Winton C. Hoch

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    There are 9 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Hawkswill.

    • Winton C. Hoch

      WINTON C. HOCH

      Information from IMDb

      Date of Birth
      31 July 1905, Storm Lake, Iowa, USA

      Date of Death
      20 March 1979, Santa Monica, California, USA

      Nickname
      Winnie

      Mini Biography
      Winton Hoch, A.S.C. was originally a lab technician who contributed to the development of Technicolor before becoming a cinematographer in 1936. His understanding of the colour process quickly led to him being hailed as one of Hollywood's premier colour cinematographers.

      He won a Technical Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1940 for his contributions to the development of new improved Process Projection Equipment.

      This was followed with back-to-back Academy Awards for the expensive religious epic Joan of Arc in 1948, and then the elegiac John Ford Western She Wore a Yellow Ribbon in 1949 (an achievement that went unmatched until John Toll picked up Oscars for Legends of the Fall in 1994 and Braveheart in 1995).

      He received his third Oscar in 1952 for another collaboration with John Ford, this time on the film, The Quiet Man, which made him the only cinematographer to share an Oscar with a credited second unit cinematographer, Archie Stout, A.S.C.
      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Trivia
      Was the first of only two cinematographers--
      the other being John Toll--to win back-to-back Oscars.
      His were for Victor Fleming's Joan of Arc (1948)
      and John Ford's She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949).

      Is also the only cinematographer to share an Oscar with a credited second unit cinematographer, Archie Stout, for John Ford's The Quiet Man (1952).

      Last name pronounced "Hoke" or "Huke" (accounts differ), but not "Hock."

      Member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).

      His father, Augustus Hoch, holds a U.S. patent for a machine he invented to make cement blocks, eliminating handmaking them.

      Educated at the California Institute of Technology. He became a color specialist for the Technicolor corporation, working to develop their three color system.

      Filmography
      Cinematographer:
      1. Aliens from Another Planet (1982) (TV)
      2. Necromancy (1972)
      ... aka A Life for a Life
      ... aka Rosemary's Disciples (USA: video title)
      ... aka The Toy Factory
      ... aka The Witching (USA: reissue title)
      3. "Nanny and the Professor" (14 episodes, 1970)
      - Nanny and the Smoke-Filled Room (1970) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - A Fowl Episode (1970) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - The Philosopher's Stone (1970) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - An Element of Risk (1970) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - The Games Families Play (1970) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      (9 more)
      4. "The Banana Splits Adventure Hour" (1968) TV series (as Winton Hoch)
      ... aka The Banana Splits and Friends Show (USA: syndication title)
      5. The Green Berets (1968) (director of photography)
      6. "The Time Tunnel" (30 episodes, 1966-1967)
      - Town of Terror (1967) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - Raiders from Outer Space (1967) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - The Kidnappers (1967) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - Merlin the Magician (1967) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - Attack of the Barbarians (1967) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      (25 more)
      7. "Lost in Space" (4 episodes, 1966)
      - Follow the Leader (1966) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - A Change of Space (1966) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - All That Glitters (1966) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      - No Place to Hide (????) TV episode (as Winton Hoch)
      8. "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" (50 episodes, 1964-1966)
      - The Return of the Phantom (1966) TV episode
      - The Mechanical Man (1966) TV episode
      - The Menfish (1966) TV episode
      - The Monster's Web (1966) TV episode
      - The Death Ship (1966) TV episode
      (45 more)
      9. Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1964)
      10. Five Weeks in a Balloon (1962)
      11. Sergeants 3 (1962)
      12. Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) (director of photography) (as Winton Hoch)
      13. The Lost World (1960) (director of photography) (as Winton Hoch)
      ... aka Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World (USA: complete title)
      14. The Big Circus (1959) (director of photography) (as Winton Hoch)
      15. This Earth Is Mine (1959) (as Winton Hoch)
      16. Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959) (director of photography)
      ... aka The Little People (USA)
      17. "Disneyland" (1 episode, 1959)
      ... aka Disney's Wonderful World (USA: new title)
      ... aka The Disney Sunday Movie (USA: new title)
      ... aka The Magical World of Disney (USA: new title)
      ... aka The Wonderful World of Disney (USA: new title)
      ... aka Walt Disney (USA: new title)
      ... aka Walt Disney Presents (USA: new title)
      ... aka Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color (USA: new title)
      - I Captured the King of the Leprechauns (1959) TV episode (director of photography)
      18. The Young Land (1959) (director of photography)
      19. The Missouri Traveler (1958)
      20. Jet Pilot (1957)
      21. The Searchers (1956)
      22. Mister Roberts (1955) (as Winton Hoch)
      23. Return to Paradise (1953)
      24. The Redhead from Wyoming (1953) (as Winton Hoch)
      25. The Quiet Man (1952)
      26. Bird of Paradise (1951)
      27. Halls of Montezuma (1950) (director of photography)
      28. The Sundowners (1950) (director of photography)
      ... aka Thunder in the Dust (UK)
      29. She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949) (as Winton Hoch)
      30. Tulsa (1949) (as Winton Hoch)
      31. 3 Godfathers (1948) (director of photography) (as Winton Hoch)
      32. So Dear to My Heart (1948)
      33. Joan of Arc (1948) (as Winton Hoch) (Technicolor photographer)
      34. Tap Roots (1948)
      35. Beautiful Banff and Lake Louise (1946) (as W.C. Hoch)
      36. Over the Andes (1944)
      37. Dive Bomber (1941)
      38. Beautiful Budapest (1938)
      39. Czechoslovakia on Parade (1938)
      40. Natural Wonders of the West (1938)
      41. Land of the Incas (1937)
      42. India on Parade: A FitzPatrick Traveltalk (1937)
      ... aka India on Parade (USA: short title)
      43. Glimpses of Java and Ceylon (1937)
      ... aka Glimpses of Java and Ceylon: A FitzPatrick Traveltalk (USA: long title)
      44. Copenhagen (1937)
      45. Colorful Bombay (1937)
      46. Hong Kong: 'The Hub of the Orient' (1937)
      47. Serene Siam (1937)
      48. Stockholm: Pride of Sweden (1937)
      49. Rio de Janeiro: City of Splendour (1936) (as Winton Hoch)
      50. Quaint Quebec (1936) (as Winton Hoch)
      51. Victoria and Vancouver: Gateways to Canada (1936)
      ... aka James A. FitzPatrick's Traveltalks: Victoria and Vancouver: Gateways to Canada (USA: series title)
      52. Yellowstone Park: 'Nature's Playground' - A FitzPatrick Traveltalk (1936) (as Winton Hoch)

