Thieves' Gold (1918)

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    • Thieves' Gold (1918)

      THIEVES GOLD

      DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD (Jack Ford)
      UNIVERSAL FILM MANUFACTURING COMPANY


      INFORMATION FROM IMDb/Wikipedia

      Plot Summary
      Cheyenne Harry tries to help his outlaw friend Padden evade arrest
      after Padden has drunkenly shot another man.
      In the end, the two mismatched friends fight it out, leaving Padden dead.
      In a romantic subplot,
      Harry's fiancée Alice leaves him, but finally returns.

      Cast
      Harry Carey ... Cheyenne Harry
      Molly Malone ... Alice Norris
      Vester Pegg ... Curt Simmons
      John Cook ... Uncle Larkin
      L.M. Wells ... Savage
      Helen Ware ... Mrs. Savage
      Harry Tenbrook ... 'Colonel' Betoski
      Martha Mattox Martha Mattox ...
      Mrs. Larkin
      Millard K. Wilson ... Undetermined Role (uncredited) (unconfirmed)

      Directed
      John Ford ... (as Jack Ford)

      Writing Credits
      Frederic R. Bechdolt ... (story "Back to the Right Trail")
      George Hively ... (scenario)
      George Hively ... (screenplay)

      Cinematography
      John W. Brown
      Ben F. Reynolds
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 10 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Thieves' Gold (1918)

      Thieves' Gold is a 1918 American Western film directed by John Ford and featuring Harry Carey.

      It is considered to be a lost film.

      Harry Carey as Cheyenne Harry once again paired with Molly Malone,
      and Ford regulars Vester Pegg ,Harry Ternbrook

      52077e0f07e6c4edcf18630576c73b96.jpg

      User Review

      Creative Geography
      5 July 2004 | by Single-Black-Male (London, England)

      sbm wrote:

      The one thing that John Ford is good at is making use of time and space. In this film he begins to show that geography is as much a part of the American Western genre as the gun battles. It is almost like the iconography of Elvis Presley and Rock n Roll. It's not just the music, it's the visuals. To shoot a Western film you have to make use of the open landscape in the Mid-West, and Ford is beginning to do that in this silent offering without having to rely on gun battles. He collaborates with his audience by surprising them in his films. He offers them more than what they expect so that they can enter into the universe of the characters.

      This project shows early promise for the young director
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 10 times, last by ethanedwards ().