVD version is worth buying (I have this movie at VHS) and are there any features in this collection?
      Regards,
      Senta
    • Re: Without Reservations (1946)

      Senta wrote:

      Hi Falc,
      That you totally dislike this movie I understand quite well - my opinion is totally opposite, so it is nothing to descuss. What interests me - is DVD version is worth buying (I have this movie at VHS) and are there any features in this collection?
      Regards,
      Senta


      Hi Senta,

      The DVD does have some minor extras, but nothing in connection with the film. For what it's worth, the transfer is fairly sharp, so if your a fan of the film (which it appears you are), then I do not believe you'd be disappointed with purchasing it.

      And let me say, out of all the films Duke made during his long career, I could count the number of unwatchable ones on one hand. This just happens to be one of them (along with Reunion In France and Lady For A Night).
    • Re: Without Reservations (1946)

      Hi Falc,
      Thank you for the information. I'm planning to buy the whole collection - two of the titels I never seen (Trouble along the Way and Reunion in France), others I have mostly on VHS.
      May be I shall like Reunion in France too?
      Regards,
      Senta
    • Re: Without Reservations (1946)

      After watching this movie I realize why I only watched it one other time so long ago on VHS. It was a weak movie that was cute but had no substance. I'm not sure if it would get better, and I thought that Duke did his best to make it work, but the script and story line was not good. It is obvious that the cameos from Cary Grant and Jack Benny was put in to give it a little strength, but it just didn't take off. It is almost like Planes, Trains & Automobiles but worse. I know that most of you would say to Duke back then to stick with westerns and war movies.

      I will watch this movie again, but it may be a long time when I forget about it. This is a part of the collection that came out last month.

      Cheers :cool:


      "When you come slam bang up against trouble, it never looks half as bad if you face up to it"
      - John Wayne quote
    • Re: Without Reservations (1946)

      Hi Mike


      1946 I would imagine it was around about this time that Duke was finally emerging from his spell of being the beefcake for the female stars like Joan Crawford and Claudette Colbert two years later he was starring in his own right.


      Regards

      Arthur
      Walk Tall - Talk Low