      Camera and Electrical Department:

      1. Melody Time (1948) (photography: live action)
      2. Captains of the Clouds (1942) (aerial photographer)
      3. The Reluctant Dragon (1941) (director of photography: Technicolor sequences) (as Winton Hoch)
      ... aka A Day at Disneys (USA: TV title)
      ... aka Behind the Scenes at Walt Disney Studio
      4. Dr. Cyclops (1940) (associate director of photography) (as Winton Hoch)
      ... aka Doctor Cyclops (USA: poster title)
      5. Vogues of 1938 (1937) (chief camera operator: Technicolor) (uncredited)
      ... aka All This and Glamour Too
      ... aka Vogues (USA: TV title)
      ... aka Walter Wanger's Vogues of 1938 (USA: complete title)

      Miscellaneous Crew:

      1. Gone with the Wind (1939) (consultant: Technicolor Color Company) (uncredited)
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 8 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: Duke's Cinematographers- Winton C. Hoch

      Cinematographers, were responsible for putting the magic
      onto the silver screen, and without them, the spectacle would never be!

      Four such men,
      William H. Clothier, Archie Stout, Winton Hoch and Bert Glennon
      were without doubt very special to Duke and his movies.
      Clothier and Hoch, more or less took over the mantle,
      from Stout, for the years after!

      William Hoch (Pronounced Hoke or Huke!)
      was one of only two Cinematographers to win
      back to back, Academy Awards, two of which were with Duke,
      She Wore A Yellow Ribbon and The Quiet Man,
      the other being for the 1948 epic Joan Of Arc.
      He was also involved with more recent blockbusters, like Braveheart


      The Green Berets

      William Hoch was Director Of Photography in 6 movies with Duke:-
      The Green Berets (1968)
      Jet Pilot (1957)
      The Searchers (1956)
      The Quiet Man (1952)
      She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
      3 Godfathers (1948)

      In She Wore A Yellow Ribbon,
      the atmosphere of frontier army life has never been
      more beautifully evoked on film.
      The scene of the cavalrymen leading their mounts
      through a storm, with lightning flsahes,
      in an awesome sky, became a classic moment in cinema history
      and helped win William Hoch, an Academy Award.
      It was also a first, in the fact, that Archie Stout,
      the Second Unit man, also picked up an Oscar.

