Sergeant York (1941)

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    There are 21 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by The Ringo Kid.

    • Sergeant York (1941)

      SERGEANT YORK

      DIRECTED AND PRODUCED BY HOWARD HAWKS
      WARNER BROTHERS



      Information From IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Alvin York (Gary Cooper), a poor Tennessee hillbilly,
      is an exceptional marksman, but a ne'er-do-well prone
      to drinking and fighting, which doesn't make things
      any easier for his patient mother (Margaret Wycherly).
      He undergoes a religious awakening and turns his life around,
      assisted by Pastor Rosier Pile (Walter Brennan).
      When York is drafted into the army for World War I,
      he tries to get out as a conscientious objector
      due to his religious beliefs, but a sympathetic commanding officer
      persuades him to stay.
      York decides to leave it in God's hands, but still doubts
      he can kill someone who has not done him any harm.
      During basic training, his superiors find out that
      he is a phenomenal marksman and promote him to corporal.
      His unit is shipped out to Europe and participates in an attack.
      Pinned down by German fire and seeing his friends being shot down
      all around him, his self-doubt disappears.
      Owing to the large number of casualties,
      York suddenly finds himself placed in charge.
      He works his way around behind German lines and shoots
      with such deadly effect that the Germans surrender.
      Then, York forces a captured German officer (Charles Esmond)
      at gunpoint to order the Germans still fighting to surrender.
      He and the handful of other survivors end up with 132 prisoners.
      York becomes a national hero and is awarded the Medal of Honor.
      York later explains that he did what he did to hasten
      the end of the war and minimize the killing.
      edited by ethanedwards

      Cast
      Gary Cooper ... Alvin Cullum York
      Walter Brennan ... Pastor Rosier Pile
      Joan Leslie ... Gracie Williams
      George Tobias ... 'Pusher' Ross
      Stanley Ridges ... Maj. Buxton
      Margaret Wycherly ... Mother York
      Ward Bond ... Ike Botkin
      Noah Beery Jr. ... Buck Lipscomb
      June Lockhart ... Rosie York
      Dickie Moore ... George York
      Clem Bevans ... Zeke
      Howard Da Silva ... Lem
      Charles Trowbridge ... Cordell Hull
      Harvey Stephens ... Capt. Danforth
      David Bruce ... Bert Thomas
      Carl Esmond ... German major (as Charles Esmond)
      Joe Sawyer ... Sgt. Early (as Joseph Sawyer)
      Pat Flaherty ... Sgt. Harry Parsons
      Robert Porterfield ... Zeb Andrews
      Erville Alderson ... Nate Tomkins
      and many more...

      Writing credits
      Alvin C. York (diary) (as Sergeant York)
      Tom Skeyhill (diary editor)
      Abem Finkel (screenplay) &
      Harry Chandlee (screenplay) and
      Howard Koch (screenplay) &
      John Huston (screenplay)
      Sam Cowan

      Produced by
      Howard Hawks .... producer
      Jesse L. Lasky .... producer
      Hal B. Wallis .... producer

      Original Music
      Max Steiner

      Cinematography
      Sol Polito

      Film Editing
      William Holmes

      Trivia
      * The actual firearm used by York to dispose of a line of seven Germans was not a Luger as depicted in the film, but rather a 1911 .45 ACP automatic. The Luger was preferred for the filmmaking, however, purely on the basis that they couldn't get the .45 to fire blanks.

      * Alvin C. York allowed the making of a movie based on his life only under the condition that Gary Cooper should play him.

      * Alvin C. York had been approached by producer Jesse Lasky several times, beginning in 1919, to allow a movie to be made of his life, but had refused, believing that "This uniform ain't for sale." Lasky convinced York that, with war threatening in Europe, it was his patriotic duty to allow the film to proceed. York finally agreed - but only on three conditions. First, York's share of the profits would be contributed to a Bible School York wanted constructed. Second, no cigarette smoking actress could be chosen to play his wife. Third, that only Gary Cooper, could recreate his life on screen. Cooper at first turned down the role, but when York himself contacted the star with a personal plea, Cooper agreed to do the picture.

      * Joan Leslie was sixteen when she filmed "Sergeant York," the same age as the real Gracie. York had made it clear he didn't want any actress with any sort of notoriety connected with her portraying his wife. He specifically said, "No Ooomph Girls!" a clear reference to Warner contract player Ann Sheridan. Incredibly Jane Russell was considered before the wholesome Leslie was ultimately chosen.

