The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987) (TV)

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    There are 6 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by The Ringo Kid.

    • The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987) (TV)

      THE ALAMO: 13 DAYS TO GLORY

      DIRECTED BY BURT KENNEDY
      THE FINNEGAN COMPANY/ FRIES ENTERTAINMENT
      BRIGGLE, HENNESSEY, CARROTHERS & ASSOCIATES



      Information from IMDb

      Plot Summary
      The story of the famed siege of the Alamo during the Texas Revolution,
      in which a small band of soldiers held off an overwhelming army under the Mexican general
      Santa Anna long enough to allow the Texan army to gather its strength.
      Written by Jim Beaver

      Full Cast
      James Arness ... Jim Bowie
      Brian Keith ... Col. Davy Crockett
      Alec Baldwin ... Col. William Barrett Travis
      David Ogden Stiers ... Col. Black
      Jim Metzler ... Maj. James Bonham
      Tom Schanley ... Pvt. Danny Cloud
      Fernando Allende ... Col. Alamonte (Santa Anna's nephew)
      Kathleen York ... Mrs. Susannah Dickinson
      Isela Vega ... Senora Cos
      Raul Julia ... Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Ana
      Gene Evans ... McGregor
      Michael Wren ... Juan Seguin
      Jon Lindstrom ... Capt. Almeron Dickinson
      Hinton Battle ... Joe (Travis' servant)
      David Sheiner ... Luis
      Noble Willingham ... Dr. Pollard
      Eloy Casados ... Gregorio
      Tony Becker ... George Taylor
      Thomas Callaway ... Col. James W. Fannin
      Lorne Greene ... Gen. Sam Houston
      Buck Taylor ... Buck Smith
      Jerry Potter ... Jacob Walker (as Jerry Potter)
      Grainger Hines ... Charles Despelier
      Tom Everett ... Major Evans
      Stan Ivar ... Doc Sutherland
      Ethan Wayne ... Edward Taylor
      Jan Tríska ... General Wolf
      Gary Kasper ... Major Wheelwright
      John Furlong ... Zanco
      Jay Baker ... Hayes
      Dale Swann ... Lt. Kimball
      Laura Fabian ... Lucia
      Loyda Ramos ... Senora Esparza
      Bel Hernandez ... Mina (as Bel Sandre)
      Laura Harring ... Santa Anna's bride (as Laura Martinez Harring)
      Nicky Blair ... John Jones
      Red West ... Cockran

      Writing Credits
      Lon Tinkle (book)
      Clyde Ware and
      Norman Morrill (as Norman McLeod Morrill)

      Produced by
      Stockton Briggle .... executive producer
      Richard Carrothers .... executive producer
      Bill Finnegan .... producer
      Patricia Finnegan .... producer (as Pat Finnegan)
      Dennis Hennessy .... executive producer
      Sheldon Pinchuk .... producer

      Original Music
      Peter Bernstein

      Cinematography
      John Elsenbach

      Trivia
      The final charge consists mostly of footage from The Last Command.

      Final film appearance of Lorne Greene.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Alamo Village - Highway 674, Brackettville, Texas, USA
      Brackettville, Texas, USA
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: (New Review) The Alamo Movies- The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987) (TV)

      The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987) was made for TV
      and directed by one of Duke's directors, Burt Kennedy.
      In fact the Duke connection goes on to include star James Arness, and Duke's son Ethan Wayne.

      It is also worth noting that this movie was the final film
      appearance of Lorne Greene.

      It also includes final charge footage from a previously reviewed movie
      The Last Command

      User Review
      Modest But Sincere
      22 December 2007 | by kayaker36 (Queens, NY)
      This made for television version of the legendary stand against hopeless odds is more objective, more realistic than earlier filmed versions of the events, though the one movie made after this went perhaps too far in humanizing the figures of Sam Houston, Bowie, Travis and Crockett.

      The focus here is on Jim Bowie, played with sharp, cynical detachment by James Arness who passed away in 2011 at age 88. Then 65, he made a comeback to acting after years away from the screen to do this part.

