I Married A Woman (1958)

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    There are 28 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • I Married A Woman (1958)

      I MARRIED A WOMAN

      DIRECTED BY HAL KANTER
      PRODUCED BY WILLIAM BLOOM
      GOMALCO PRODUCTION
      RKO RADIO PICTURES


      Photo with the courtesy of lasbugas

      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Advertising executive Marshall Briggs finds his work in conflict
      with his love-life with fashion model Janice Blake.

      Full Cast
      George Gobel .... Marshall 'Mickey' Briggs
      Diana Dors .... Janice Blake Briggs aka Miss Luxembourg
      Adolphe Menjou .... Frederick W. Sutton
      Jessie Royce Landis .... Marshall's Mother-in-law
      Nita Talbot .... Miss Anderson, Briggs' Secretary
      William Redfield .... Eddie Benson, Elevator Operator
      Stephen Dunne .... Bob Sanders
      John McGiver .... Girard, Sutton's Lawyer
      Steve Pendleton .... Photographer trailing Briggs
      Stanley Adams .... Cabbie (uncredited)
      Suzanne Alexander .... Camera Girl (uncredited)
      Suzanne Ames .... Luxembourg Girl (uncredited)
      Kay Buckley .... Camera girl (uncredited)
      Jeanne Carmen .... Woman (uncredited)
      Harry Cheshire .... Texan at Phone Booth (uncredited)
      John C. Daly .... Young Law Clerk (uncredited)
      Angie Dickinson .... Evelyn, Leonard's Wife in Film Clip (uncredited)
      Joan Dixon .... Mrs. John Wayne (uncredited)
      Bess Flowers .... Pageant Woman (uncredited)
      Paul Gary .... Doorman (uncredited)
      Louise Glenn .... Camera Girl (uncredited)
      Richard Grant .... Photographer (uncredited)
      Marilyn Hanold .... Luxembourg Girl (uncredited)
      Marie Harmon .... Bridesmaid (uncredited)
      Sam Harris .... Extra in Technicolor Clip (uncredited)
      Don C. Harvey .... Announcer (uncredited)
      Kenner G. Kemp .... Nightclub Extra (uncredited)
      Sam Lee .... Elevator Repairman (uncredited)
      Lou Lubin .... Tailor (uncredited)
      Sidney Marion .... Waiter (uncredited)
      Ann McCrea .... Luxembourg Girl (uncredited)
      Cheerio Meredith .... Mrs. Wilkins, Woman on Elevator (uncredited)
      Gloria Moreland .... Miss Fredericks (uncredited)
      Mary Morlas .... Bridesmaid (uncredited)
      Jack Mulhall .... Old Cop (uncredited)
      Jack Pepper .... Crawford (uncredited)
      Joe Ploski .... Bit Man (uncredited)
      Mabel Rea .... Camera Girl (uncredited)
      Dick Ryan .... Official (uncredited)
      Al Shaw .... TV Repairman (uncredited)
      Charles Tannen .... Young Cop (uncredited)
      Julius Tannen .... Tim Smith, Sutton Advertising (uncredited)
      John Wayne .... John Wayne/Leonard (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      Goodman Ace

      Original Music
      Cyril J. Mockridge

      Cinematography
      Lucien Ballard

      Trivia
      Filmed between mid-July and late August 1956, the movie's run in Los Angeles began on May 14, 1958.

      Goofs
      Unknown

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Unknown
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 9 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • I Married a Woman is a 1958 American comedy film made in 1956,
      starring George Gobel and Diana Dors.
      The movie also features John Wayne in a cameo role as himself.
      It was filmed in RKO-Scope and black and white except
      for one of Wayne's two scenes, which was shot in Technicolor.
      The film's original title was "So There You Are".

      A strange film this one, and it's funny, because it's so bad.
      I don't agree, with the quote below, as I don't think this film is funny
      in a humorous way.
      The humour is dated now, but what they found to laugh at then, I don't know.
      It's a black and white film, starring George Gobel and Diana Dors.
      Duke appeared, as himself in a scene, with Angie Dickinson,
      as his hen pecking wife.

      This scene and a brief montage, on a cinema screen at the end,
      were screened in colour.

      Anyway, I thought it was dreadful

      User Review
      Author: David (Handlinghandel) from NY, NY from IMDb

      This is probably more fun now than it was when it came out.
      It's a bit of black and white nostalgia now.*
      Then, it was a showpiece for George Gobel, improbably married to sexbomb Diana Dors -- I guess that was the "joke."
      Jessie Royce Landis is fun, as always, and the supporting cast supports very well.
      It's by no means awful. It's kind of a man's fantasy about being a wimp who's adored by a gorgeous girl --*
      not unlike the better and better known "Seven Year Itch."
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Originally posted by ethanedwards@Feb 21 2006, 03:49 AM
      Anyway, I thought it was dreadful
      Rating 1/10
      [snapback]27689[/snapback]

      OUCH! Is this the lowest rating you have "awarded" a Duke film so far?

      It's not very available. Bygone Video offers what they deem to be a "fair" version of it, for $14.95 plus shipping.

      Chester :newyear:
    • Hi Chester,

      To be fair, this isn't really a Duke film, as he was in a cameo role,
      however, that segment, was pretty corny, and on it's own
      it is only worth 3/10.

      However, there were two more films, I rated as poor,

      The Conqueror 1/10,

      and here's one better Jim,

      The Greatest Story Ever Told 0/10

      now that's two more Ouch's
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England
    • Originally posted by ethanedwards+Feb 23 2006, 02:02 AM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(ethanedwards @ Feb 23 2006, 02:02 AM)</div>
      To be fair, this isn't really a Duke film, as he was in a cameo role . . .
      however, that segment, was pretty corny, and on it's own
      it is only worth 3/10.
      [snapback]27780[/snapback]
      [/b]


      True, it isn't a Duke film, but for the fanatic who desires a copy of any film in which he appeared (for however short a time), it counts. Of course, it is nice if the film is one worth watching <_< .

      <!--QuoteBegin-ethanedwards
      @Feb 23 2006, 02:02 AM
      However, there were two more films, I rated as poor,

      [b]The Conqueror
        1/10,

      and here's one better Jim,

      The Greatest Story Ever Told 0/10

      now that's two more Ouch's
      [snapback]27780[/snapback]
      [/b]

      Oh, yeah . . . forgot about those . . . . :rolleyes:

      Chester :newyear:
    • Re: I Married A Woman (1958)

      I've never found a decent copy of this film, and ended up settling for a used VHS copy of the film. If it were not for the scenes of John Wayne, I am pretty certain I would have never looked for the film nor have it in my collection.