      * Warner Brothers sought and obtained releases from other surviving members of York's platoon.

      * Alvin York thought he should be portrayed on the screen by Gary Cooper. When Samuel Goldwyn resisted releasing him, Henry Fonda, James Stewart, and even Ronald Reagen were considered. Goldwyn finally gave in when Warners agreed to lend Bette Davis to the independent producer for "The Little Foxes."

      * Principle photography occurred between February and late April 1941, and the film was criticized by pacifists for its pro-war stance.

      * The scene where Alvin's becomes converted with the bolt of lightning was an invention of the screenwriters. In reality his conversion by his future wife from a hard-drinking roustabout to Sunday school teacher was slower and less dramatic.

      * The film's working title was The Amazing Life of Sergeant York.

      * William Keighley was scheduled to direct, but when the starting date was postponed, he went on to another film.

      * The producer, Jesse Lasky suggested Jane Russell for the part of "Gracie" and Helen Wood, Linda Hayes and Susan Peters tested for the role; Mary Nash tested for "Mother York," and Pat O'Brien and Ronald Reagan were tested for the role of "Sergeant York." Charles Root was also considered for a role in the film.

      * According to the daily production reports included in the film's file at USC, Vincent Sherman directed some scenes while Howard Hawks went to a racetrack.

      * Because of the 1941 draft, the filmmakers had difficulty finding enough young male actors to play the soldiers and were forced to hire students from local universities.

      * A press release dated July 2, 1941 states that Sergeant York (1941) was the first motion picture to be made into a stage play. The film was transcribed by Robert Porterfield, who made his debut in this film.

      * Gary Cooper, unable to participate in WWII due to his age and an old injury to his hip, felt strongly that Sergeant York (1941) was his way of contributing to the cause. Cooper later said "Sergeant York and I had quite a few things in common, even before I played him in screen. We both were raised in the mountains -- Tennessee for him, Montana for me -- and learned to ride and shoot as a natural part of growing up. Sergeant York (1941) won me an Academy Award, but that's not why it's my favorite film. I liked the role because of the background of the picture, and because I was portraying a good, sound American character."

      * Gary Cooper's acceptance speech typified so many of the actor's performances when he said "It was Sergeant Alvin York who won this award; Shucks, I've been in this business sixteen years and sometimes dreamed I might get one of these things. That's all I can say! Funny, when I was dreaming, I always made a good speech." As he left the stage, he forgot the Oscar on the podium.

      Goofs
      * Factual errors: When Seargent York looks at the calendar at the end of September to write down his most recent earnings, it is obvious from the calendar close-up that the addition from Sept. 22nd to Sept. 23rd is incorrect. The addition of $41.35 plus $2.55 should yield $43.90, however, the incorrect total of $43.80 is recorded on the calendar as the total for Sept. 23rd.

      * Crew or equipment visible: A guide wire is visible that is connected to a tree stump in the scene where the stump is being removed by a horse. The guide wire is visible behind the stump as the stump pulls free from the ground.

      * Factual errors: In the movie Sergeant York is presented the French 'Medaille militaire' by Marechal Foch and is shown already wearing the 'Croix de Guerre', however York was not awarded the 'Medaille militaire' by France. He did receive, though, the 'Legion d'honneur' and the 'Croix de Guerre'.

      * Revealing mistakes: At 6.10am York and company leave the trenches to attack the German positions. Their shadows however indicate the sun is directly overhead.

      * Factual errors: Alvin York actually carried the British Enfield rifle into battle instead of the US 1903 Springfield as shown.

      * Factual errors: Sgt. York is shown with his pistol shooting a line of German soldiers coming at him from front to back. In reality he shot them in a line from back to front as he quoted himself, "just like a flock of turkeys".

      Filming Locations
      Burro Flats, Simi Hills, California, USA
      Warner Bros. Studios, Warner Brothers Burbank Studios - 4000 Warner Boulevard, Burbank, California, USA
      (studio)
      Warner Ranch, Calabasas, California, USA
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 8 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: Classic War Movies- Sergeant York (1941)

      Sergeant York is a 1941 biographical film about the life of Alvin York,
      one of the most-decorated American soldiers of World War I. #
      It was directed by Howard Hawks and was the highest-grossing film of the year.

