Tom Horn (1980)

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    • Tom Horn (1980)

      TOM HORN

      DIRECTED BY WILLIAM WIARD
      PRODUCED BY STEVE McQUEEN
      MUSIC BY ERNEST GOLD
      FIRST ARTISTS
      A SOLAR-FRED WEINTRAUB PRODUCTION
      WARNER BROS.

      steve-mcqueen-and-richard-farnsworth-in-tom-horn-1980-large-picture.jpg

      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      A renowned former army scout is hired by ranchers to hunt down rustlers
      but finds himself on trial for the murder of a boy when he carries out his job too well.
      Tom Horn finds that the simple skills he knows are of no help
      in dealing with the ambitions of ranchers and corrupt officials
      as progress marches over him and the old west.
      Written by Keith Loh

      Cast
      Steve McQueen ... Tom Horn
      Linda Evans ... Glendolene Kimmel
      Richard Farnsworth ... John C. Coble
      Billy Green Bush ... U.S. Marshal Joe Belle
      Slim Pickens ... Sheriff Sam Creedmore
      Peter Canon ... Assistant Prosecutor
      Elisha Cook Jr. ... Stablehand (as Elisha Cook)
      Roy Jenson ... Lee Mendenhour
      James Kline ... Arlo Chance
      Geoffrey Lewis ... Walter Stoll
      Harry Northup ... Thomas Burke
      Steve Oliver ... 'Gentleman' Jim Corbett
      Bill Thurman ... Ora Haley
      Bert Williams ... Judge
      Bobby Bass ... Corbett's Bodyguard
      Mickey Jones ... Brown's Hole Rustler
      B.J. Ward ... Cattle Baron
      Richard Brewer ... Corbett's Bodyguard
      Mel Novak ... Corbett's Bodyguard
      Tom Tarpey ... Corbett's Bodyguard
      Bob West ... Corbett's Bodyguard
      Richard Kennedy ... John Cleveland
      Larry Strawbridge ... Ian MacGregor
      Pat E. Johnson ... Ora Haley's Bodyguard (as Pat Johnson)
      Jim 'Two Dogs' Burgdorf ... Dart
      Jerry Wills ... Rash
      Walter Wyatt ... Isam
      Bob Orrison ... Matt
      Fargo Graham ... Auctioneer
      Leo Hohler ... Auction Deputy
      Erik Owens ... Boy at Auction
      Tom Ferguson ... Brown's Hole Rustler
      Jos Massangale ... Brown's Hole Rustler
      Dave Moordigian ... Brown's Hole Rustler
      Michael E. Perry ... Brown's Hole Rustler
      Jim Burk ... Slaughter House Man (as Jimmy H. Burk)
      Bill Hart ... Slaughter House Man
      Dan Corry ... Windmill Man
      and many, many more...

      Directed
      William Wiard

      Writing Credits
      Thomas McGuane ... (screenplay)
      Bud Shrake ... (screenplay)

      Produced
      Steve McQueen ... executive producer
      Michael Rachmil ... associate producer
      Fred Weintraub ... producer
      Sandra Weintraub ... associate producer

      Music
      Ernest Gold

      Cinematography
      John A. Alonzo ... director of photography (as John Alonzo)

      Trivia
      Five directors worked on this film, but were either fired
      or left because of disagreements with Steve McQueen.
      It is widely believed that McQueen directed much of the movie himself.

      Filmed at the beginning of 1979, Steve McQueen was already very ill with cancer.
      He had difficulty breathing, and began coughing up blood towards the end of filming,
      but assumed he had pneumonia.

      The film was a critical and commercial failure on release.

      Steve McQueen's weight loss was said to be due to a crash diet.

      Steve McQueen gave up smoking cigarettes after developing a persistent cough at the end of 1978,
      just before filming began.

      According to an article about Steve McQueen's western films in Cowboys & Indians Magazine
      (to celebrate the DVD release of Wanted: Dead or Alive (1958),
      McQueen thoroughly researched the life of Tom Horn by spending time
      with famed western novelist Louis L'Amour, who had many of Horn's letters in his private collection.

      Due to an unfavorable critical response the film only had a limited release
      and was soon withdrawn from theaters.

      At the premiere Steve McQueen denied newspaper reports that he had lung cancer.

      Steve McQueen had struggled to find film work after the failure of An Enemy of the People (1978).

