The Whole Town's Talking (1935)

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    There are 2 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by chester7777.

    • The Whole Town's Talking (1935)

      THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING
      aka Passport to Fame


      DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD
      PRODUCED BY JOHN FORD/ LESTER COWAN
      COLUMBIA PICTURES CORPORATION


      [IMG:http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne-%202/84213bf6.jpg]


      Information from IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Ordinary man-in-the-street Arthur Ferguson Jones leads a very straightforward life.
      He's never late for work and nothing interesting ever happens to him.
      One day everything changes: he oversleeps and is fired as an example,
      he's then mistaken for evil criminal killer Mannion and is arrested.
      The resemblance is so striking that the police give him a special pass
      to avoid a similar mistake.
      The real Mannion sees the opportunity to steal the pass
      and move around freely and chaos results.
      Written by Col Needham

      Full Cast
      Edward G. Robinson ... Arthur Ferguson Jones
      Jean Arthur ... Miss Clark
      Arthur Hohl ... Detective Sergeant Boyle
      James Donlan ... Detective Sergeant Howe
      Arthur Byron ... Spencer
      Wallace Ford ... Healy
      Donald Meek ... Hoyt
      Etienne Girardot ... Seaver
      Edward Brophy ... 'Slugs' Martin
      Paul Harvey ... 'J.G.' Carpenter
      Harry Abrahams ... Convict (uncredited)
      Ernie Adams ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Carmen Andre ... Clerk (uncredited)
      Charles A. Bachman ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Eddie Baker ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Lucille Ball ... Bank Employee (uncredited)
      George Barton ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Arthur Belasco ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Brooks Benedict ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Joseph E. Bernard ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Stanley Blystone ... Charlie - Clerk (uncredited)
      Harry Bowen ... Mike O'Connor - Taxi Driver (uncredited)
      Ed Brady ... Trustee (uncredited)
      Lynton Brent ... Warden's Secretary (uncredited)
      Maurice Brierre ... Clerk (uncredited)
      Don Brodie ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Vance Carroll ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Monte Carter ... (uncredited)
      Nancy Caswell ... Clerk (uncredited)
      Allan Cavan ... Conductor (uncredited)
      Eddy Chandler ... Guard / Driver (uncredited)
      Jack Cheatham ... Guard with Warden (uncredited)
      Ivan Christy ... Customer (uncredited)
      Steve Clark ... Convict (uncredited)
      Nick Copeland ... Waiter (uncredited)
      Jules Cowles ... Convict (uncredited)
      Kernan Cripps ... Policeman / Guard (uncredited)
      Floyd Criswell ... Motorcycle Officer (uncredited)
      Charles Cross ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Sidney D'Albrook ... Waiter (uncredited)
      Alice Dahl ... (uncredited)
      Bobbie Dale ... Cameraman (uncredited)
      Edwards Davis ... Captain, S.S. Shanghai (uncredited)
      Lew Davis ... Ship Steward (uncredited)
      Sidney De Gray ... Customer (uncredited)
      Gordon De Main ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
      Rita Donlin ... (uncredited)
      Allyn Drake ... Telephone Operator (uncredited)
      Lowell Drew ... (uncredited)
      Harry Dunkinson ... Customer (uncredited)
      Jay Eaton ... (uncredited)
      Pearl Eaton ... (uncredited)
      Effie Ellsler ... Aunt Agatha (uncredited)
      Eddie Fetherston ... Cameraman (uncredited)
      Budd Fine ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Larry Fisher ... Trustee (uncredited)
      Sam Flint ... City Commissioner (uncredited)
      Bess Flowers ... Miss Gower - Secretary (uncredited)
      Francis Ford ... Newspaper Reporter at Dock (uncredited)
      May Foster ... Fat Woman (uncredited)
      Rosita Foucher ... Telephone Operator (uncredited)
      Christian J. Frank ... (uncredited)
      Desmond Gallagher ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Robert Graves ... (uncredited)
      Maurine Gray ... (uncredited)
      Roger Gray ... Customer (uncredited)
      Jack Grey ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Carlton Griffin ... (uncredited)
      Kit Guard ... Convict (uncredited)
