John Ford

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  • Interesting article but I always get suspicious of articles that get their first facts rong, like the date They Were Expendable was made.


    I find it curious that an arch-conservative would be quoting McBride as an authority, because his books are very biased, one of the more left wing writers who sees Ford as the documenter of American social history and has a great deal of trouble reconciling the fact that he used John Wayne in his films.


    I found McBride pretty damn nasty about John Wayne, he seemed to take a quite vindictive pride in telling Navahos that Wayne was racist and making sure they threatened to shoot him if he returned to Monument Valley, (which Wayne did and the Navahos didn't).


    And McBride was the writer who lied his way into an interview with Ford and Ford had great fun boasting to Henry Fonda he not revealing anything. McBride claims he was on the set of the Shootist but it sounds a bit like he got short shift from Wayne too. Maybe one of the reasons he is so nasty.


    I get a bit annoyed at 70's liberals who have discovered Ford now trying to write their politics into their books about him and John Wayne ( and for the record I'm not a conservative) but some of those writers seem to be running vendettas. McBride amongst them.


    dee

  • THE GRAPES OF WRATH


    DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD
    PRODUCED BY DARRYL. F. ZANUCK
    TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX


    ..



    ...


    Plot Summary


    Set in the Thirties, Oklahoma is a dustbowl.
    Tom Joad returns to his home after a jail sentence
    to find his family kicked out of their farm due to forecloseure.
    He catches up with them on his Uncles farm,
    and joins them the next day as they head for California and a new life.
    After terrible trials en route they become little more than slave labor.
    However Tom and his family refuse to knuckle under.


    Based on the John Steinbeck novel.


    Written by ethanedwards

    Full Cast


    Henry Fonda ... Tom Joad
    Jane Darwell ... Ma Joad
    John Carradine ... Casy
    Charley Grapewin ... Grandpa
    Dorris Bowdon ... Rose of Sharon
    Russell Simpson ... Pa Joad
    O.Z. Whitehead ... Al
    John Qualen ... Muley
    Eddie Quillan ... Connie
    Zeffie Tilbury ... Grandma
    Frank Sully ... Noah
    Frank Darien ... Uncle John
    Darryl Hickman ... Winfield
    Shirley Mills ... Ruth Joad
    Roger Imhof ... Thomas
    Grant Mitchell ... Caretaker
    Charles D. Brown ... Wilkie
    John Arledge ... Davis
    Ward Bond ... Policeman
    Harry Tyler ... Bert
    William Pawley ... Bill
    Charles Tannen ... Joe
    Selmer Jackson ... Inspection Officer (as Selmar Jackson)
    Charles Middleton ... Leader
    Eddy Waller ... Proprietor (as Eddie Waller)
    Paul Guilfoyle ... Floyd
    David Hughes ... Frank
    Cliff Clark ... City Man
    Joe Sawyer ... Bookkeeper (as Joseph Sawyer)
    Frank Faylen ... Tim
    Adrian Morris ... Agent
    Hollis Jewell ... Muley's Son
    Robert Homans ... Spencer
    Irving Bacon ... Driver
    Kitty McHugh ... Mae
    Leon Brace ... Migrant
    Henry Brahe ... Migrant
    Scotty Brown ... Migrant
    Cal Cohen ... Migrant
    Cecil Cook ... Migrant
    Helen Dean ... Migrant
    Billy Elmer ... Migrant
    Sidney Hayes ... Migrant
    E.J. Kaspar ... Migrant
    L.F. O'Connor ... Migrant
    Walton Pindon ... Migrant
    Wally Albright ... Boy who bragged of eating chicken (uncredited)
    Erville Alderson ... Arkansas storekeeper (uncredited)
    Josephine Allen ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Frank Atkinson ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Arthur Aylesworth ... Father (uncredited)
    Trevor Bardette ... Jule, bouncer at dance (uncredited)
    John Binns ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Joe Bordeaux ... Migrant (uncredited)
    George P. Breakston ... Boy (uncredited)
    Buster Brodie ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Hal Budlong ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Nora Bush ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Russ Clark ... Guard (uncredited)
    Shirley Coates ... Girl in migrant camp (uncredited)
    Harry Cording ... Deputy (uncredited)
    Jim Corey ... Buck Jackson, witness at dance (uncredited)


