The Lone Ranger (2013)

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    There are 129 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by WaynamoJim.

    • The Lone Ranger (2013)

      THE LONE RANGER

      PRODUCED BY JERRY BRUCKHEIMER/JOHNNY DEPP
      DIRECTED BY GORE VERBINSKI
      JERRY BRUCKHEIMER PRODUCTIONS
      WALT DISNEY PICTURES



      Information from IMDb

      Plot Summary
      In the 1930s, an elderly Tonto tells a young boy the tale of John Reid, the Lone Ranger.
      An idealistic lawyer, he rides with his brother and fellow Texas Rangers
      in pursuit of the notorious Butch Cavendish. Ambushed by the outlaw and left for dead,
      John Reid is rescued by the renegade Comanche, Tonto, at the insistence
      of a mysterious white horse and offers to help him to bring Cavendish to justice.
      Becoming a reluctant masked rider with a seemingly incomprehensible partner,
      Reid pursues the criminal against all obstacles.
      However, John and Tonto learn that Cavendish is only part of a far greater injustice
      and the pair must fight it in an adventure that would make them a legend.
      Written by Kenneth Chisholm

      Full Cast
      Johnny Depp ... Tonto
      Armie Hammer ... John Reid (Lone Ranger)
      William Fichtner ... Butch Cavendish
      Tom Wilkinson ... Latham Cole
      Ruth Wilson ... Rebecca Reid
      Helena Bonham Carter ... Red Harrington
      James Badge Dale ... Dan Reid
      Bryant Prince ... Danny
      Barry Pepper ... Fuller
      Mason Cook ... Will
      JD Cullum ... Wendell
      Saginaw Grant ... Chief Big Bear
      Harry Treadaway ... Frank
      James Frain ... Barret
      Joaquín Cosio ... Jesus
      Damon Herriman ... Ray
      Matt O'Leary ... Skinny
      W. Earl Brown ... Mustached Ranger
      Timothy V. Murphy ... Fritz
      Gil Birmingham ... Red Knee
      Damon Carney ... Blaine
      Kevin Wiggins ... Clayton
      Chad Brummett ... Martin
      Robert Baker ... Navarro
      Lew Temple ... Hollis
      Joseph E. Foy ... Boy Tonto
      Leon Rippy ... Collins
      Stephen Root ... Habberman
      Randy Oglesby ... Shareholder
      Brad Greenquist ... Shareholder
      Rance Howard ... Engineer
      Leonard Earl Howze ... Homer
      Travis Hammer ... Young Cavendish
      Steve Corona ... Young Cole
      Matthew Page ... Soldier #3
      Jack Axelrod ... Telegraph Operator
      Christopher Hagen ... Preacher
      Freda Foh Shen ... Kai
      Margaret Bowman ... Fat Lady
      Luz P. Mendez ... Pilar
      Laina Loucks ... Rosalie
      Devon J. Adams ... Dancer (Red's
      Desirae Anslover ... Dancer (Red's)
      Charlotte Cormier ... Dancer (Red's)
      Megan Pribyl ... Dancer (Red's)
      Briana Van Schuyver ... Dancer (Red's)
      Julie Stracener ... Dancer (Red's)
      Chad Randall ... Pawing Drunk
      Jason E. Hill ... Mob Member
      Todd Anderson ... Mob Member
      Beth Bailey ... Mob Member
      Joanne Camp ... Glenda
      John Keating ... Young Crier (Hell on Wheels)
      Stephen Brodie ... Soldier #1
      Will Koberg ... Soldier #2
