The Doolins of Oklahoma (1949)

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    There are 3 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by lasbugas.

    • The Doolins of Oklahoma (1949)

      THE DOOLINS OF OKLAHOMA
      aka The Great Manhunt

      DIRECTED BY GORDON DOUGLAS
      PRODUCED BY HARRY JOE BROWN/ RANDOLPH SCOTT
      PRODUCERS-ACTORS CORPORATION
      COLUMBIA PICTURES CORPORATION

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      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      When the Daltons are killed at Coffeeville, gang member Bill Doolin arriving late escapes but kills a man. Now wanted for murder, he becomes the leader of the Doolin gang. He eventually leaves the gang and tries to start a new life under a new name. But the old gang members appear and his true identity becomes known. So once again he becomes an outlaw trying to escape from the law.
      Written by Maurice VanAuken

      Directed
      Gordon Douglas

      Writing Credits
      Kenneth Gamet ... (story and screenplay)

      Cast
      Randolph Scott ... Bill Doolin / Bill Daley
      George Macready ... Marshal Sam Hughes
      Louise Allbritton ... Rose of Cimarron
      John Ireland ... Bitter Creek
      Virginia Huston ... Elaine Burton
      Charles Kemper ... Thomas 'Arkansas' Jones
      Noah Beery Jr. ... Little Bill
      Dona Drake ... Cattle Annie
      Robert Barrat ... Marshal Heck Thomas (as Robert H. Barrat)
      Lee Patrick ... Melissa Price
      Griff Barnett ... Deacon Burton
      Frank Fenton ... Red Buck
      Jock Mahoney ... Tulsa Jack Blake (as Jock O'Mahoney)
      James Kirkwood ... Reverend Mears
      Robert Osterloh ... Wichita Smith
      Virginia Brissac ... Mrs. Burton
      John Sheehan ... Dunn - Wayside Innkeeper
      and many more...

      Produced
      Harry Joe Brown ... producer
      Randolph Scott ... associate producer (uncredited)

      Music
      George Duning
      Paul Sawtell
      Marlin Skiles ... (uncredited)

      Cinematography
      Charles Lawton Jr. ... director of photography

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Janss Conejo Ranch, Thousand Oaks, California, USA
      Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, California, USA
      Columbia/Warner Bros. Ranch - 411 North Hollywood Way, Burbank, California, USA
      Diaz Lake, Lone Pine, California, USA
      Iverson Ranch - 1 Iverson Lane, Chatsworth, Los Angeles, California, USA

      Watch the Movie

      [extendedmedia]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9J-UUXwzEws[/extendedmedia]
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 28 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • The Doolins of Oklahoma (1949)

      The Doolins of Oklahoma (1949)(aka The Great Manhunt), is an American western
      directed by Gordon Douglas and starring Randolph Scott,
      George Macready, Louise Allbritton, John Ireland

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      User Review

      Good Complex Western
      12 July 2014 | by dougdoepke (Claremont,USA)

      doug wrote:

      Good Scott western, with lots of action, interesting characters, and a solid script. Doolin (Scott) may be a bankrobber but he's also capable of noble deeds. In short, he's a good-bad guy of the sort the iron-jawed Scott could play to perfection. Here he leads a gang of outlaws whose members are known to us by name. Funny thing about the movies. Even bad guys can be humanized enough so that we care about them. That happens more or less with these gang members.


      And get a load of the familiar Alabama Hills that Scott and Buddy Boetticher explored in their great Ranown series of oaters. Director Douglas does some effective staging with the Neolithic slabs, worthy of Boetticher. There're some other good touches by Douglas. I especially like the little boy who stares Scott down in church. I don't think I've seen anything quite like it. Surprisingly, veteran screen baddie George Macready plays a federal marshal, which took some getting used to. And what a sweetheart Virginia Huston is. Who wouldn't give up a life of crime for her. It's that element, I think, that lends the ending such poignancy.

      All in all, it's a well done 90-minutes by Columbia, somewhere between an A-production and a B. I'm just sorry Scott never got the recognition as a western star that he deserved.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 28 times, last by ethanedwards ().