Decision at Sundown (1957)

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    There is 1 reply in this Thread. The last Post () by ethanedwards.

    • Decision at Sundown (1957)

      DECISION AT SUNDOWN
      DIRECTED BY BUDD BOETICCHER
      A SCOTT-BROWN PRODUCTION
      PRODUCERS-ACTORS CORPORATION
      COLUMBIA PICTURES


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      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      Bart Allison arrives in Sundown planning to kill Tate Kimbrough.
      Three years earlier he believed Kimbrough was responsible for the death of his wife.
      He finds Kimbrough and warns him he is going to kill him but gets pinned down
      in the livery stable with his friend Sam by Kimbrough's stooge Sheriff and his men.
      When Sam is shot in the back after being told he could leave safely,
      some of the townsmen change sides and disarm the Sheriff's men
      forcing him to face Allison alone.
      Taking care of the Sheriff, Allison injures his gun hand and must now face Kimbrough left-handed.
      Written by Maurice VanAuken

      Directed
      Budd Boetticher

      Writing Credits
      Charles Lang ... (screenplay) (as Charles Lang Jr.)
      Vernon L. Fluharty ... (from a story by)

      Cast
      Randolph Scott ... Bart Allison
      John Carroll ... Tate Kimbrough
      Karen Steele ... Lucy Summerton
      Valerie French ... Ruby James
      Noah Beery Jr. ... Sam (as Noah Beery)
      John Archer ... Dr. John Storrow
      Andrew Duggan ... Sheriff Swede Hansen
      James Westerfield ... Otis
      John Litel ... Charles Summerton
      Ray Teal ... Morley Chase
      Vaughn Taylor ... Mr. Baldwin
      Richard Deacon ... Reverend Zaron
      H.M. Wynant ... Spanish
      Bob Steele ... Irv (uncredited)
      and many more ....

      Produced
      Harry Joe Brown ... producer
      Randolph Scott ... associate producer

      Music
      Heinz Roemheld

      Cinematography
      Burnett Guffey ... director of photography

      Trivia
      Opening credits: The characters and incidents portrayed and the names used herein are fictitious,
      and any similarity to the name, character or history of any person is entirely accidental and unintentional.

      At the beginning when you first see Tate Kimbrough, you can see the fingernail
      on his left index finger is black, indicating he bruised it at some point around filming.

      Goof
      Anachronisms
      Several coils of rope hanging in the barn where Scott is trapped are secured with modern tape.

      Memorable Quote

      Filming Locations
      Agoura, California, USA

      Watch the Movie

      Decision at Sundown
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Decision at Sundown is a 1957 Technicolor western directed by Budd Boetticher
      and starring Randolph Scott.

      One of seven Boetticher/Scott western collaborations that also includes
      Seven Men from Now, The Tall T, Buchanan Rides Alone, Westbound,
      Ride Lonesome and Comanche Station.

      Duke 'Pal' Noah Beery Jr. stars in this one

      423138-westerns-decision-at-sundown-poster.jpg

      User Review

      Good Boetticher western where Scott is the ugly hero.
      19 June 2005 | by alexandre michel liberman (tmwest) (S. Paulo, Brazil)

      alex wrote:

      Randolph Scott in this film is a man obsessed with revenge.

      He is the ugly hero and even his loyal sidekick Noah Beery Jr. gets fed up with his obsession. At the same time his unjust cause will make him free the town from a bully (John Carrol)and his gang. It will also prevent a woman (Karen Steele) from making a mistake. For the town he will become a hero but he will hate himself for what he has done. We can compare him with James Stewart in Anthony Mann's "The Naked Spur", which was also an ugly hero. Boetticher knew how to bring out the best of Randolph Scott.He was also great in staging very well the shootouts, as he does here. Even though he was more known for working with Burt Kennedy, he thought Charles Lang, who wrote the screenplay was just as good,
      as mentioned in his book "When in Disgrace".
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ethanedwards ().