    Gino Corrado ... Chef (uncredited)
    Delmar Costello ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Jane Crowley ... Migrant (uncredited)
    W.H. Davis ... Migrant (uncredited)
    John Dilson ... Bookseller (uncredited)
    Lillian Drew ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Ralph Dunn ... Deputy (uncredited)
    Thornton Edwards ... Motorcycle cop (uncredited)
    Pat Flaherty ... Deputy (uncredited)
    James Flavin ... Guard (uncredited)
    Francis Ford ... (unconfirmed) (uncredited)
    Emily Gerdes ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Tyler Gibson ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Barney Gilmore ... Migrant (uncredited)
    William Haade ... Deputy with shotgun (uncredited)
    Ben Hall ... Gas station attendant in Bakersfield (uncredited)
    Dean Hall ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Edna Hall ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Cliff Herbert ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Charles Herzinger ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Herbert Heywood ... Gas station attendant (uncredited)
    Harry Holden ... Migrant (uncredited)
    David Kirkland ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Rex Lease ... Cop (uncredited)
    Hazel Lollier ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Mae Marsh ... Muley's wife (uncredited)
    Louis Mason ... Man in camp (uncredited)
    Harry Matthews ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Scotty Mattraw ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Walter McGrail ... Gang leader (uncredited)
    Jules Michelson ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Walter Miller ... New Mexico border guard (uncredited)
    Philip Morris ... Guard (uncredited)
    Frank Newburg ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Frank O'Connor ... Deputy #1 (uncredited)
    George O'Hara ... Clerk (uncredited)
    Ted Oliver ... State policeman (uncredited)
    Inez Palange ... Woman in camp (uncredited)
    Steve Pendleton ... Gas station attendant #2 in Needles (uncredited)
    Jack Pennick ... Camp helper (uncredited)
    Walter Perry ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Rose Plumer ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Chauncey Pyle ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Bob Reeves ... Deputy (uncredited)
    Gladys Rehfeld ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Waclaw Rekwart ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Dick Rich ... Keene Ranch guard (uncredited)
    Gloria Roy ... Waitress (uncredited)
    Peggy Ryan ... Hungry girl (uncredited)
    Robert Shaw ... Gas station attendant #1 in Needles (uncredited)
    Lee Shumway ... Deputy (uncredited)
    Georgia Simmons ... Woman (uncredited)
    C.B. Steele ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Al Stewart ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Harry Strang ... Fred, trucker #2 at diner (uncredited)
    Paul Sutton ... Deputy (uncredited)
    Harry Tenbrook ... Deputy / Troublemaker (uncredited)
    Charles Thurston ... Migrant (uncredited)
    D.H. Turner ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Tom Tyler ... Deputy handcuffing Casy (uncredited)
    Pearl Varvalle ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Eleanore Vogel ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Max Wagner ... Guard (uncredited)
    Harry Wallace ... Migrant (uncredited)
    John Wallace ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Glen Walters ... Woman who gets shot (uncredited)
    Jack Walters ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Frank Watson ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Jim Welch ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Charles West ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Dan White ... Poor man walking with woman in transient camp (uncredited)
    Norman Willis ... Joe, shot at Floyd (uncredited)
    Bill Wolfe ... Square-dance caller (uncredited)
    Bill Worth ... Migrant (uncredited)
    Darryl F. Zanuck ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)



    Wingate Smith .... assistant director (uncredited)




    Writing credits

    Nunnally Johnson (screenplay)


    John Steinbeck (novel "The Grapes of Wrath")


    Cinematography by
    Gregg Toland


    Music Department
    Alfred Newman .... musical director
    Danny Borzage .... musician: accordion (uncredited)


    Filming Locations


    20th Century Fox Studios - 10201 Pico Blvd., Century City, Los Angeles, California, USA
    (studio)
    Arizona, USA
    Backlot, 20th Century Fox Studios - 10201 Pico Blvd., Century City, Los Angeles, California, USA
    California, USA
    Canejo Ranch, California, USA ("Keene Ranch")
    Chatsworth, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Daggett, California, USA (second unit)
    Gallup, New Mexico, USA
    Irvine Ranch, Tustin, California, USA
    Iverson Ranch, Chatsworth, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico, USA
    Lamont, California, USA (Weedpatch Migrant Camp)
    Lasky Mesa, Chatsworth, Los Angeles, California, USA (Joad and Graves farms)
    Los Angeles, California, USA
    McAlester, Oklahoma, USA(2nd unit)
    Needles, California, USA(River bathing, "Welcome To Needles" sign, and Carty's Camp.)
    New Mexico, USA
    Oklahoma, USA
    Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, USA
    San Fernando Valley, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Santa Rosa, New Mexico, USA(service station, diner, bridge, train sequence)
    Sayre, Oklahoma, USA (Courthouse)
    Tehachapi, California, USA (second unit)
    Topock, Arizona, USA (bridge crossing into California)

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 10 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • A great moody, broody classic film.
    I think this is a great movie, with JF at his best.
    Henry Fonda is at his most superb as Tom Joad,
    and Joan Darwell, who won an Oscar
    for her portayal as Ma, was magnificent.
    A couple of Duke 'Pals' and JF's Stock company here,
    namely
    Ward Bond ,John Qualen, Jack Pennick and JF's brother Francis