      In February 1980 Steve McQueen's cancer was found to have spread. On 11 March 1980, just 17 days before this film premiered, the "National Enquirer" reported that his condition was terminal.

      The film was heavily re-edited ahead of its March 1980 release, but still flopped.

      When Gary Combs tested the replica gallows trapdoor system, the "Peter Pan" safety cable broke,
      causing him to suffer a rope burn on his neck when the breakaway knot released, saving his life.

      The type of gallows used to hang Horn from are called "Julian Gallows".
      This device uses water to initiate the action.
      Not as efficient as the more conventional method,
      reportedly the first use of the contraption (not for Horn)
      required a wait of 30 minutes before the trap dropped.

      When the film was released some critics suggested that Steve McQueen
      had lost his charismatic screen presence after being away for too long.
      He had retired from acting after The Towering Inferno (1974),
      returning three years later to make An Enemy of the People (1978) which was never properly released.

      William Goldman wrote an early version of the screenplay,
      with Don Siegel attached as director.
      Siegel dropped out after disagreements with Steve McQueen
      (whom Goldman found to be extremely eccentric), and Goldman's script,
      which McQueen rejected, was later the basis for Mr. Horn (1979).
      This was rushed into production to compete with this film,
      making it onto the airways several months ahead of the film's much-delayed release.

      United Artists were planning a film about Tom Horn at the same time, to star Robert Redford.
      The project was canceled due to this film, but then revived for television as Mr. Horn (1979).

      According to director Arthur Penn, the real-life Tom Horn was the inspiration
      for the villainous Marlon Brando character in his film The Missouri Breaks (1976).
      In interviews, Penn described his screenwriter, Thomas McGuane,
      as an expert on the life of Tom Horn, which may be why McGuane is
      also one of the screenwriters on this rather different version of Horn's adventures.

      After Don Siegel quit as director, he was replaced with Elliot Silverstein
      and then James William Guercio, who was fired after three days by Steve McQueen,
      who then wanted to direct himself but DGA rules forbidding actors
      from taking over direction once filming had begun scotched these plans
      and instead TV movie director William Wiard was brought in to finish the film.

      Tom Horn's rifle (a Winchester 1894 in .30-30) was also used to put down
      the famous bronco Steamboat (the basis for the 'bucking horse and rider'
      on Wyoming license plates) after he was injured at a rodeo in Salt Lake City in 1914.

      The rifle Horn uses to such deadly effect in the film
      is an original Winchester Model 1876 in .45-60 caliber,
      fitted with a custom tang sight. Manufactured from 1877-1894, the Model '76
      was an obsolete arm by the turn of the century, when the events of the story take place.
      All the available historical sources state that Horn
      actually used a .30-30 Winchester Model 1894 for his controversial activities
      as a "stock detective" in Wyoming. Horn gave this rifle to rancher C.B. Irwin
      not long before Horn's execution on November 20, 1903.
      It resides today in the collection of the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City.

      Post-production was fraught - the producers attempting both a linear version
      of the film and then another telling the story in flashback,
      before settling on the former approach.
      The film was still being reedited ahead of its March 1980 release date,
      but to no avail - it received poor reviews and was another box office failure.

      Steve McQueen initially wanted to adapt Harold Pinter's play Old Times
      but First Artists insisted that he instead film this,
      a script they had owned for some time, as the final film
      in the star's three picture deal he had signed with them under Warner Bros.

      This was the first and only Steve McQueen vehicle to receive an R rating.

      In 1947, it was announced that John Wayne would be starring in " The Saga of Tom Horn"
      but it was never made.

      Average Shot Length = ~6.5 seconds. Median Shot Length = ~6.4 seconds.

      This was William Wiard's only feature film directing credit.

      Spoilers
      An alternate ending was shot where the townspeople filed out
      of the building where Horn was executed.
      The sole person left in the room was one of the "kid deputies" standing guard at the door.

      Goofs
      Continuity
      At he beginning of the horse-breaking scene the horse's hair is a mess and covered in mud.
      Once the horse is lassoed, the horse is suddenly clean and brushed.
      At the conclusion of the scene, as it runs away, the horse is muddy again.

      Factual errors
      In the opening sequence, the wording says, "In 1901 he drifted into Wyoming 'Territory'".
      Wyoming had been a state since 1890.