      Jack Chang ... Huang
      Tad Jones ... VP Colfax
      Robin McGee ... Old Crier
      Bob Rumnock ... Stove Pipe
      Grover Coulson ... Joe
      Tait Fletcher ... Grizzled Soldier
      Alex Knight ... Soldier #4
      Argos MacCallum ... Farmer
      David Midthunder ... Fuller's Native American Scout
      Allison Marie Volk ... Jane (as Allison Volk)
      Pokey LaFarge ... Band at Red's
      Joseph Glynn ... Band at Red's
      Adam Hoskins ... Band at Red's
      Ryan Koenig ... Band at Red's
      Tom E. Rostkowski ... Man Who Congratulates Cole
      Malachi Tsoodle-Nelson ... Red Knee's Young Warrior
      Sean Durham ... Cavalry Guard
      Anthony R. Burt ... Cavalry
      R.J. Kirkhope ... Cavalry
      Will Kirkhope ... Cavalry
      Kenneth Love ... Cavalry
      Erika Feerer ... Woman temperance
      Claudia Adams ... Townsperson (uncredited)
      Walter Anaruk ... Chinese Miner (uncredited)
      Phil Arnold ... Promontory Summit Band Conductor (uncredited)
      James P. Bennett ... (uncredited)
      Todd Bethke ... Train Passenger (uncredited)
      Elgin Cahill ... Railroad Worker (uncredited)
      Cabran E. Chamberlain ... Railroad Worker (uncredited)
      Gio Dangadze ... Indian (uncredited)
      Carter DuBois ... Railroad Worker (uncredited)
      Kristine Fambrough ... Train Car Temperance Woman (uncredited)
      Scott Flick ... Railroad Worker (uncredited)
      Toni Ann Gambale ... Saloon Girl (uncredited)
      James Grummitt ... Soldier 2 (uncredited)
      Greg Herman ... Train Passenger (uncredited)
      Andrew Hook ... Railway Worker (uncredited)
      Kyle Jacobson ... Dog Boy (uncredited)
      Jason D. Johnson ... Seamus O'Toole (uncredited)
      Albert Fry Jr. ... Town Dignitary (uncredited)
      Patrick Juarez ... Fair Man - Wild West Show (uncredited)
      Ashley M. Kalfas ... Parasole Lady (uncredited)
      Tonya Kay ... Specialty - Fire Fingers (uncredited)
      David Dustin Kenyon ... Train Passenger (uncredited)
      Edward Khmara ... Sheriff Patterson (uncredited)
      Dustin Lane ... Train Station Kid (uncredited)
      Hope McCurdy ... Contortionist (uncredited)
      Robb Moon ... Railroad
      Spiker (uncredited)
      Alexandria Morrow ... Reds Girl (uncredited)
      Nick W. Nicholson ... Saloon Guy (uncredited)
      Martin Palmer ... Constitution Fireman (uncredited)
      Tina Parker ... Helen (uncredited)
      Pablo Paz ... Farmhand Mobster (uncredited)
      Kathryn Phipps ... Temperance Lady (uncredited)
      Michael Neal Powell ... Townsman (uncredited)
      Ronnie Rodriguez ... Gentleman / Train Passenger (uncredited)
      Turner Ross ... Fairgoer (uncredited)
      Davin Ruggles ... Fair Child (uncredited)
      Liam Ruggles ... Fair Child (uncredited)
      Carlos Sepulveda ... Railroad Worker (uncredited)
      Steve Shaw ... Dignitary (uncredited)
      Joel Thingvall ... Sheriff Long Johns (uncredited)
      Aura Trentin ... Train Passenger (uncredited)
      Shannan Wagenman ... Fairground Woman (uncredited)
      Sean Weimorts ... Cavalry (uncredited)