      Puerto Rican-born Raul Julia humanizes Gen. Santa Ana as no one since J. Carol Naish back in '54 had done. However, the Mexican dictator is portrayed as a lecherous, vainglorious popinjay--gaudier uniforms have never been seen before or since. He receives excellent advice from the European officers he has hired but, convinced of his own infallibility, he does not heed it. He also ignores the warning from one of his own staff officers that it is not "prudente" to divide one's army in the face of the enemy. The result is the disaster of San Jacinto.

      Alec Baldwin is the one actor whose age is appropriate to the character he plays: Col. William Travis. His portrayal is earnest. He is almost in awe of the older men who share command with him.

      The one jarring note was Brian Keith as Crockett. In a coonskin cap and carrying Ol' Betsy, he stumbles about as if he had wandered in from another movie. With no conviction in the portrayal, the character is reduced to a few stage conventions.

      The script reveals some historical facts overlooked or suppressed in earlier film versions. We learn that Jim Bowie was, in the person of Santa Ana, fighting his own brother-in-law. The Mexican soldiers performed poorly in part because they were armed with rifles left over from the Napoleonic Wars a generation earlier. "Santa Ana likes a bargain." Bowie wryly explains. The whole project of defending the former Spanish mission as a fort was courageous but militarily ill- advised--a fact explored in greater depth in the 2004 film "The Alamo".
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England
    • Re: (New Review) The Alamo Movies- The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987) (TV)

      This is a TV movie, and not one of the better ones. Burt Kennedy must have printed every frame of film he shot. In fact, several times he shows them over again to take up time. Travis' last stand on the well is repeated so often, it's almost laughable.
      Mrs. Dickinson is played as an in-your-face pioneer free spirit who tells off Santa Anna after the battle!
      One hopes that Brian Keith was smashed through the whole production because that would explain his mumbling, listless performance.
      The cribbed scenes from "The Last Command" don't mesh well with new footage that was shot at Alamo Village, using Wayne's set. The walls don't even match.
      I think everyone's heart was in the right place but there just wasn't enough money to insure a decent production.


      We deal in lead, friend.
    • Re: (New Review) The Alamo Movies- The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987) (TV)

      I think Arness was appearing on TV fairly regularly, in the TV Gunsmoke movies, and also the remake of Red River around the time of this film. They wanted to use footage from Duke's film for the battle, but according to Burt Kennedy, Michael Wayne wanted too much money for it. So they used the Last Command-which was at least decent in most scenes. In the end tho, it really wasn't much more accurate than Duke's version.
    • Re: (New Review) The Alamo Movies- The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987) (TV)

      I was headed for Dallas and stopped in Turkey,TX. in 2005 to see the Bob Wills museum. I talked to the head of the Texas Sate Historical society.
      What a gracious man, he was about 70. He told me the Alamo picture with Dennis Quaid was historically the most accurate picture.
      "A people that values their Privileges above it's Principles. Soon looses both." Dwight Eisenhower
    • Re: (New Review) The Alamo Movies- The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987) (TV)

      Gorch wrote:

      This is a TV movie, and not one of the better ones. Burt Kennedy must have printed every frame of film he shot. In fact, several times he shows them over again to take up time. Travis' last stand on the well is repeated so often, it's almost laughable.
      Mrs. Dickinson is played as an in-your-face pioneer free spirit who tells off Santa Anna after the battle!
      One hopes that Brian Keith was smashed through the whole production because that would explain his mumbling, listless performance.
      The cribbed scenes from "The Last Command" don't mesh well with new footage that was shot at Alamo Village, using Wayne's set. The walls don't even match.
      I think everyone's heart was in the right place but there just wasn't enough money to insure a decent production.


      We deal in lead, friend.

      The best spot on review of this very bad movie. One big disappointing film. I once ask Ethan if he wore the same rat-coon skin cap that his Dad wore. He wasn't sure.
      Brian Keith could not have been more miscasted.
      ''baby sister i was born game and intend to go out that way.''
    • I remember watching this movie when it came out thinking it wasn't THAT badly done even though much of it was pinched from other movies. Id watch it again because of the star power-minus alec baldwin.
      Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..