      The rifle Steve McQueen uses in the film is a Winchester Model 1876,
      stated to be chambered in .45-60 Winchester, however,
      the rifle was actually chambered in .45-75 Winchester.
      The real life Tom Horn carried a Winchester Model 1894 chambered in .30-30 Winchester.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Sonoita, Arizona, USA
      Patagonia, Arizona, USA
      Old Tucson - 201 S. Kinney Road, Tucson, Arizona, USA
      Portal, Arizona, USA
      Empire Ranch, Sonoita, Arizona, USA
      San Rafael Ranch State Park, Patagonia, Arizona, USA
      San Raphael Valley, Arizona, USA
      Coronado National Forest, Arizona, USA
      Mescal, Arizona, USA
      Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

      Watch the Movie

      [extendedmedia]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE9TmO-gSxg[/extendedmedia]
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Tom Horn is a 1980 Western film about the legendary lawman, outlaw, and gunfighter.
      It starred Steve McQueen in one of his last roles as the title character
      and was based on Horn's own writings

      Production
      Since the troubled production and disastrous release of An Enemy of the People,
      McQueen had once again struggled to find work.
      He priced himself out of roles in a mooted Towering Inferno sequel and Raise the Titanic,
      was rejected for the Salkinds' Superman film due to his growing weight,
      turned down a role in Close Encounters of the Third Kind
      and walked out on Richard Fleischer's planned adaptation of Tai-Pan
      when the second $1m installment of his announced $10m fee failed to arrive
      (the actor having earned $1m for no work already).
      However, after his divorce from Ali MacGraw, McQueen decided to get back into films.
      He initially wanted to adapt Harold Pinter's play Old Times but First Artists
      insisted that he instead film Tom Horn, a script they had owned for some time,
      as the final film in the star's three picture deal he had signed with them under Warner Bros.



      The film had been meant to go into production in 1978 but faced stiff competition,
      with United Artists also planning a film about Horn as a vehicle for Robert Redford.
      The latter dropped out and the film, about Horn's younger years,
      was eventually made by CBS as a four-hour TV movie named Mr. Horn with David Carradine starring.
      This aired just as the Warners/First Artists film went into production, receiving poor ratings.
      McQueen ordered several rewrites to the script, while original director Don Siegel
      left to be replaced by first Elliot Silverstein and then James William Guercio,
      who was fired after three days by McQueen.
      McQueen then wanted to direct himself but DGA rules forbidding actors from taking
      over direction once filming had begun scotched these plans and instead
      TV movie director William Wiard was brought in to finish the film.
      This was Wiard's only feature film directing credit.

      Post-production was similarly fraught - the producers attempting both a linear version
      of the film and then another telling the story in flashback,
      before settling on the former approach.

      The film was still being reedited ahead of its March 1980 release date, but to no avail -
      it received poor reviews and was another box office failure.
      Tom Horn was the first and only McQueen vehicle to receive an R rating.

      It was during production that McQueen had trouble breathing and was later determined
      to have a rare form of lung cancer called malignant mesothelioma.

      Tom-Horn-Poster.jpg

      User Review

      "I am afraid of losing my ability to be able to come and go as I please."
      17 November 2007 | by Righty-Sock (Mexico)
      Directed by William Wiard and based on a true story, "Tom Horn" opens in 1901, in Wyoming, where McQueen meets John C. Coble (Richard Farnsworth) who offered him to ease up at his place for a while… Tom accepted, but he said I'd to earn my keep…

      Seeing Horn with great ability with a rifle, and after speaking with the Association, John asks him to eliminate the rustlers who have completely wiped out their herd profits not to mention what the buzzards and the predators have done to their cash crops…

      But after one incident has disturbed the Association in town, and the rustling has stopped, they determined to get rid of Horn forgetting he was only doing what they hired him to do… Mc Queen plays well the Indian tracker "scared to death of lobster, the man of the West "afraid to lose his freedom and not be able to get back up in those hills again."

      Linda Evans is appealing as the school teacher from Hawaii who saw a man of the Old West trying to live in the New…

      Richard Farnsworth is the loyal friend John C. Coble who was quite sure that Tom never killed that kid… John advices him not to try to break out of the jail… He knows he can do it, but it's just admitting his guilt if he tries…

      Billy Green Bush is the U.S. Marshal Joe Belle who asks the newspaperman to sit behind the door and write lying down what he hears real good…

      Slims Pickens is the old Sheriff Sam Creed who arrested Tom…

      With a legendary hero, great photography and good direction "Tom Horn" is very good Western to watch…
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England