General "RIP" announcements that might be of interest

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  • Hi


    Announced yesterday that Clive Dunne has just died aged 92.
    Probably not very well known in the states but a member of the hugely popularcomedy series Dad's Army about the war time Home Guard


    His favourite saying was 'They don't like it up em'


    Regards


    Arthur

    Walk Tall - Talk Low

    Edited once, last by arthurarnell: misspelling ().

  • WARD BOND "saddled up" and headed out 52 years ago today. I always write a little piece on him for this the anniversary of his death 11/5/1960. This year, I was guest author on Speakeasy.


    Article is here if you want to read it. Kristina had some great stuff on the Classics also. Feel free to comment...good or bad....have to learn somehow.


    http://hqofk.wordpress.com/2012/11/05/wagon-master/ Keith


    I live 8 miles away from his birthplace and boyhood home. The park there is named after him and there's a nice plaque outside of the home.

    "I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them" It may be time worn, but it's the best life-creed I know.

  • Got an email from someone else who lives there. Seems they still have a celebration for him every year?


    After seeing the Speakeasy article, one blogger accepted my offer of correcting some of his piece on Ward....even gave him some info he didn't have. Here is his article with MOST of the corrections and additions....also today's front page of Speakeasy highlights his comment on my article:
    http://www.americancowboychronicles.com/search?q=Ward+bond




    And here is the first page of today’s Speakeasy featuring his comment:
    [COLOR= ]paniolotom commented on Wagon Master (1950). [/COLOR]
    in response to kristina:
    [INDENT] [COLOR= ] [/COLOR]
    By far the most popular post on my blog is this one, on the life of WARD BOND. Not a day’s gone by since that someone searching for Ward-related info hasn’t come upon that piece. The post also brought a frequent commenter who’s become a great person to know, and so I’m pleased to host this guest [...]
    [/INDENT] Keith, I love your article on Ward Bond. Since he was one of the greats that I still enjoy watching, it means a lot to me that you took the time to help me with my article on Ward Bond. It is all about getting it right, isn't it? You are a great gal! A fine writer. Much thanks!
    Looks like I may be learning....little by little. KEITH

    God, she reminds me of me! DUKE


  • Unfortunately, no, they do not have a celebration for him. But, his name and image are prominently displayed around town. Seems his family was here for quite a while, and one of his relatives (a cousin or uncle I think) was considered quite the war hero around here.

    "I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them" It may be time worn, but it's the best life-creed I know.

  • Deborah Raffin dies at 59; actress was also a force in audio books
    By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times November 21, 2012, 7:34 p.m.


    Deborah Raffin, a film actress, veteran of television miniseries and entrepreneur whose company, Dove Books-on-Tape, became a major force in the audio book industry, died Wednesday of leukemia at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. She was 59.
    She was diagnosed with the blood cancer about a year ago, said her brother, William.
    The blond, California-born actress first came to attention in the mid-1970s playing "pretty girl" roles in movies such as "Forty Carats" with Liv Ullman and "Once Is Not Enough," based on the salacious novel by Jacqueline Susann.
    She later tackled more substantial parts in television miniseries, playing legendary actress Brooke Hayward in "Haywire" (1980) and a businesswoman in "Noble House" (1988), based on the James Clavell saga of love and intrigue in Hong Kong.
    In the mid-1980s, she and her then-husband, Michael Viner, launched Dove as a hobby in the garage of their Coldwater Canyon home, but it blossomed into a multimillion-dollar business with a mix of high- and low-brow titles, from Sidney Sheldon's bestseller "The Naked Face" to physicist Stephen W. Hawking's opus on the cosmos, "A Brief History of Time," which was Dove's first bestseller.
    "I enjoy acting," Raffin told the Riverside Press-Enterprise in 1996, "but I've never been driven to just act. I've always had a desire to produce, to be in control of my own destiny, to be able to find material and develop it."
    The daughter of Trudy Marshall, a contract player at 20th Century Fox in the 1940s, and Philip Raffin, a meat broker and restaurateur, she was born in Los Angeles on March 13, 1953, and grew up in Beverly Hills and Bel-Air. After graduating from University High School, she attended L.A. Valley College and was in her second year there when she was discovered in an elevator by a talent agent.
    She met Viner, a music producer, on a blind date in 1974 and married him four months later. They launched Dove Books-on-Tape in 1985 and later expanded in book publishing and movie and television production.
    The books-on-tape venture had its origins in a backgammon game in which novelist Sidney Sheldon had lost $8,000 to Viner. Viner did not want to take the money and arranged instead to produce two of Sheldon's bestsellers as audio books. The name of the company was inspired by Raffin's 1974 film "The Dove," which was her second movie and co-starred Joseph Bottoms.
    Her job in the audio books company was lining up performers such as Burt Reynolds, Elliott Gould, Roger Moore and Ruby Dee. Among the first tapes she and her husband produced were "Anatomy of an Illness" and "The Healing Heart," the nonfiction bestsellers by their neighbor Norman Cousins. They were read by Jason Robards Jr. and William Conrad.
    Raffin also compiled celebrities' Christmas anecdotes for a 1990 book, "Sharing Christmas," which raised money for groups serving the homeless. It included stories from Margaret Thatcher, Kermit the Frog and Mother Teresa, whose contribution Raffin obtained by traveling to the Nobel Prize winner's mission in Calcutta.
    Raffin and Viner sold the company in 1997 after some ill-timed expansion efforts and controversies stemming from some of the more sensational book projects favored by Viner. These included two books by figures in the O.J. Simpson murder case, including Faye Resnick's "Nicole Brown Simpson: The Diary of a Life Interrupted" (1994).
    Raffin's marriage to Viner ended in divorce in 2005. (He died of cancer in 2009.) In addition to her brother, William, of Malibu, Raffin is survived by a sister, Judy Holston, and a daughter, Taylor Rose Viner, both of Brentwood.
    Services will be held at 1 p.m. Sunday at Hillside Memorial Park in Culver City.
    Through Dove, Raffin and Viner also promoted American movies in China, where the actress was a major star thanks to the popularity there of her early TV movie "Nightmare in Badham County" (1976), an exploitation flick about two coeds whose car breaks down in a small Southern town.
    On a visit to the country in the early 1980s, Raffin's Chinese fans reacted to her by pointing and shouting "nightmare, nightmare, nightmare."
    "It's funny now," she told the Orange County Register in 1988, "but it wasn't funny then."
    [email protected]