    Won 2 Academy Awards, for
    Best Director- John Ford,
    Best Actress in a Supporting Role- Jane Darwell


    Nominated
    Best Actor in a Leading Role- Henry Fonda
    Best Film Editing- Robert L. Simpson
    Best Picture
    Best Sound, Recording- Edmund H. Hansen (20th Century-Fox SSD)
    Best Writing, Screenplay- Nunnally Johnson

    to be continued

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 7 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • I've loved this film since the first time I saw it when played on WTBS about 19 or so years ago. It's been on TCM twice recently and I watched it both times. Thanks for talking about it Keith ;-))

    Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..

  • Well, I just watched/listened to the analogue track on the Wagonmaster DVD and am thoroughly impressed with my own former lack of insight and insensitivity.
    Dobie Carey, Peter Bogdonovich and his 1966 John Ford interview tapes, absolutely enlighten and inform this movie. When Ford asked Carey if he wanted to be in a western with Ben Johnson, Dobie asked "Is Duke in it?"
    Ford repled, Don't you want to make a movie without Duke?
    Dobie's story about an admirerer of Joann Dru is also a hoot.



    We deal in lead, friend.

  • I JUST SAW YOUNG MR LINCOLN FOR THE FIRST TIME THE OTHER NITE.AN EXCELLENT FILM.HENRY FONDA WAS EXCELLENT AS LINCOLN, ONE OF HIS BEST PERFORMANCES.A VERY STYLISH FILM AND TO SUM IT ALL UP a very beautiful epic poem.

  • ringo kid!
    I also highly recommend another Ford film made in 39.
    Drums Along the Mohawk... also with Henry Fonda,Claudette Colbert,John Carradine and Ward Bond.

    ''baby sister i was born game and intend to go out that way.''

  • IVE SEEN DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK ABOUT 50 TIMES.ANOTHER GREAT FILM.ITS ONE OF MY FAVOURITE AS WELL.ONE OF THE GREAT MANY SCENES IS Fonda pursued by Indians for a long chase over woodlands, finally wearing out his pursuers who collapse from sheer exhaustion.

  • I was always curious about any John Ford/Richard Widmark connection. Ford spent quite a bit of time of the set of The Alamo, and had to know Duke and Widmark weren't the best of friends. I personnally have always been a fan of Richard Widmark and all his work. But I wonder why Ford ended up starring Widmark in Two Rode Together and Cheyenne Autumn. I would have to guess that John Ford either liked Richard Widmark inspite of any problems Duke had with him. Or possibly the studios forced Widmark on him-but I doubt that. Does anyone have any info on that situation?

  • I was always curious about any John Ford/Richard Widmark connection. Ford spent quite a bit of time of the set of The Alamo, and had to know Duke and Widmark weren't the best of friends. I personnally have always been a fan of Richard Widmark and all his work. But I wonder why Ford ended up starring Widmark in Two Rode Together and Cheyenne Autumn. I would have to guess that John Ford either liked Richard Widmark inspite of any problems Duke had with him. Or possibly the studios forced Widmark on him-but I doubt that. Does anyone have any info on that situation?


    According to Harry Carey Jr. in his book Company of Heroes,
    on the set of Two Rode Together,
    Widmark and Ford had a 'mutual admiration society',
    with him being 'amazed' at Ford's directional skills.
    According to Harry, Ford 'loved' Widmark,
    and is quoted as saying

    Quote

    Even a gone screwy Ford is
    a hundred times better, than all those other idiots.


    There seems no doubt that Widmarks opinion of Duke,
    did not make the slightest difference to his relationship with Ford.

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

  • John Ford will be honored with a U.S. postage stamp next year!





    With the Great Film Directors stamps, the U.S. Postal Service honors four great filmmakers who captured the many varieties of the American experience. These extraordinary directors created some of the most iconic scenes in American cinema. They gave audiences an unforgettable (and in some cases, deeply personal) vision of life.


    The stamp art combines a portrait of each man with an example of one of his most iconic works.


    For the John Ford stamp — the first of four designs to be revealed — the background recalls a scene from The Searchers, an influential Western starring John Wayne and making Ford’s characteristic use of the American landscape.


    Art Director Derry Noyes designed these stamps using art by award-winning illustrator Gary Kelley, who created the images using pastels on paper.


    The Great Film Directors stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps. Forever stamps are always equal in value to the current First-Class Mail one-ounce rate.
    The remaining three designs will be revealed at a later date.


    THE SEARCHERS © C V Whitney Pictures, Inc. Licensed By: Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved.