Up the River (1930)

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  • UP THE RIVER


    DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD
    PRODUCED BY WILLIAM FOX
    FOX FILM CORPORATION



    Information from IMDb


    Plot Summary
    Two prisoners, Saint Louis and Dannemora Dan, escape during a theatrical production in order to go to the aid of Steve, a former prisoner whose past is about to be exposed by the man who framed Judy unless Steve agrees to help him commit another crime.
    Written by Ed Stephan


    Full Cast
    Spencer Tracy ... Saint Louis
    Claire Luce ... Judy Fields
    Warren Hymer ... Dannemora Dan
    Humphrey Bogart ... Steve Jordan
    William Collier Sr. ... Pop
    Joan Marie Lawes ... Jean (as Joan Lawes)
    Ward Bond ... Inmate Socked by Saint Louis (uncredited)
    Joe Brown ... Deputy Warden (uncredited)
    Bob Burns ... Slim - Bazooka Player (uncredited)
    Eddy Chandler ... Guard (uncredited)
    Edythe Chapman ... Mrs. Jordan (uncredited)
    Harvey Clark ... Nash (uncredited)
    Dick Curtis ... New Inmate (uncredited)
    Mike Donlin ... Upstate Baseball Manager (uncredited)
    Noel Francis ... Sophie (uncredited)
    Althea Henley ... Cynthia Jordan (uncredited)
    Elizabeth Keating ... May (uncredited)
    Helen Keating ... June (uncredited)
    Richard Keene ... Dick (uncredited)
    Sharon Lynn ... Edith La Verne (uncredited)
    George MacFarlane ... Whiteley (uncredited)
    Wilbur Mack ... Honest John Jessup (uncredited)
    Louise Mackintosh ... Mrs. Massey (uncredited)
    Goodee Montgomery ... Kit (uncredited)
    Robert Emmett O'Connor ... Prison Warden (uncredited)
    Robert Parrish ... Boy (uncredited)
    Claude Payton ... Guard (uncredited)
    Steve Pendleton ... Morris (uncredited)
    Pat Somerset ... Beauchamp (uncredited)
    John Swor ... Clem (uncredited)
    Mildred Vincent ... Annie (uncredited)
    Johnnie Walker ... Happy (uncredited)
    Morgan Wallace ... Frosby (uncredited)
    Adele Windsor ... Minnie (uncredited)
    Carol Wines ... Daisy Elmore (uncredited)


    Writing Credits
    Maurine Dallas Watkins (story)
    William Collier Sr. uncredited
    John Ford uncredited


    Original Music
    James F. Hanley
    Joseph McCarthy


    Cinematography
    Joseph H. August


    Trivia
    This is the only movie in which Humphrey Bogart and Spencer Tracy co-star. Although Tracy and Bogart were good friends, they never appeared in another movie together, as Bogart was tied to a contract with Warner Bros. for much of his career while Tracy was bound first to Fox, and then (most famously) to MGM. When the freelance era rolled around in the 1950s and both were free of their studio contracts, the two talked about co-starring together in a picture, but according to Tracy's lover Katharine Hepburn, they could never agree on who would get top billing (although Tracy was the more respected thespian, Bogart was more popular at the box office; however, after playing second-fiddle to Clark Gable for many years at MGM, Tracy wasn't about to accept second billing at that time in his career). Hepburn recalled they considered a suggested compromise that would have created an "X"-shaped credit in which Humphrey Tracy would have co-starred with Spencer Bogart, when read normally.


    The first of Humphrey Bogart's feature-length films to be released, on October 12, 1930. His second, "A Devil with Women", was released six days later, on October 18.


    This is the first John Ford film in which Spencer Tracy appeared: their second collaboration took place three decades later, when Tracy starred in Ford's The Last Hurrah. It is strange to realize that these two great Irish American icons only collaborated two times (Tracy narrated How the West Was Won, one of the sequences of which was shot by Ford, but that doesn't count as a true collaboration), but for most of their careers, they were bound to different studios, Ford to 20th Century-Fox and Tracy to M.G.M. By the time the freelance era rolled around in the late 1950s, Tracy was appearing in very few movies.


    Spencer Tracy received a 2-week leave of absence from a hit Broadway show in order to appear in this film. This required the film to be shot under a very tight production schedule.