  • Mr Food died. I liked him.


    Art Ginsburg, who as "Mr. Food" demonstrated recipes and cooking tips in 90-second segments for millions of TV viewers over more than 30 years, died Wednesday of cancer, a company official said.


    Ginsburg, 81, died at his home in Weston, Florida, said Howard Rosenthal, an executive at Ginsberg's Florida-based Mr. Food Brand.


    Ginsburg, whose syndicated "Mr. Food" segments were shown on more than 125 television stations nationwide as of June, was known to enthusiastically sign off with his signature phrase, "Ooh, it's so good!"


    "What you saw on TV was how Art was off TV," Rosenthal said.


    Ginsburg's "commitment to anyone-can-do recipes and passion for helping others made him well-loved among his peers and among television viewers and website visitors," a message on the "Mr. Food" website said. "He was one of the first television celebrity chefs and paved a road for many who came after him."


    Ginsburg worked as a butcher and owned a catering business before debuting a cooking segment on a TV talk show in upstate New York in 1975.


    He began self-syndicating a 90-second "Mr. Food" TV segment to nine television markets in 1980. King World Productions -- now CBS Television Distribution -- began syndicating him in 1982, his company's website says.
    He established his own company, which by 1994 had a TV studio, a test kitchen and publishing offices in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. His company has produced more than 50 cookbooks by 2009.


    http://www.cnn.com/2012/11/21/…nsberg-mr-food/index.html

  • To me Larry Hagman was an icon of television history! - Maybe I was not the real Dallas-fan, but like many, many other people in Austria I watched most of the episodes of Dallas as it was on air for the first time. As the Austrian TV-station started airing the Denver Clan, it never could beat Dallas! And I still remember the Dallas episodes that were filmed in my hometown Vienna...

    I was (and still I am) a great fan of I dream of Jeannie! The show was on air in Austria in the early seventies as American astronauts flew to the moon. Everyone was crazy for rockets and astronauts at that time and the show was part of our culture. I never missed an episode of I dream of Jeannie as a child, and now I own the whole series on DVD. After having a bad day it is still a lot of fun to watch Major Nelson and his Jeannie, and sometimes I wish I could have a Jeannie in a bottle too!

    Thank You, Larry Hagman, for all the fun You brought to our lifes! I never will forget Tony Nelson and his Jeannie...

    "Never apologize. It´s a sign of weakness."

  • Boxer Hector 'Macho' Camacho dies days after being shot in head


    http://www.latimes.com/news/ob…-20121124,0,4143557.story


    The family decided to pull the plug on him because he was clinically brain dead according to the news last night. I got to see him box here in Corpus long before he was famous--and he was good--REAL good. I Hope they catch that SoB who shot him.


    Also, Rest in Peace Larry. Doggone it--another great gone :(

    Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..

  • Saw him box when in his prime....bunch of us went. He had a unique style. We went in against him and came out glad that he won.


    The toll taken on most boxers is enormous. Keith


    The family decided to pull the plug on him because he was clinically brain dead according to the news last night. I got to see him box here in Corpus long before he was famous--and he was good--REAL good. I Hope they catch that SoB who shot him.


    Also, Rest in Peace Larry. Doggone it--another great gone :(

    God, she reminds me of me! DUKE

  • Saw him box when in his prime....bunch of us went. He had a unique style. We went in against him and came out glad that he won.


    The toll taken on most boxers is enormous. Keith


    He did have a neat style. I wish I could have seen him more than once. Same thing goes fro the guy who is known as "Jake the Snake." I saw him live in CC I dont know how many years ago? and he is the guy who started it all using chairs as weapons and bashing other wrestlers with them.

    Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..