      The film was based on the diary of Sergeant Alvin York, as edited by Tom Skeyhill
      and adapted by Harry Chandlee, Abem Finkel, John Huston, Howard Koch,
      and Sam Cowan (uncredited).

      York refused, several times, to authorize a film version of his life story,
      but finally yielded to persistent efforts in order to finance the creation
      of an interdenominational Bible school.
      The story that York insisted on Gary Cooper for the title role derives from the fact
      that producer Jesse L. Lasky recruited Cooper by writing a plea that he accept the role and then signed York's name to the telegram.

      Cooper went on to win the Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal.
      The film also won for Best Film Editing and was nominated in nine other categories,
      including Best Picture, Director (Hawks), Supporting Actor (Walter Brennan),
      and Supporting Actress (Margaret Wycherly).

      The American Film Institute ranked the film 57th in the its 100 most inspirational American movies
      . It also rated Alvin York 35th in its list of the top 50 heroes in American cinema.

      In 2008, Sergeant York was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry
      by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

      Directed by Howard Hawks, Sergeant York is a true story,
      about the life of Alvin York,
      the most-decorated American soldier of World War I.
      The story was written from York's actual diaries.
      The real York, objected to the movie being made,
      until WW11 broke then, and only then, relented on condition
      that Gary Cooper played him.

      I thought this a great film to watch,
      with a compelling story.
      Cooper was absolutely perfect in his role as York,
      convincing and credible,his portrayal won him
      an Academy Award, for best actor

      The film also won for Best Film Editing
      and was nominated in nine other categories,
      including Best Picture,Supporting Actor, Walter Brennan
      and Supporting Actress, Margaret Wycherly
      The American Film Institute ranked the film 57th.
      in the its 100 most inspirational American movies
      It also rated Alvin York 35th in its
      list of the top 50 heroes in American cinema.
      It was the highest-grossing film of the year.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: Classic War Movies- Sergeant York (1941)

      This is one heck of a great film and one of my all-time most favorites. Together with an excellent cast and all, the story never slows down. I like this movie more and more everytime I get to see it.
      Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..
    • Re: Classic War Movies- Sergeant York (1941)

      Loved this movie, this would also have to be my fav coop movie, although high noon would be a very close second. This is a very inspirational story about a real hero in war. As was to hell and back? i believe that was the audie murphy one.

      -IHW
    • Re: Classic War Movies- Sergeant York (1941)

      I don't know if I could ever pick a favorite Gary Cooper movie-he had so many great ones. However, it's a toss-up between this movie and Beau Geste-for my favorite and Ball of Fire comes in close behind.
      Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..
    • Re: Last Non Western You Watched

      The Ringo Kid wrote:

      Sergeant York w/ Gary Cooper, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond, Noah Beery Jr and others.


      What the Sarge eventually received:


      The Springfield .03 that the Sarge used in the movie:




      A nice shot of the Sarge as a Corporal:


      The "Sarge" and "General John "Blackjack" Pershing"


      About to go "Over-the-top"




      "OVER THE TOP"


      This here rifle-gun shoots a might low:


      Great shot of Sarge:


      Great shot of the Sarge and some of his men:


      This here pistol-gun touches off mighty easy:


      Booodoodoodoodle: About to bag his passel of German "Turkeys"


      Sarge sneaking up on them Heinie's:


      The movie and the real Sarges:






      Sarge side-by-side with "Himself"


      Sarge receiving the Medal of Honor from General John "Blackjack" Pershing:


      Nice combat scene:


      "Psssssshaw, I Cant hold my breath no longer" (Pusher)


      "Turkey" shooting:


      Of a perfect movie!!!
      Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..
    • The Ringo Kid wrote:

      What the Sarge eventually received:




      A nice shot of the Sarge:


      The "Sarge" and "General John "Blackjack" Pershing"


      About to go "Over-the-top"




      "OVER THE TOP"


      This here rifle-gun shoots a might low:


      Great shot of Sarge:


      This here pistol-gun touches off mighty easy:


      Booodoodoodoodle: About to bag his passel of German "Turkeys"


      The movie and the real Sarges:






      Sarge receiving the Medal of Honor from General John "Blackjack" Pershing:


      Nice combat scene:


      "Psssssshaw, I Cant hold my breath no longer" (Pusher)


      "Turkey" shooting:


      Of a perfect movie!!!


      Another one to add to my list of Gary Cooper films to watch.
      Got round to High Noon yesterday on blu ray, def worth the upgrade from DVD.