    Broadway producer Herman Shumlin granted Spencer Tracy two weeks leave from his hit drama "The Last Mile" after the actor appealed to him for the opportunity to work for John Ford in this picture.


    Memorable Quotes


    Watch this clip


    [extendedmedia]

    [/extendedmedia]

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 3 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • Up the River is a Pre-Code comedy film about escaped convicts,
    and featuring Spencer Tracy and Humphrey Bogart
    in their feature film debuts.


    Take a look at the attachments below, and see
    if you think it is a young Duke,
    as if we are sure, we can once again re-write the Filmography



    From
    Prison Movies
    Prison stuff. In prison movies.

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • Previous posts from the thread


    MYSTERY FILM with JW?

    Quote
    […]


    I would say that that could easily be him, and that might even be Yakima Canutt standing behind him.


    Chester :newyear:


    The Mrs. and I were looking at John Ford movies for 1930, and thought the movie might be, "Up the River", as several pictures we saw had the same type of stone work as your picture, plus everyone was wearing the same kind of cloths.


    Chester :newyear: and the Mrs. :angel1:


    The one thing that jumped out at me, Elly, is the way the man is standing. That is the classic John Wayne stance! Just might be him.


    Mark



    We can almost be once again updating
    Duke's Filmography, and more opinions on this?

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • I just had this from Neil (RoughRider)

    Here are quotes from a Peter Bogdanovich interview with John Wayne that shows he was actually on the set of Up the River. This adds credence to the still of what could be Wayne in the background:



    A funny thing happened with Ford after The Big Trail. He was a strange character, you know. After I did that picture, I came back, and he was making Up the River. I went over and said, “Hi, coach.” Nothing. I thought he didn’t hear me. So I figured, Oh, well, he didn’t even see me. The next time I saw him I went, “Hi, coach, hi.” And again I didn’t get anything. So the next time I just went right up in front of him and went, “Hi, coach.” And he turned and talked to somebody else. I thought, That’s that — he won’t speak to me. I don’t know how the hell I can communicate.


    About two years later, I was in Catalina with Ward, having a belt, and Barbara [Ford], his daughter — she was a little girl then — she ran in and said, ‘Daddy wants to see you.” I said, “Whoa, wait a minute, Barbara, you got the wrong boy — must be Ward.” She said, “No, it’s you, Duke.” So I said, “Yeah, honey, run along, you know this is a bar.” So his wife, Mary Ford, came to the door and she said, “Duke, come here. Jack is expecting you out there.” I said, “All right.” So I went out to the Araner, his boat, and I go aboard — I remember Jim Tully was there and four or five guys — and Jack was in the middle of a goddamn story, and he looked up at me and said, “Hi, Duke, sit down.” And to this goddamn day I don’t know why he didn’t speak to me for two years.



    I found this while visiting this website: <http://www.sheilaomalley.com/?p=38180>

    Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind

  • Wow! GREAT detective work, Elly!


    John Ford may have been a brilliant director, but he was also really a jerk, and this is just one more story to further cement my opinion in that regard. Yet in spite of it, he somehow developed a great loyalty among people as well. Personally, I am hard pressed to understand why that is.


    Mrs. C :angel1:

  • Hi Sue

    thank you HOWEVER,

    ALL CREDIT for this must go to NEIL (RoughRider) in this case I was just the messenger.

    People never cease to amaze me in thier behaviour towards others. Thank the Lord I am blessed with lots of gracious and respectful people in my life and work.

    Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind

  • With this little revelation that John Wayne was on the set of Up The River, combined with the screen shot that Elly found from that film of what definitely looks like John Wayne, I think this is another piece of important evidence that shows that he just might of had a bit part in Up The River. I am about 85% sure that he was.

    "I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them" It may be time worn, but it's the best life-creed I know.

  • Shall we therefore list is as an official visible in our Filmography?
    Your Yes or No's please!



    Hello Keith

    I would say No until I have seen a better copy of this film which I have on order so may say YES in 10 days or so!!

    is that enough yes and nos for you LOL

    I spotted an uncredited Ward Bond when I watched this last time but did not note the time or take any screen shots. If you want me to let me know.

    Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind

  • With this little revelation that John Wayne was on the set of Up The River, combined with the screen shot that Elly found from that film of what definitely looks like John Wayne, I think this is another piece of important evidence that shows that he just might of had a bit part in Up The River. I am about 85% sure that he was.


    Another revelation of this, is that, it can now be said that Duke was in a film with Humphrey Bogart, and Spencer Tracy.


    Chester :newyear:

  • Hi


    I am currently reading Print The Legend - The Life and Times of John Ford by Scott Eyman.


    When discussing 'Up the River' Eyman says that Ford brought Spencer Tracy from New York to star in the film and treated him like royalty.


    Eyman also quotes that during the making of the film


    'During production, John Wayne came back on the lot from long weeks spent filming The Big Trail. The starring part in a Western epic was a big break for a twenty-three year old kid, but Ford wasn't happy for him. As a matter of fact, when Wayne went over to say hello, Ford cut him dead. Then he did it again. A confused Wayne retreated.'


    In view of the above I think I am on solid ground by saying that there is no way that Wayne appeared as an extra in Up The River


    Regards


    Arthur

    Walk Tall - Talk Low

  • [/I]In view of the above I think I am on solid ground by saying that there is no way that Wayne appeared as an extra in Up The River


    Regards


    Arthur


    Having said that Arthur,
    how is it then Duke appeared in


    Born Reckless(1930)
    Men Without Women (1930)


    Unless they were made before The Big Trail!

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England



  • Well Eyman did not even get JW AGE right "twenty-three year old kid"

    The point I keep making about basic inaccuracies in MOST of the books written about JW

    Elly

    Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind



  • Unless they were made before The Big Trail!



    Hi Keith

    and here in is another dilemma!!

    WE DO NOT KNOW PRODUCTION DATES

    so it is very difficult to assume things from release dates.

    I think the reason the first meeting of JW with Ford is often said to be 1928 is because that is the RELEASE date of Mother Machree.

    HOWEVER, we KNOW that production on this film started September 1926

    Elly

    Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind

  • Hi Elly and Kieth


    I agree with you about release dates but Men Without Women with a release date of Jan 31st 1930 and Born Reckless of May 11th 1930 would appear to easily pre date the Big Trail which according to Fred Landesman, was shot between April and July 1930 with a release date of October 24th 1939.


    As the Big Trail was shot during that three month period in the Fox Studios at Culver City, Yuma, Arizona, Sequoia National Park, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Tetons Park; Jackson Hole, Wyoming: and Moiese, Montana I would think that Wayne was busy travelling around the United States at the time


    Regards


    Arthur

    Walk Tall - Talk Low

  • Hi


    Thinking about the age Duke born 26th May 1907 by May 1930 he would be celebrating his 23rd birthday. With the Big Trail being shot between April and July it is concievable that Duke turned up on the Ford lot just after his birthday.


    It makes a good detective puzzle.


    Regards


    Arthur

    Walk Tall - Talk Low



  • Hi Arthur

    Yes a good point about his birthday, he could well have been 23.

    thanks for pointing that out.

    Be who you are & say what you feel Because those who mind dont matter & those who matter dont mind

  • Hi Jim'


    With the numbers of people around during the late twenties and early thirties dropping even more rapidly than ever more due to Tempus Fugit I would think that meeting any of the criteria you have set would be unlikely in the extreme.


    Thinking seriously though, I feel that what we can or have to do is follow the route started so well by Elly and although I share her distrust of hacks trying to make easy money by going down the same route of repeating tired out stories, if enough of us research the more respectable authors and books and, and there are some out there, which will enable us to discuss among ourselfs bits and pieces picked up by this means. We might go someway towards completing a reasonably good history.


    For example although the actual date that Up The River began shooting is unknown, what is known is that shooting lasted seventeen days and that Spencer Tracy was appearing on the New York stage in the play 'The Last Mile' and was given two weeks leave of absence to appear in Ford's picture.


    With operating delays in scripting etc Tracy shook Ford by refusing to extend that leave of absence.


    As I said yesterday it might make a good detective story or even a massive jigsaw puzzle but I believe we have the sufficiently motivated and able people to undertake this after all this motivation is what makes this board so superior.


    Regards


    Arthur

    Walk Tall - Talk Low