Wells Fargo (1937)

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    There are 2 replies in this Thread. The last Post () by ethanedwards.

    • Wells Fargo (1937)

      WELLS FARGO

      DIRECTED & WRITTEN BY FRANK LLOYD
      MUSIC BY VICTOR YOUNG
      PARAMOUNT PICTURES


      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      The life and career of a Wells Fargo official frames this fictionalized account
      of the express company's formation.

      Cast
      Joel McCrea ... Ramsay MacKay
      Bob Burns ... Hank York - a Wanderer
      Frances Dee ... Justine Pryor
      Lloyd Nolan ... Dal Slade
      Henry O'Neill ... Henry Wells
      Mary Nash ... Mrs. Pryor
      Ralph Morgan ... Nicholas Pryor
      Johnny Mack Brown ... Talbot Carter (as John Mack Brown)
      Porter Hall ... James Oliver
      Jack Clark ... William Fargo
      Clarence Kolb ... John Butterfield
      Robert Cummings ... Dan Trimball - Prospector
      Granville Bates ... Bradford - Banker
      Harry Davenport ... Ingalls - Banker
      Frank Conroy ... Ward - Banker
      Brandon Tynan ... Edwards - Newspaper Publisher
      Peggy Stewart ... Alice MacKay
      Bernard Siegel ... Pawnee
      Stanley Fields ... Abe - Prospector
      Jane Dewey ... Lucy Dorsett Trimball
      Frank McGlynn Sr. ... Lincoln (as Frank McGlynn)
      and many more...

      Directed
      Frank Lloyd

      Writing Credits
      Paul Schofield ... (screen play) &
      Gerald Geraghty ... (screen play) and
      Frederick J. Jackson ... (screen play) (as Frederick Jackson)
      Stuart N. Lake ... (based on a story by)
      Duke Atteberry ... (contributor to dialogue) (uncredited)
      Howard Estabrook ... (contributor to screenplay construction and dialogue) (uncredited)
      Seena Owen ... (suggestion of subject) (uncredited)
      Eddie Welch ... (contributor to dialogue) (uncredited)
      Produced
      Howard Estabrook ... associate producer
      Frank Lloyd ... producer
      William LeBaron ... executive producer (uncredited)

      Music
      Victor Young

      Cinematography
      Theodor Sparkuhl ... (photographed by)

      Trivia
      Paramount claimed the set to recreate San Francisco's Portsmouth Square was the largest ever built. Seven acres of a hilltop were leveled and graded, and 32 buildings were erected.

      Assistant propman Jack Leys accidentally shot himself when he reached into the prop chest for a gun.

      One of over 700 Paramount productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. It was released on DVD 24 November 2015 as part of the Universal Vault Series.

      Film debut of Peggy Stewart.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      Angels Camp, California, USA
      Chico, California, USA
      Iverson Ranch - 1 Iverson Lane, Chatsworth, Los Angeles, California, USA
      Kernville, California, USA
      Malibu Lake, California, USA
      Napa Valley, California, USA
      Paramount Ranch - 2813 Cornell Road, Agoura, California, USA
      Sonora, California, USA
      Canon City, Colorado, USA
      Columbia State Historic Park, 11255 Jackson Street, Columbia, California, USA
      Parrott's Ferry, California, USA

      Watch the Movie

      [extendedmedia]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74tirFjkh7w [/extendedmedia]

      Wells Fargo (1937) is an American Western film directed by
      Frank Lloyd and starring Joel McCrea, Bob Burns and Frances Dee.
      This is the third of four movies in which real life husband and wife McCrea and Dee starred together.

      It was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Sound (Loren L. Ryder).

      User Review

      Extremely episodic and disjoint.
      30 January 2017 | by MartinHafer (Bradenton, Florida)
      This film is a very fictionalized account of the early days of Wells Fargo---long before it metastasized into the gigantic mega-bank that charges innumerable service fees like it does today. However, instead of focusing on the big-wigs at the company, it focuses on a fictional man, Ramsay (Joel McCrea) and his many difficulties he had establishing banking, transportation and mail services in the wild west. It also focuses on his marriage--one that eventually became very rocky and problematic.

      The problem with this film is that it is extremely episodic--with giant jumps in time here and there. As a result, it comes off more like a Cliff Notes version of a story instead of a rich and complete on. Compacting the story much more would have helped immensely, as the characters come off as very stiff and distant to the audience. Not a bad film but one that really should have been a lot better considering the large budget and cast. More money should have been spent on the script and less on extras and sets.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 12 times, last by ethanedwards ().

    • Wells Fargo (1937)

      Wells Fargo (1937) is an American Western film directed by
      Frank Lloyd
      and starring
      Joel McCrea, Bob Burns and Frances Dee.
      This is the third of four movies in which real life husband and wife McCrea and Dee starred together.

      It was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Sound (Loren L. Ryder).

      produto_Foto1_7436500.jpg

      User Review

      Extremely episodic and disjoint.
      30 January 2017 | by MartinHafer (Bradenton, Florida)

      MARTIN wrote:


      This film is a very fictionalized account of the early days of Wells Fargo---long before it metastasized into the gigantic mega-bank that charges innumerable service fees like it does today. However, instead of focusing on the big-wigs at the company, it focuses on a fictional man, Ramsay (Joel McCrea) and his many difficulties he had establishing banking, transportation and mail services in the wild west. It also focuses on his marriage--one that eventually became very rocky and problematic.

      The problem with this film is that it is extremely episodic--with giant jumps in time here and there. As a result, it comes off more like a Cliff Notes version of a story instead of a rich and complete on. Compacting the story much more would have helped immensely, as the characters come off as very stiff and distant to the audience. Not a bad film but one that really should have been a lot better considering the large budget and cast. More money should have been spent on the script and less on extras and sets.
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England

      The post was edited 14 times, last by ethanedwards ().