Up the River (1930)

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    There are 41 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by arthurarnell.

    • Up the River (1930)

      UP THE RIVER

      DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD
      PRODUCED BY WILLIAM FOX
      FOX FILM CORPORATION



      Information from IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Two prisoners, Saint Louis and Dannemora Dan, escape during a theatrical production in order to go to the aid of Steve, a former prisoner whose past is about to be exposed by the man who framed Judy unless Steve agrees to help him commit another crime.
      Written by Ed Stephan

      Full Cast
      Spencer Tracy ... Saint Louis
      Claire Luce ... Judy Fields
      Warren Hymer ... Dannemora Dan
      Humphrey Bogart ... Steve Jordan
      William Collier Sr. ... Pop
      Joan Marie Lawes ... Jean (as Joan Lawes)
      Ward Bond ... Inmate Socked by Saint Louis (uncredited)
      Joe Brown ... Deputy Warden (uncredited)
      Bob Burns ... Slim - Bazooka Player (uncredited)
      Eddy Chandler ... Guard (uncredited)
      Edythe Chapman ... Mrs. Jordan (uncredited)
      Harvey Clark ... Nash (uncredited)
      Dick Curtis ... New Inmate (uncredited)
      Mike Donlin ... Upstate Baseball Manager (uncredited)
      Noel Francis ... Sophie (uncredited)
      Althea Henley ... Cynthia Jordan (uncredited)
      Elizabeth Keating ... May (uncredited)
      Helen Keating ... June (uncredited)
      Richard Keene ... Dick (uncredited)
      Sharon Lynn ... Edith La Verne (uncredited)
      George MacFarlane ... Whiteley (uncredited)
      Wilbur Mack ... Honest John Jessup (uncredited)
      Louise Mackintosh ... Mrs. Massey (uncredited)
      Goodee Montgomery ... Kit (uncredited)
      Robert Emmett O'Connor ... Prison Warden (uncredited)
      Robert Parrish ... Boy (uncredited)
      Claude Payton ... Guard (uncredited)
      Steve Pendleton ... Morris (uncredited)
      Pat Somerset ... Beauchamp (uncredited)
      John Swor ... Clem (uncredited)
      Mildred Vincent ... Annie (uncredited)
      Johnnie Walker ... Happy (uncredited)
      Morgan Wallace ... Frosby (uncredited)
      Adele Windsor ... Minnie (uncredited)
      Carol Wines ... Daisy Elmore (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      Maurine Dallas Watkins (story)
      William Collier Sr. uncredited
      John Ford uncredited

      Original Music
      James F. Hanley
      Joseph McCarthy

      Cinematography
      Joseph H. August

      Trivia
      This is the only movie in which Humphrey Bogart and Spencer Tracy co-star. Although Tracy and Bogart were good friends, they never appeared in another movie together, as Bogart was tied to a contract with Warner Bros. for much of his career while Tracy was bound first to Fox, and then (most famously) to MGM. When the freelance era rolled around in the 1950s and both were free of their studio contracts, the two talked about co-starring together in a picture, but according to Tracy's lover Katharine Hepburn, they could never agree on who would get top billing (although Tracy was the more respected thespian, Bogart was more popular at the box office; however, after playing second-fiddle to Clark Gable for many years at MGM, Tracy wasn't about to accept second billing at that time in his career). Hepburn recalled they considered a suggested compromise that would have created an "X"-shaped credit in which Humphrey Tracy would have co-starred with Spencer Bogart, when read normally.

      The first of Humphrey Bogart's feature-length films to be released, on October 12, 1930. His second, "A Devil with Women", was released six days later, on October 18.

      This is the first John Ford film in which Spencer Tracy appeared: their second collaboration took place three decades later, when Tracy starred in Ford's The Last Hurrah. It is strange to realize that these two great Irish American icons only collaborated two times (Tracy narrated How the West Was Won, one of the sequences of which was shot by Ford, but that doesn't count as a true collaboration), but for most of their careers, they were bound to different studios, Ford to 20th Century-Fox and Tracy to M.G.M. By the time the freelance era rolled around in the late 1950s, Tracy was appearing in very few movies.

      Spencer Tracy received a 2-week leave of absence from a hit Broadway show in order to appear in this film. This required the film to be shot under a very tight production schedule.

      Broadway producer Herman Shumlin granted Spencer Tracy two weeks leave from his hit drama "The Last Mile" after the actor appealed to him for the opportunity to work for John Ford in this picture.

      Memorable Quotes

      Watch this clip

      [extendedmedia]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_C7sFciUZGI[/extendedmedia]
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 3 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: John Ford- Up the River (1930)

      Up the River is a Pre-Code comedy film about escaped convicts,
      and featuring Spencer Tracy and Humphrey Bogart
      in their feature film debuts.

