The Great Man's Lady (1942)

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    • The Great Man's Lady (1942)

      THE GREAT MAN'S LADY

      DIRECTED & PRODUCED BY WILLIAM A. WELLMAN
      MUSIC BY VICTOR YOUNG
      PARAMOUNT PICTURES


      INFORMATION FROM IMDb

      Plot Summary
      In Hoyt City, a statue of founder Ethan Hoyt is dedicated, and 100 year old Hannah Sempler Hoyt
      (who lives in the last residence among skyscrapers) is at last persuaded to tell her story to a 'girl biographer'. Flashback: in 1848, teenage Hannah meets and flirts with pioneer Ethan; on a sudden impulse, they elope. We follow their struggle to found a city in the wilderness, hampered by the Gold Rush, star-crossed love, peril, and heartbreak. The star "ages" 80 years.
      Written by Rod Crawford

      Cast
      Barbara Stanwyck ... Hannah Sempler Hoyt
      Joel McCrea ... Ethan Hoyt
      Brian Donlevy ... Steely Edwards
      K.T. Stevens ... Girl Biographer (as Katharine Stevens)
      Thurston Hall ... Mr. Sempler
      Lloyd Corrigan ... Mr. Cadwallader
      Etta McDaniel ... Delilah
      Frank M. Thomas ... Frisbee
      William B. Davidson ... Senator Knobs
      Lillian Yarbo ... Mandy
      Helen Lynd ... Bettina
      Mary Treen ... Persis
      Lucien Littlefield ... City Editor
      John Hamilton ... Senator Grant
      Fred 'Snowflake' Toones ... Pogey
      and many more...

      Produced
      William A. Wellman ... producer
      Buddy G. DeSylva ... executive producer (uncredited)

      Music
      Victor Young

      Cinematography
      William C. Mellor

      Trivia
      To practice for her role as a woman of 107, Barbara Stanwyck visited several retirement homes and interacted with the elderly women to emulate their mannerisms.

      One of over 700 Paramount productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. Its initial television broadcasts took place in Los Angeles Thursday 8 January 1959 on KNXT (Channel 2) and in St. Louis Friday 9 January 1959 on KMOX (Channel 4). In Seattle, it first aired 24 July 1959 on KIRO (Channel 7), in Phoenix 8 August 1959 on KVAR (Channel 12), in Pittsburgh 26 October on KDKA (Channel 2), in Detroit 29 October 1959 on WJBK (Channel 2), in Toledo 19 December 1959 on WTOL (Channel 11), in Omaha 22 December 1959 on KETV (Channel 7), in Grand Rapids 27 December 1959 on WOOD (Channel 8), in Chicago 29 December 1959 on WBBM (Channel 2), in New York City 26 March 1960 on WCBS (Channel 2), in Minneapolis 9 November 1960 on WTCN (Channel 11), in Philadelphia 22 December 1962 on WCAU (Channel 10), and in San Francisco 3 February 1963 on KPIX (Channel 5). It was released on DVD 27 April 2010 as one of six titles in Universal's Barbara Stanwyck Collection and on 13 July 2015 as a single as part of the Universal Vault Series; since that time, it's also enjoyed occasional airings on Turner Classic Movies.

      "Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on June 28, 1943 with Barbara Stanwyck reprising her film role.

      Hannah's age at the end of the film has been variously reported as 107 and 109.

      Katharine Stevens, director Sam Wood's daughter, has the same name as Barbara Stanwyck's mother, albeit a different spelling.

      Goofs
      Continuity
      When the Hoyts stand at the sight of their future city, they're at the foot of a hill,
      but moments later they're on top of a hill.

      Memorable Quotes

      Filming Locations
      The Pinney House - 225 North Lima Street, Sierra Madre, California, USA
      Paramount Studios - 5555 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA (studio)
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England
    • The Great Man's Lady is a 1942 American western film directed by
      William A. Wellman, and starring Barbara Stanwyck and Joel McCrea.
      The film is based on the short story "The Human Side" by Viña Delmar.

      gml2.jpg

      User Review

      "Spring never comes again...perhaps in the Indian Summer, we'll meet once more."
      19 September 2009 | by moonspinner55 (las vegas, nv)

      moon wrote:

      Fake history, played for bathos. On Founders Day in the thriving metropolis of Hoyt City, eager-beaver reporters swarm the home of a 109-year old woman, reputedly once married to founding father Ethan Hoyt; she's surely got a tall tale to tell, beginning when she was just a teenager in 1848 Philadelphia. Barbara Stanwyck begs, borrows, and barters to finance the future of idealistic husband Joel McCrea, who owns a great stretch of land with nothing on it but a shack. The narrative skitters over such crucial story-elements as railroad access, livestock, a water supply, financial aid--all for the sake of marital melodrama. Brian Donlevy, as a shady gambler who has immediate eyes for Stanwyck, does what he can with a character conceived as an afterthought (he plugs up the holes left behind by a screenplay spanning many years' time); Stanwyck and McCrea fare a bit better, though this story is seldom credible, and is often downright loopy. Production is handsome enough, and the intentions behind the film are apparently heartfelt, but there isn't a surprise in its entire 91 minutes. ** from ****
      Best Wishes
      Keith
      London- England