      Produced
      Jerry Bruckheimer .... producer
      Johnny Depp .... executive producer
      Eric Ellenbogen .... executive producer
      Ted Elliott .... executive producer
      Eric McLeod .... executive producer
      Chad Oman .... executive producer
      Terry Rossio .... executive producer
      Mike Stenson .... executive producer
      Gore Verbinski .... producer

      Writing Credits
      Justin Haythe (screenplay) and
      Ted Elliott (screenplay) &
      Terry Rossio (screenplay)
      Ted Elliott (screen story) &
      Terry Rossio (screen story) and
      Justin Haythe (screen story)

      Original Music
      Hans Zimmer

      Cinematography
      Bojan Bazelli

      Trivia
      Andrea Riseborough and Sarah Gadon auditioned for a role.

      Jessica Chastain and Abbie Cornish were considered for the role of Rebecca Reid, but lost to Ruth Wilson.

      Johnny Depp's makeup and costume were inspired by artist Kirby Sattler's painting "I am Crow".

      The original Lone Ranger radio serials led to a spin-off radio serial, The Green Hornet. The title character's alter ego, Britt Reid, was John Reid's great nephew. Tom Wilkinson appeared in the remake of The Green Hornet.

      The first film to feature both Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter that is not directed by Tim Burton.

      Tonto means "fool" in Spanish. In Spanish versions of this film, Tonto is renamed Toro, which means "bull".

      It is the first time that the Jerry Bruckheimer Logo has created a railroad on the logo instead of an asphalt road, as seen in the trailer.

      The first film cinematographer Bojan Bazelli has shot with anamorphic lenses since Body Snatchers.

      This is the first version of "The Lone Ranger" in any medium in which the actor playing Tonto receives top billing.

      This is the first version of The Lone Ranger to be released in IMAX, as well as the first to receive a PG-13 rating.

      The fourth Disney film to receive a PG-13 rating, under the Disney banner, in the United States. The previous films were Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (not counting its sequels), Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time, and John Carter.

      In an interview, Johnny Depp thanked his stunt horse, Scout, for saving his life after a violent fall during filming. After Scout dragged Depp 25 feet, Scout jumped over him to avoid stepping on him. A clip of the fall shows the horse clearly jumping over Depp, and detaching him from the saddle. Depp suffered only minor bruises and scrapes, but says it could have been a lot worse if the horse had stepped on him.

      Though set in Colby, TX, the film includes obvious shots of Monument Valley, Utah, a favorite filming location for American director John Ford. According to Wikipedia, "Ford's evocative use of the territory for his Westerns has defined the images of the American West so powerfully that Orson Welles once said that other film-makers refused to shoot in the region out of fears of plagiarism."

      In the original radio series, Butch Cavendish and his men ambushed six Texas Rangers in the canyon called Bryan's Gap. The lead Ranger, Dan Reid, held the rank of Captain, and his brother John was already a Texas Ranger. The 25th Anniversary radio episode identified the other dead Rangers as Jim Bates, Sam Cooper, Jack Stacy, and Joe Brent.
      Share this
      Early in the film, one of the Texas Rangers refers to "Redleggers." They were slavery advocates who used violence and fraud in a failed attempt to coerce Kansans to adopt slavery in the mid-1850s.

      The book that John Reid refers to as his bible is "Two Treatises on Government" by John Locke.

      Near the film's climax, crates of explosives bearing the Giant Powder Company of San Francisco logo are visible. The Giant Powder Company was the United States' first licensed manufacturer of dynamite.

      The musical cue in the shot of Red sitting under the painting of a ballerina is the Swan Theme from Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake.

      As an homage to John Ford, the scene that introduces John Reid features passengers singing "Shall We Gather At The River". It was Ford's favorite hymn, included in at least five of his movies.

      This is not the fist time Johnny Depp has played a Native American. He played Rafael, a Native American, in his directorial debut The Brave, which due to bad reviews at Cannes was never released in the USA.

      One of the rangers waiting at the train stations has what is called a "redneck toothpick" in his mouth. It is actually called a baculum, which is an animal penile bone, most likely from a raccoon. Tonto later makes a trade while burying the man.

      Despite being one of the biggest box office disasters of 2013, Jerry Bruckheimer believes that The Lone Ranger will be, in years to come, rediscovered as a masterpiece, just like with films like The Wizard of Oz, Pinocchio, Fantasia, It's a Wonderful Life, Sleeping Beauty, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Shining, Blade Runner, A Christmas Story, Flashdance, and John Carter before. As he said in an interview with Vulture Magazine, "It reminds me of a critic who called 'Flashdance' a 'toxic dump.'" "Ten years later [the critic] said, 'This is really a good movie. I missed it.' I think ['Lone Ranger'] is going to be looked back on as a brave, wonderful film. I've been though this a lot with journalists. We made a movie years ago called "Flashdance" and I remember one journalist just giving us the worst review ever. Then, about five years later, we get this kind of love letter - that he totally "missed" it. That he loved the movie. And it's kind of the same with you that, any time it's on, you have to watch it. It happens, you know."

