John Ford Stock Company

There are 52 replies in this Thread which has previously been viewed 78,962 times. The latest Post () was by EasternWester.

Participate now!

Don’t have an account yet? Register yourself now and be a part of our community!



  • That makes sense to me because many of the same actors were used during that combined time.

  • Thanks for your work, Keith.


    Seems to me that anyone who was in Pappy's Troup should remain "his". Perhaps, when mentioning, JWST, you could make it an addendum to Pappy's. Or, if that isn't to yall's liking, Maybe you could list all of Duke's but with an asterisk or something that denotes they were originally part of the JFST. Also, I think that the ones Pappy directed should remain on his original list whether Batjac was involved or not. Duke got quite a few of his own after Pappy was no longer there. But Pappy developed the whole idea, and to me, he should receive full credit for the ones he directed. Just "feels" right to me.


    KEITH

    God, she reminds me of me! DUKE

  • Could an argument be made for John Dierkes? He was in The Alamo and then had a small uncredited part in The Comancheros which I know wasn't produced by Batjac http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0226109/?ref_=tt_cl_t14


    He is not listed as part of the John Ford Stock Company,
    and I can't place him any of the director's movies?


    He would not be included as part of the
    John Wayne Stock Company either,
    as he only made one movie for Duke

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 4 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • The gentleman in my profile avatar, Warren Hymer, was part of the John Ford Stock Company as well. He appeared prominently in five of Ford's films: Men Without Women, Born Reckless, Up the River, Seas Beneath and Submarine Patrol. Unfortunately, Warren's alcoholism cost him many acting jobs and ultimately cost him his life.

    "I'm the hardest egg ever hatched on the toughest street in the world. The Bowery Kid--That's Me!"
    (The Lone Star Ranger, 1930)