      Sherry Hall ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Eddie Hart ... Gangster (uncredited)
      Pat Hartigan ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Bernadene Hayes ... Waitress (uncredited)
      Grace Hayle ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Edward Hearn ... Policeman Announcing Carpenter (uncredited)
      Oscar 'Dutch' Hendrian ... Gangster (uncredited)
      Charles H. Hickman ... Detective (uncredited)
      Pauline High ... (uncredited)
      Rodney Hildebrand ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Al Hill ... One of Mannion's Henchmen (uncredited)
      Carol Holloway ... Customer (uncredited)
      Robert Homans ... Detective (uncredited)
      Arthur Stuart Hull ... City Official (uncredited)
      John Ince ... (uncredited)
      Mitchell Ingraham ... (uncredited)
      Sunny Ingraham ... Secretary (uncredited)
      John Irwin ... Convict (uncredited)
      Gladden James ... Secretary (uncredited)
      Bud Jamison ... Policeman (uncredited)
      William Jeffrey ... Bank Manager (uncredited)
      Ed Jones ... (uncredited)
      Edward Keane ... U.S. Deputy Attorney (uncredited)
      Cornelius Keefe ... Radio Man (uncredited)
      Charles King ... Cameraman (uncredited)
      Brady Kline ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Ethan Laidlaw ... Police Switchboard Operator (uncredited)
      Jerry Larkin ... Porter (uncredited)
      W.E. Lawrence ... Customer (uncredited)
      Peggy Leon ... (uncredited)
      Tom London ... Guard (uncredited)
      Walter Long ... Convict (uncredited)
      J. Farrell MacDonald ... Prison Warden (uncredited)
      Stanley Mack ... Gangster (uncredited)
      Frank Marlowe ... Ship Steward (uncredited)
      Charles Marsh ... (uncredited)
      Charles McAvoy ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Charles McMurphy ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Philip Morris ... Detective (uncredited)
      Harry Mount ... Newsboy (uncredited)
      Jack Mower ... Guard (uncredited)
      Ferdinand Munier ... Mayor (uncredited)
      Irving Newhoff ... Henchman (uncredited)
      Ned Norton ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Frank O'Connor ... Detective Removing Handcuffs (uncredited)
      Robert Emmett O'Connor ... Police Lt. Mack (uncredited)
      Pat O'Malley ... Detective (uncredited)
      Ted Oliver ... Motorcycle Officer (uncredited)
      Robert Parrish ... Bit Part (uncredited)
      Steve Pendleton ... Convict (uncredited)
      Jimmy Phillips ... Pickpocket (uncredited)
      Virginia Pine ... Seaver's Secretary (uncredited)
      Richard Powell ... Police Lieutenant in Bank (uncredited)
      Hal Price ... Fingerprint Expert (uncredited)
      James Quinn ... Pickpocket (uncredited)
      Arthur Rankin ... Clerk (uncredited)
      Ralph Remley ... Sam Dixon - Office Ribber (uncredited)
      Jack Richardson ... Detective (uncredited)
      Don Roberts ... (uncredited)
      Ky Robinson ... Detective (uncredited)
      Oscar Rudolph ... Office Clerk Bringing Telegram (uncredited)
      Dick Rush ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Jack Santoro ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Joe Sawyer ... Nick - Mannion's Henchman (uncredited)
      Allan Sears ... Policeman (uncredited)
      Harry Semels ... Italian Visitor (uncredited)
      Marion Sheldon ... (uncredited)
      Frank Sheridan ... Russell - Prison Official (uncredited)
      Charles Sherlock ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Lee Shumway ... Police Sergeant (uncredited)
      Reginald Simpson ... (uncredited)
      Phillips Smalley ... City Official (uncredited)
      Robert Stanley ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Larry Steers ... (uncredited)
      Charles Sullivan ... Henchman (uncredited)
      Ben Taggart ... Traffic Officer (uncredited)
      Harry Tenbrook ... Mannion's Henchman on Lookout (uncredited)
      Arthur Thalasso ... Gatekeeper (uncredited)
      William L. Thorne ... Policeman (uncredited)
      John Tyke ... Convict (uncredited)
      Emmett Vogan ... Reporter (uncredited)
      Blue Washington ... Bank Doorman (uncredited)
      Billy West ... Elevator Man (uncredited)
      Lloyd Whitlock ... (uncredited)
      Robert Wilber ... Henchman (uncredited)
      Corinne Williams ... (uncredited)
      Maston Williams ... Convict (uncredited)
      William A. Williams ... (uncredited)
      Clarence Wilson ... Head of Chamber of Commerce (uncredited)
      Harry Wilson ... Convict (uncredited)
      John Wray ... Henchman Harry (uncredited)
      Ernest F. Young ... (uncredited)