      There is also no doubting, in the way
      that Hoch captured the beautiful scenery of Ireland,
      helping make The Quiet Man a truly wonderful picture,
      although it was not an easy task.
      Hoch said that during the six weeks of shooting,
      there were only six days of intermittant sunshine,
      the rest being rainy and overcast.
      Hoch spent most of the day with his back to the actors,,
      while he checked his light meter.
      John Ford remarked:-
      Never employ a cameraman, to direct a film,
      because he never sees what's going on.

      His Cinematography in The Searchers, I think
      is some of the most beautifully stunning, in any movie I've seen

      During the classic scene with Duke and Harry Carey Jr.
      in The Searchers, Ward Bond accidently pulled out the camera plug,
      causing the camera stop halfway through the vital scene.

      Ford lit up a cigar,
      and noticed mumbling and commotion in the background.
      Then Hoch came up to him, and sheepishly confessed:-
      The camera stopped Mr. Ford....it just stopped running.

      A hush descended on the set, but unpredictably Ford was calm,
      and asked them to re-do the scene, and it became
      one of the most memorable scenes in movie history.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 18 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: Cinematographer

      Very true, Arthur as shown in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon where Winton Hoch won the Oscar for best color cinematography after vehemently protesting the shooting of the calvary scene marching in a very real lightning and thunderstorm.
      John Ford knew his stuff. I imagine that one scene alone, not to mention the many others "manufactured" by Ford to suggest the Remington type paintings, were a major part in Hoch's award. Just hope he realized it wasn't all him. Although with his protest in writing....the rest of us most certainly did, LOL!

      arthurarnell wrote:

      Hi Robbie

      The cinematographer is responsible for photographing the film. If he is one of the greats like Winton Hoch William Clothier, Bert Glennon and many more he can turn a bad film into a good one with his lighting technique and a good film into a stunning one.

      If however you worked for a director like John Ford and you were wise, you tended to do as the director told you without arguement.

      Regards

      Arthur
    • Re: Cinematographer

      Very true, Arthur as shown in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon where Winton Hoch won the Oscar for best color cinematography after vehemently protesting the shooting of the calvary scene marching in a very real lightning and thunderstorm.
      John Ford knew his stuff. I imagine that one scene alone, not to mention the many others "manufactured" by Ford to suggest the Remington type paintings, were a major part in Hoch's award. Just hope he realized it wasn't all him. Although with his protest in writing....the rest of us most certainly did, LOL!

      arthurarnell wrote:

      Hi Robbie

      The cinematographer is responsible for photographing the film. If he is one of the greats like Winton Hoch William Clothier, Bert Glennon and many more he can turn a bad film into a good one with his lighting technique and a good film into a stunning one.

      If however you worked for a director like John Ford and you were wise, you tended to do as the director told you without arguement.

      Regards

      Arthur
    • Re: Cinematographer

      may2 wrote:

      Harry Carey Jr. said in his book that Hoch did not protest filming in the storm at all. Ford just made that up.


      Yes, Dobe did make a mention of that. However, as great as Dobe's book is, he did get a few things mixed up. I laughed out loud and cried in some places. Fantastic book.

      It is written in many other places and said in interviews that Hoch protested the shooting at the time. Some say he protested it officially. A few say that he only said he didn't believe there would be enough light for a good transfer. Guess we will never know for sure what was really said, but knowing how Dobie confused a few things in interviews and commentaries, (he was in his seventies when the book was written, I think), it was probably something in between what has been written everywhere. In the book it says Ford asked Hoch what he thought. Hoch said, "It's awfully dark, Jack, but I'll shoot it. I just can't promise anything." I suppose it is possible that he wrote that up to protect himself in case the shoot did not turn out well. But, who really cares? I mean, he did shoot it, it didn't turn out well, it was excellent, and it was a big part of his winning the academy award...or most folks seem to think....I am one of them. And for that one scene, I am most thankful that Pappy Ford was the visionary he was. His expert cameraman didn't think the shot would work, but Pappy did.......and boy was he ever right, as usual. One of his most masterful scenes. Oh, must have missed the part where Dobe said that Ford just made that up. Couldn't find it in the book. KEITH
      God, she reminds me of me! DUKE

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