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  • ‘Brannigan’ also has the added bonus of Richard Attenborough in the cast. Who can forget his, er, unforgettable performance in that wonderful End of Empire film ‘Guns at Batasi’?

  • ‘Brannigan’ also has the added bonus of Richard Attenborough in the cast. Who can forget his, er, unforgettable performance in that wonderful End of Empire film ‘Guns at Batasi’?

    I wonder how Attenborough got along with Wayne, considering he said he regarded James Stewart as too right-wing?

    • Official Post

    Attenborough and Wayne got along just fine. They had an admiration for each other. Many people in the business were leery of working with Wayne because of his strong political beliefs. But once they met and got to know him, they almost unanimously were glad they did. Kirk Douglas and Wayne were far apart on political leanings, but got along great. Mark Rydell, the director of The Cowboys, was worried about working with Duke. But he found himself getting along great with him. People can separate their political beliefs from their friendship with other people. I, for one, have always done so As long as they don't push their ideas on me, I have no problem getting along.


    Mark

  • With only a few exceptions…I have no problem admiring those of different political or religious beliefs for their talent and work ethic. If they’re successful at their chosen field more power to them.

    "It was me...I shot Liberty Valance."

    • New
    • Official Post

    On February 6, 1974 McQ was released.

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    McQ stands out among the modern cop dramas crafted by John Wayne during the 1970s. Wayne portrays McQ, an upright Seattle police officer committed to rooting out corruption and drug-dealing elements within his own department. His approach mirrors the iconic Dirty Harry style, a role Wayne had declined a few years prior.


    In the film, John Wayne introduced American audiences to the MAC 10 submachine gun, complete with a formidable suppressor. His character McQ resides on a boat, with John Wayne's own boat used to film several scenes.


    McQ boasts a pair of remarkable car chases executed by the uncredited Hal Needham. Notably, Needham risked his life during the filming of the climactic stunt, driving a car equipped with a black powder cannon to achieve a flip without the use of ramps.


    The movie's screenplay was co-authored by Lawrence Roman, known for his work on the western samurai film Red Sun (1971), also featuring Charles Bronson; and the Japanese samurai film Toshirô Mifune, sometimes dubbed the Japanese counterpart of John Wayne.