Broken Arrow (1950)

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    There are 7 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by Little One.

    • Broken Arrow (1950)

      BROKEN ARROW

      DIRECTED BY DELMER DAVIES
      PRODUCED BY JULIAN BLAUSTEIN
      TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX


      Photo with the courtesy of lasbugas

      Information From IMDb

      Plot Summary
      By 1870, there has been 10 years of cruel war between settlers and Cochise's Apaches. Ex-soldier Tom Jeffords saves the life of an Apache boy and starts to wonder if Indians are human, after all; soon, he determines to use this chance to make himself an ambassador. Against all odds, his solitary mission into Cochise's stronghold opens a dialogue. Opportunely, the president sends General Howard with orders to conclude peace. But even with Jeffords' luck, the deep grievance and hatred on both sides make tragic failure all too likely
      Written by Rod Crawford

      Full Cast
      James Stewart ... Tom Jeffords
      Jeff Chandler ... Cochise
      Debra Paget ... Sonseeahray ('Morningstar')
      Basil Ruysdael ... Gen. Oliver 'The Christian General' Howard
      Will Geer ... Ben Slade, Rancher
      Joyce Mackenzie ... Terry, Scatfly Proprietress (as Joyce MacKenzie)
      Arthur Hunnicutt ... Milt Duffield, Mail Superintendent
      Robert Adler ... Lonergan, Stage Driver (uncredited)
      Trevor Bardette ... Stage Passenger (uncredited)
      Chris Willow Bird ... Nochalo, Wedding Officiant (uncredited)
      Raymond Bramley ... Col. Bernall (uncredited)
      Argentina Brunetti ... Nalikadeya, Cochise's Wife (uncredited)
      Harry Carter ... Miner (uncredited)
      Iron Eyes Cody ... Teese, Court Jester (uncredited)
      J.W. Cody ... Pionsenay, Chosen Warrior (uncredited)
      Heinie Conklin ... Townsman (uncredited)
      Dolores Christine Cypert ... American Indian / Redbird (uncredited)
      Aubrey Lee Dale ... Indian (uncredited)
      John Doucette ... Mule Driver (uncredited)
      Robert Foster Dover ... Machogee, Boy Healed by Jeffords (uncredited)
      Nacho Galindo ... Barber (uncredited)
      Robert Griffin ... John Lowrie (uncredited)
      Bob Kortman ... Minor Role (uncredited)
      Mickey Kuhn ... Bob Slade (uncredited)
      Jack Lee ... Boucher (uncredited)
      John Marston ... Maury, Stage Passenger (uncredited)
      Frank McGrath ... Barfly (uncredited)
      Edwin Rand ... Sergeant (uncredited)
      Jay Silverheels ... Geronimo (uncredited)
      Charles Soldani ... Skinyea, Chosen Warrior (uncredited)
      Richard Van Opel ... Bernall's Adjutant (uncredited)
      John War Eagle ... Nahilzay, Rejected Suitor (uncredited)
      Billy Wilkerson ... Juan, Teacher-Guide (uncredited)
      Bud Wolfe ... Man Saying '...or a Blasted Liar' (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      Elliott Arnold (novel "Blood Brother")
      Albert Maltz (screenplay) (front Michael Blankfort)
      Michael Blankfort (front for Albert Maltz)

      Produced
      Julian Blaustein

      Original Music
      Hugo Friedhofer

      Cinematography
      Ernest Palmer

      Trivia
      At 41, James Stewart was 25 years older than Debra Paget, who was barely 16 at the time of filming.

      Filmed in 1949 but released after Stewart's next western, Winchester '73 (1950).

      Screenwriter Albert Maltz did not receive a credit when the film was released because he was blacklisted. Instead, the script was credited to Michael Blankfort.

      The film was considered groundbreaking at the time because it portrayed the Native American Indians in a humane light, something that had scarcely happened since silent days. However, years later the film was heavily criticized because the Indians were still played by white actors.

      "Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on January 22, 1951 with Debra Paget reprising her film role.

      "Screen Director's Playhouse" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on September 7, 1951 with James Stewart and Jeff Chandler reprising their film roles.

      The movie's world premiere was held in the Nusho Theater in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma.

