The Furies (1950)

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    • The Furies (1950)

      THE FURIES

      DIRECTED BY ANTHONY MANN
      PRODUCED BY HAL W. WALLIS
      WALLIS-HJAZEN INC.
      PARAMOUNT PICTURES


      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      The 1870s, New Mexico territory: T.C. Jeffords is a cattle baron who built his ranch,
      the Furies, from scratch. He borrows from banks, pays hired hands with his own script
      ("T.C.'s"), and carries on low-level warfare with the Mexicans who settled the land
      but are now considered squatters. He has enemies, including Rip Darrow,
      a saloon owner who's father T.C. took land from.
      His headstrong daughter, Vance, has a life-long friend in one of the Mexicans,
      her heart set on Rip, and dad's promise she'll run the Furies someday.
      Her hopes are smashed by Rip's revenge, a gold-digger who turns T.C.'s head,
      and T.C.'s own murderous imperialism.
      Is Vance to be cursed by fury and hatred?
      Written by jhailey

      Cast
      Barbara Stanwyck ... Vance Jeffords
      Wendell Corey ... Rip Darrow
      Walter Huston ... T. C. Jeffords
      Judith Anderson ... Flo Burnett
      Gilbert Roland ... Juan Herrera
      Thomas Gomez ... El Tigre
      Beulah Bondi ... Mrs. Anaheim
      Albert Dekker ... Mr. ReynoldsJohn Bromfield ...
      Clay Jeffords
      Wallace Ford ... Scotty Hyslip
      Blanche Yurka ... Herrera Mother Louis Jean Heydt ...
      Bailey
      Frank Ferguson ... Dr. Grieve
      Charles Evans ... Old Anaheim
      Movita ... Chiquita (as Movita Casteneda)
      Craig Kelly ... Young Anaheim
      Myrna Dell ... Dallas Hart

      Directed
      Anthony Mann

      Writing Credits
      Charles Schnee ... (screenplay)
      Niven Busch ... (from a novel by)

      Produced
      Hal B. Wallis ... producer (as Hal Wallis)

      Music
      Franz Waxman

      Cinematography
      Victor Milner
      Lee Garmes ... (uncredited)

      Trivia
      Final film of Walter Huston,

      Cinematographer Lee Garmes shot part of this film, uncredited.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Empire Ranch, Sonoita, Arizona, USA
      San Pedro River, Arizona, USA
      Sonoita, Arizona, USA
      Skeleton Canyon, Arizona, USA
      Arizona, USA
      Paramount Studios - 5555 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA (studio)

      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England
    • The Furies is a 1950 American Western film
      directed by Anthony Mann and starring Barbara Stanwyck, Wendell Corey,
      and Walter Huston in his last film performance.

      In 2008, the film was released on DVD in the United States by The Criterion Collection



      User Review

      As good as Mann's best
      29 June 2008 | by zetes (Saint Paul, MN)
      This Antony Mann Western is little-known compared to his collaborations with James Stewart or Man of the West or a good number of other Mann films, but it's an equal to his best work. Barbara Stanwyck and Walter Huston (in his final performance) star as a daughter and her father, powerful ranchers who own the titular land. Their relationship, much as the title suggests, has a psycho-sexual tinge. When men call on Stanwyck, her father balks. And when hoochies cling to Huston, well, then things get real ugly! The Furies shows Mann bringing a lot of his noir skills to the Western genre. One can easily see how that genre influenced Mann's characterizations, but, in terms of film-making, he had largely moved on. The Furies is just dark and often nasty. I have to wonder why the film is so little known. My thought is that almost all Westerns feature male protagonists, with the most notably exception being Johnny Guitar. I'm not going to rag too much on that film, because I do like it, but The Furies is far superior. Stanwyck was rarely better. I might actually rate this as her best. Huston went out on one of his best performances. It's hard to believe he died before the film was even released with as much energy as he shows. My only real complaint with the movie is that it peaks too early. The standoff at the Herrera's fort is one of the greatest sequences in the history of the genre, and it's so good that the remainder of the film drags a bit. Still, a masterpiece. Thanks again, Criterion!
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England


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