      Take a look at the attachments below, and see
      if you think it is a young Duke,
      as if we are sure, we can once again re-write the Filmography



      From
      Prison Movies
      Prison stuff. In prison movies.
      Up the River is a low-key comedy drama starring Humphrey Bogart and Spencer Tracy very early in their careers. An early talkie directed by John Ford, it was apparently going to be a drama until The Big House (1930) beat it to the punch.. so it was rewritten as a comedy.

      Bogart plays young Steve Jordan, a trusty in a mid-Western prison who comes from a well-heeled New England family. His family believe he’s in China. Tracy (in his first Hollywood film) plays a feted baseballer (Saint Louis) who is brought back to the same prison after having escaped from another prison with his simple sidekick, Dannemora Dan (Warren Hymer). Steve falls in love at first sight with a newly received prisoner in the women’s section, Judy Fields (Claire Luce), who has landed in prison after taking the rap for Frosby (Morgan Wallace), a much-older swindler with whom she was teamed. Steve and Judy get engaged after two brief meetings; the Warden kindly allows them a third on the day he is paroled.

      Steve returns home. Frosby tracks him down, sets up his scam in the same town and threatens to expose Steve to his mother if he blows the whistle. Judy asks Saint Louis for help… not such a difficult task as conveniently the men’s and women’s exercise yards are separated only by bars. Saint and Dan escape again, this time during a concert in the prison, and head straight to New England where they manage to sort things out with the blackmailing Frosby… and then surrender themselves back into prison just in time for Saint to take his place in a much-awaited baseball match against a rival prison.

      It does have a number of features that distinguish it from most other prison movies. For starters, it is an extraordinarily benign, almost-utopian prison. Then there’s the warden’s 8-year-old daughter Jean, for example, (in real life the daughter of Lewis Lawes, the Warden of Sing Sing), who plays unsupervised out in the yard with all the male inmates, doing cartwheels and showing off her bloomers. There’s the prison’s baseball mascot, a zebra - the only zebra ever to have a role in a prison movie, as far as I’m aware. A big brass band. And a foolish, upper-class welfare worker, at whom much fun is poked as she dispenses apples, magazines and judgmental opinions to the prisoners, and is the unwitting means through which kites are trafficked from the women’s section to the men’s.

      It’s not a standout prison film by any means, but it stands out as being quite different to other films of it era.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: John Ford- Up the River (1930)

      Previous posts from the thread

      MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      Elly wrote:

      Hi All

      Before I tell you which film this screen capture is from I thought I would get your opinion on whether this is JW please? All I will say is this film was released 1930 thanks

      maybe.jpg


      chester7777 wrote:

      I would say that that could easily be him, and that might even be Yakima Canutt standing behind him.

      Chester :newyear:

      chester7777 wrote:

      The Mrs. and I were looking at John Ford movies for 1930, and thought the movie might be, "Up the River", as several pictures we saw had the same type of stone work as your picture, plus everyone was wearing the same kind of cloths.

      Chester :newyear: and the Mrs. :angel1:

      dukefan1 wrote:

      The one thing that jumped out at me, Elly, is the way the man is standing. That is the classic John Wayne stance! Just might be him.

      Mark

      Elly wrote:

      Hi Keith

      I think with these really early ones where we are 95% sure we should keep them on a separate list until we can prove it 100%.

      I do like the idea of you profiling them as well, perhaps then others might get interested enough to view it and add thier opinion.

      AND it is a good film from FORD.

      I am keeping a list going and for completeness I am also marking it with films I have viewed but did not even spot JW.

      I will send you a copy of it after I have viewed a few more films then update it on a regular basis.

      the problems I am always going to have of course, is getting good quality prints if I can even get a print in the first place.

      and following on from Chesters picture he posted here is another taken around the time of Up the river.


      dukewayne.com/index.php?attach…c967bb320c35c51eb553bd0d5

      ethanedwards wrote:

      We can almost be once again updating
      Duke's Filmography, and more opinions on this?
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      I just had this from Neil (RoughRider)

      Here are quotes from a Peter Bogdanovich interview with John Wayne that shows he was actually on the set of Up the River. This adds credence to the still of what could be Wayne in the background:



      A funny thing happened with Ford after The Big Trail. He was a strange character, you know. After I did that picture, I came back, and he was making Up the River. I went over and said, “Hi, coach.” Nothing. I thought he didn’t hear me. So I figured, Oh, well, he didn’t even see me. The next time I saw him I went, “Hi, coach, hi.” And again I didn’t get anything. So the next time I just went right up in front of him and went, “Hi, coach.” And he turned and talked to somebody else. I thought, That’s that — he won’t speak to me. I don’t know how the hell I can communicate.