      Gore Verbinski, Jerry Bruckheimer, Armie Hammer, and Johnny Depp highly criticized the American critics for their reviews on The Lone Ranger, which they claim that they have criticized the film by its budget, production issues, and not on the film itself, and that they posted their "reviews" 7-8 months before the film was even released. It was also the similar manner of speaking when compared to John Carter, when critics criticized the film by its similar problems, but not the film itself. Armie Hammer shared a very interesting point on the matter, "If you go back and read the negative reviews, most of them aren't about the content of the movie, but more what's behind it. It's got to the point with American critics where if you're not as smart as Plato, your stupid. That seems like a sad way to live your life. "While we were making it we knew people were gunning for it. I think it was the popular thing when the movie hit rocky terrain they jumped on the bandwagon to try and bash it. They tried to do the same thing with to World War Z, it didn't work, the movie was successful. Instead they decided to slit the jugular of our movie."

      Spoilers
      The Lone Ranger comments that it has been 9 years since he last fired his gun. The movie was shot in 2012, 9 years since the Lone Ranger last appeared in the made for TV movie of the same name in 2003.

      Goofs
      Anachronisms
      The references to Sears & Roebuck, and the playing of "Stars and Stripes Forever", are premature by about 20 years.

      Texas was under reconstruction in 1869, and the Rangers had been disbanded. They were re-organized in 1872.

      The American Flag had 37 stars in 1869, not 50.

      During the 1933 prologue, Gene Autry's "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" can be heard through a loudspeaker. Autry recorded the song in 1935.

      A character refers to "Oklahoma". In 1869, it was known as Indian Territory.

      The health regulation threatened in the brothel did not exist until 1905.

      Twist-up lipstick was not invented until 1923.

      Continuity
      The sheriff and his deputies ride up to the train station on one set of horses. After the runaway train goes through the station, they ride off on a different set of horses.

      Errors in geography
      In the film the Transcontinental Railroad is built through Texas, and Promontory Point is in Texas. In real life the Transcontinental Railroad went nowhere near Texas, and Promontory Point is in Utah.

      Factual errors
      The Texas Rangers didn't wear badges until the late 1870s or early 1880s.

      Although the hymn "Shall we Gather at the River" is an homage to John Ford, it doesn't match the church woman's declaration "We are Presbyterians". The hymn was written by Baptist Pastor Robert Lowry in 1864. Presbyterians believe in infant Baptism by sprinkling, so it's not likely that they would sing a hymn about baptism by submersion in a river.

      The vultures in the burial scene are a European species not found in North America.

      The Wendigo is from the legends of the Algonquian nations, and the Comanche are not part of that.

      Revealing mistakes
      When Tonto is burying the rangers, John's white hat is on the ground. In one shot it has been stepped on. In the next shot the hat is not smashed down.

      Continuity
      After Butch cuts out Dan's heart, Dan is sitting with his head turned to the right and his eyes open. However, when Tonto squats in front of him to retrieve his necklace, his head is turned to the front and his eyes are closed

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Creede, Colorado, USA
      Albuquerque Studios - 5650 University Boulevard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
      Monument Valley, Utah, USA
      Monument Valley, Arizona, USA
      Moab, Utah, USA
      Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Chinle, Arizona, USA
      Sunland, Los Angeles, California, USA
      Hurley, New Mexico, USA
      Angel Fire, New Mexico, USA
      (exterior scenes)
      Lone Pine, California, USA
      (Tonto flash back)
      Durango, Colorado, USA
      (train scenes)
      Abiquiu, New Mexico, USA
      Shiprock, New Mexico, USA
      Alamosa, Colorado, USA
      Puerco Valley, New Mexico, USA
      Texas, USA

      Watch the Trailer

      [extendedmedia]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dN9opF1iVWo[/extendedmedia]
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 13 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Re: Classic Movie Westerns- The Lone Ranger (2013)

      The Lone Ranger is a 2013 American western action film produced
      by Walt Disney Pictures and Jerry Bruckheimer Films and directed by Gore Verbinski.
      Based on the radio series of the same name, the film stars Johnny Depp as Tonto,

      the narrator of the events, and Armie Hammer as John Reid (The Lone Ranger).
      It relates Tonto's memories of the duo's earliest efforts to subdue the immoral actions of the corrupt
      and bring justice in the American Old West.

      William Fichtner, Barry Pepper, Ruth Wilson, James Badge Dale,
      and Helena Bonham Carter
      also are featured in supporting roles.