      Writing Credits
      Jo Swerling (screen play) and
      Robert Riskin (screen play)
      W.R. Burnett (story "Jail Breaker")

      Cinematography
      Joseph H. August

      Trivia
      This movie is the inspiration for 1998 Bollywood movie 'Duplicate'
      starring Shahrukh Khan in the double role.

      The Whole Town's Talking – which had the working titles
      of "Jail Breaker" and "Passport to Fame".[3] – was in production from
      October 24 to December 11, 1934
      The film incorporated some footage originally shot for Columbia's 1931 film The Criminal Code.

      Columbia Pictures borrowed Edward G. Robinson for this film from Warner Bros.
      – Robinson heard about the transactions through gossip columnist Louella Parsons.
      At the time Robinson's career was somewhat moribund and the star was tired of playing only
      gangsters.
      He was initially opposed to the project but became convinced after reading the script.
      In retrospect The Whole Town's Talking has been seen as a turning point for Robinson,
      reviving his cinematic fortunes.
      Along with 1938's A Slight Case of Murder, it was one of the few comedies Robinson made.

      W.R. Burnett, who wrote the story that The Whole Town's Talking was based on,
      also wrote Little Caesar, which was the film that catapulted Robinson to stardom,
      and High Sierra, the film of which was a significant step for Humphrey Bogart
      in moving from playing gangsters to romantic lead.
      [edit]Response

      Film critic and historian Jean Mitry said of the film that it is "...wonderfully cut and mounted,
      supercharged, taut like a spring, it is a work of total perfection in its genre"
      and Michael Costello of All Movie Guide wrote that
      "Ford directs and cuts the scenes with uncharacteristic rapidity,
      seeming to enjoy playing off the meek clerk against the anarchic gangster."

      Goofs
      Continuity
      When Jonesy leaves his apartment in a rush he forgets to turn off the taps and his tub is (torrentially) overflowing. But when he returns from the police much later in the day there is no water anywhere.

      Memorable Quotes

      Watch a Clip
      The Whole Town's Talking
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: John Ford- The Whole Town's Talking (1935)

      The Whole Town's Talking (released in the UK as Passport to Fame)
      is a 1935 comedy film starring Edward G. Robinson as a law-abiding man
      who bears a striking resemblance to a killer, with Jean Arthur as his love interest.
      It was directed by John Ford from a screenplay by Jo Swerling and Robert Riskin
      based on a story by W.R. Burnett originally published in Collier's in August 1932.
      Burnett was also the author of the source material for Robinson's
      screen break-through, Little Caesar.
      The story was remade in 1998 as the Bollywood film Duplicate.

      [IMG:http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne-%202/b5b6a356.jpg]

      User Review
      A real HOOT!
      10 June 1999 | by Norm Vogel ([email protected]) (S. Bound Brook, NJ)

      Edward G. Robinson has been stereotyped to the nth degree as

      THE "gangster" (even in Bugs Bunny cartoons!), so it's quite a surprise to see him in the role of a mild, meek clerk (who just happens to be a dead ringer for a gangster!).

      The split-screen scenes (where he plays both parts) are excellent & "seamless", and the comedy is heightened by the utterly ridiculous lengths the police go to to catch the gangster!

      In one scene, he (as the clerk) is eating lunch in a restaurant, is "spotted" as being the gangster, and within a matter of MINUTES the restaurant is surrounded by HUNDREDS of policeman, riot squads, & machine guns -- all to get the (wrong!) person!

      A refreshing comedy; you've got to see this film, if only for Robinson's acting!
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ethanedwards ().