      The broken arrow, which signals an end to fighting, is in fact a Blackfoot Indian symbol, not an Apache symbol. The Blackfoot are native to Montana and Alberta, Canada.

      Goofs
      * Continuity: When General Oliver is beginning to pick himself off the ground after the Apache attack on the military wagon train, the first shot shows the ground to be mostly desert sand, with very little vegetation. But when the scene jumps to a long shot of the General getting up the ground around him is almost entirely covered with green vegetation, showing scarcely any sand at all.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, California, USA
      Cathedral Rock, Sedona, Arizona, USA
      Coconino Mountains, Arizona, USA
      Flagstaff, Arizona, USA
      Iverson Ranch, Chatsworth, Los Angeles, California, USA
      Oak Creek Canyon, Sedona, Arizona, USA
      Old Tucson - 201 S. Kinney Road, Tucson, Arizona, USA
      (and vicinity)
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 3 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: Classic Movie Westerns- Broken Arrow (1950)

      Broken Arrow is a western Technicolor film released in 1950.
      It was directed by Delmer Daves and starred James Stewart
      as Tom Jeffords and Jeff Chandler as Cochise.

      The film is based on these historical figures but fictionalizes
      their story in dramatized form.
      It was nominated for three Academy Awards, and won a Golden Globe award
      for Best Film Promoting International Understanding.
      Film historians have said that the movie was one of the first major Westerns
      since the Second World War to portray the Indians sympathetically.

      [IMG:http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/3fa2c3d6.jpg]

      Moving movie and made just after Winchester '73.
      Although the age gap between Stewart and Paget in these days
      would be considered absurd, it was a lovely film, but still with plenty of action!

      Although at the time it was groundbreaking in portraying the native Indians in a humane light,
      it was later criticized for hypocritically having the natives played by white actors!

      However a great Film, with Stewart, Paget and Chandler credible in their parts.
      Look out for Jay Silverheels(Tonto) as Geronimo.

      Filmed in many of our favourite and well known movie locations.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 4 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: Classic Movie Westerns- Broken Arrow (1950)

      chester7777 wrote:

      Thanks, Keith for reminding us this Jimmy Stewart movie. Don't have this one in our collection, but plan on getting it.

      It is avaliable from Amazon.com, Here, for around $12.00.

      Chester :newyear:


      Hi Chester,
      I bought the US release a month ago and the DVD is a good transfer!
      Highly recommend it.
      "Pour yourself some backbone and shut up!"
    • Re: Classic Movie Westerns- Broken Arrow (1950)

      Broken Arrow was a good movie. Kinda corny, uh? But it was such a film that showed more of the diverse side of Stewart and how he could really handle a part when he made films. it wasn't his best but it was one that made westerns more two sided than it was before. When I say before, I am talking about having the good guys versus the bad guys mentality. This gave the indians a way that they were a people who wanted to protect what was theirs, and not let someone push them around.

      I like this movie because it showed Stewart in a role that he was going to bring peace when it seemed no one wanted it and it was against all odds. He was powerful in this.

      Cheers :cool: Hondo
      [IMG:http://www.jwaynefan.com/images/gallery/libvalance.jpg]

      "When you come slam bang up against trouble, it never looks half as bad if you face up to it"
      - John Wayne quote
    • Re: Classic Movie Westerns- Broken Arrow (1950)

      Hondo Duke Lane wrote:

      Broken Arrow was a good movie. Kinda corny, uh? But it was such a film that showed more of the diverse side of Stewart and how he could really handle a part when he made films. it wasn't his best but it was one that made westerns more two sided than it was before. When I say before, I am talking about having the good guys versus the bad guys mentality. This gave the indians a way that they were a people who wanted to protect what was theirs, and not let someone push them around.

      I like this movie because it showed Stewart in a role that he was going to bring peace when it seemed no one wanted it and it was against all odds. He was powerful in this.

      Cheers :cool: Hondo


      Couldn't agree more.
      Jimmy Stewart in the Anthony Mann Westerns, in particular the man from Laramie, is fantastic. Amazing it took till later in his career to show such a different side and to be convincing as a character so different to what we were used to.
      "Pour yourself some backbone and shut up!"
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