      The film marks the first theatrical film featuring the Lone Ranger and Tonto characters in more than 32 years

      Filming was plagued with production problems and budgetary concerns,
      which at one point, led to the film's premature cancellation.
      The Lone Ranger was released theatrically in the United States on July 3, 2013.
      Upon release, the film received mixed to negative reviews and was a commercial disappointment;
      grossing $217.8 million worldwide against an estimated $215 million budget.

      User Review
      Gr8 Movie! don't let the critics sway you. it is really a fun Good movie
      3 July 2013 | by LJ Logan (United States)

      The action and humor are awesome, and the relationship between the two is excellent.
      You can just tell that this was as much of a fun ride making it as it is watching it.
      Johnny Depp steals it when he is on, you just are mesmerized by what might he do next.
      Its the subtleties that he adds that really makes him so good and fun to watch.
      Johnny and Armie play well off each other. Don't let the so called "professional "critics" make your choices.
      Let's face it critics get paid to over analyze and pick things apart.
      If you want a fun movie to see that certainly gives yours monies worth the movie fits the bill.
      Can't wait for the DVD and special features.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 6 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • (New Review) Classic Movie Westerns- The Lone Ranger (2013)

      Ryan Gosling in Talks for The Lone Ranger?

      Source: TheWrap
      April 15, 2011


      TheWrap is reporting that Ryan Gosling is in talks to star in the title role of Walt Disney Pictures' The Lone Ranger opposite Johnny Depp's Tonto.

      The site says that the talks are "early, and Gosling's schedule might not permit him to take the role." Gore Verbinski (Rango, the first three "Pirates of the Caribbean" films) will direct the film for producer Jerry Bruckheimer.

      Gosling is scheduled to shoot Warner Bros. Pictures' Logan's Run this fall.

      "The Lone Ranger" began life as a 1930s radio show. Its popularity led to movie serials, TV shows, comic strips and comic books, toys, novels and more. Actor Clayton Moore became the Lone Ranger in 1949, starring in films and a long lived TV series in the 1950s. He continued to wear the mask in many personal appearances until his passing in 1999.


      Read more: Ryan Gosling in Talks for The Lone Ranger? - ComingSoon.net comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=76514#ixzz1JpAZNSka
      They'd never forget the day,the stranger rode into town
    • (New Review) Classic Movie Westerns- The Lone Ranger (2013)

      Ryan Gosling in Talks for The Lone Ranger?

      Source: TheWrap
      April 15, 2011


      TheWrap is reporting that Ryan Gosling is in talks to star in the title role of Walt Disney Pictures' The Lone Ranger opposite Johnny Depp's Tonto.

      The site says that the talks are "early, and Gosling's schedule might not permit him to take the role." Gore Verbinski (Rango, the first three "Pirates of the Caribbean" films) will direct the film for producer Jerry Bruckheimer.

      Gosling is scheduled to shoot Warner Bros. Pictures' Logan's Run this fall.

      "The Lone Ranger" began life as a 1930s radio show. Its popularity led to movie serials, TV shows, comic strips and comic books, toys, novels and more. Actor Clayton Moore became the Lone Ranger in 1949, starring in films and a long lived TV series in the 1950s. He continued to wear the mask in many personal appearances until his passing in 1999.


      Read more: Ryan Gosling in Talks for The Lone Ranger? - ComingSoon.net comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=76514#ixzz1JpAZNSka
      They'd never forget the day,the stranger rode into town
    • Re: Ryan Gosling: The Lone Ranger?

      Phantomstranger wrote:

      opposite Johnny Depp's Tonto.


      NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO, please, NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!

      This guy is a complete creep. Just looking at him makes my skin crawl.

      "I am not intoxicated - yet." McLintock!

    • Re: Ryan Gosling: The Lone Ranger?

      Phantomstranger wrote:

      opposite Johnny Depp's Tonto.


      NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO, please, NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!

      This guy is a complete creep. Just looking at him makes my skin crawl.

      "I am not intoxicated - yet." McLintock!

    • Re: Ryan Gosling: The Lone Ranger?

      He's not my fave (by a long shot), but he IS a talented actor, and more than that, he's believable in the roles he plays.

      As for Hollywood and their remakes, they've ALWAYS done them! Sometimes they're great, most times not.

      Some of JW's movies were remakes - Three Godfathers among them.