      About two years later, I was in Catalina with Ward, having a belt, and Barbara [Ford], his daughter — she was a little girl then — she ran in and said, ‘Daddy wants to see you.” I said, “Whoa, wait a minute, Barbara, you got the wrong boy — must be Ward.” She said, “No, it’s you, Duke.” So I said, “Yeah, honey, run along, you know this is a bar.” So his wife, Mary Ford, came to the door and she said, “Duke, come here. Jack is expecting you out there.” I said, “All right.” So I went out to the Araner, his boat, and I go aboard — I remember Jim Tully was there and four or five guys — and Jack was in the middle of a goddamn story, and he looked up at me and said, “Hi, Duke, sit down.” And to this goddamn day I don’t know why he didn’t speak to me for two years.


      I found this while visiting this website: <http://www.sheilaomalley.com/?p=38180>
      Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      Wow! GREAT detective work, Elly!

      John Ford may have been a brilliant director, but he was also really a jerk, and this is just one more story to further cement my opinion in that regard. Yet in spite of it, he somehow developed a great loyalty among people as well. Personally, I am hard pressed to understand why that is.

      Mrs. C :angel1:
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      Hi Sue

      thank you HOWEVER,

      ALL CREDIT for this must go to NEIL (RoughRider) in this case I was just the messenger.

      People never cease to amaze me in thier behaviour towards others. Thank the Lord I am blessed with lots of gracious and respectful people in my life and work.
      Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      With this little revelation that John Wayne was on the set of Up The River, combined with the screen shot that Elly found from that film of what definitely looks like John Wayne, I think this is another piece of important evidence that shows that he just might of had a bit part in Up The River. I am about 85% sure that he was.
      "I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them" It may be time worn, but it's the best life-creed I know.
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      ethanedwards wrote:

      Shall we therefore list is as an official visible in our Filmography?
      Your Yes or No's please!


      Hello Keith

      I would say No until I have seen a better copy of this film which I have on order so may say YES in 10 days or so!!

      is that enough yes and nos for you LOL

      I spotted an uncredited Ward Bond when I watched this last time but did not note the time or take any screen shots. If you want me to let me know.
      Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      Colorado Bob wrote:

      With this little revelation that John Wayne was on the set of Up The River, combined with the screen shot that Elly found from that film of what definitely looks like John Wayne, I think this is another piece of important evidence that shows that he just might of had a bit part in Up The River. I am about 85% sure that he was.


      Another revelation of this, is that, it can now be said that Duke was in a film with Humphrey Bogart, and Spencer Tracy.

      Chester :newyear:
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      Hi

      I am currently reading Print The Legend - The Life and Times of John Ford by Scott Eyman.

      When discussing 'Up the River' Eyman says that Ford brought Spencer Tracy from New York to star in the film and treated him like royalty.

      Eyman also quotes that during the making of the film

      'During production, John Wayne came back on the lot from long weeks spent filming The Big Trail. The starring part in a Western epic was a big break for a twenty-three year old kid, but Ford wasn't happy for him. As a matter of fact, when Wayne went over to say hello, Ford cut him dead. Then he did it again. A confused Wayne retreated.'

      In view of the above I think I am on solid ground by saying that there is no way that Wayne appeared as an extra in Up The River

      Regards

      Arthur
      Walk Tall - Talk Low
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      arthurarnell wrote:



      [/I]In view of the above I think I am on solid ground by saying that there is no way that Wayne appeared as an extra in Up The River

      Regards

      Arthur


      Having said that Arthur,
      how is it then Duke appeared in

      Born Reckless(1930)
      Men Without Women (1930)

      Unless they were made before The Big Trail!
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      arthurarnell wrote:

      Hi

      I am currently reading Print The Legend - The Life and Times of John Ford by Scott Eyman.

      Eyman also quotes that during the making of the film

      'During production, John Wayne came back on the lot from long weeks spent filming The Big Trail. The starring part in a Western epic was a big break for a twenty-three year old kid, but Ford wasn't happy for him. As a matter of fact, when Wayne went over to say hello, Ford cut him dead. Then he did it again. A confused Wayne retreated.'



      Regards

      Arthur


      Well Eyman did not even get JW AGE right "twenty-three year old kid"

      The point I keep making about basic inaccuracies in MOST of the books written about JW

      Elly
      Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind
    • Re: MYSTERY FILM with JW?

      ethanedwards wrote:



      Unless they were made before The Big Trail!


      Hi Keith

      and here in is another dilemma!!

      WE DO NOT KNOW PRODUCTION DATES

      so it is very difficult to assume things from release dates.

      I think the reason the first meeting of JW with Ford is often said to be 1928 is because that is the RELEASE date of Mother Machree.

      HOWEVER, we KNOW that production on this film started September 1926

      Elly
      Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind

    ..