Haunted Gold (1932)

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  • HAUNTED GOLD


    DIRECTED BY MACK V. WRIGHT
    PRODUCED BY LEONARD SCHLESINGER/ SID ROGELL
    WARNER BROS


    Photo with the courtesy of lasbugas


    INFORMATION FROM IMDb


    Plot Summary
    John Mason returns to the Sally Ann mine to claim his half share.
    Janet Cater also returns although her father lost his half share to Joe Ryan.
    Ryan and his gang are also there to get the gold.
    A mysterious Phantom is also present.
    Mason's plan to expose Ryan as an outlaw and to force him
    to turn his share to Janet works.
    But when distracted by the Phantom, John is made a prisoner by the gang.
    Summary written by Maurice VanAuken


    Full Cast
    John Wayne .... John Mason
    Sheila Terry .... Janet Carter
    Harry Woods .... Joe Ryan
    Erville Alderson .... Tom Benedict
    Otto Hoffman .... Simon, Benedict's Servant
    Martha Mattox .... Mrs. Herman
    Blue Washington .... Clarence Washington Brown
    Duke the Horse .... Duke, John's Horse (as Duke the Miracle Horse)
    Tom Bay .... Tom (uncredited)
    Bob Burns .... Bob (uncredited)
    Ben Corbett .... Henchman Ben (uncredited)
    Jim Corey .... Henchman Ed (uncredited)
    Charles Le Moyne .... Cowhand (uncredited)
    Ken Maynard .... (archive footage) (uncredited)
    Bud Osborne .... Henchman Bud (uncredited)
    Tarzan .... (archive footage) (uncredited)
    Blackjack Ward .... Henchman (uncredited)
    Slim Whitaker .... Henchman Slim (uncredited)
    Mack V. Wright .... Henchman Mack (uncredited)


    Writing Credits
    Adele S. Buffington story and continuity


    Cinematography
    Nicholas Musuraca


    Trivia
    * The statue of the Maltese Falcon, later used in the Humphrey Bogart classic The Maltese Falcon (1941)
    can be seen in a scene where the film's heroine Sheila Terry is playing the organ.


    * Warner Bros. salvaged long shots of silent Ken Maynard films and used them in this film. Thus, many of the long shots of John Wayne are actually shots of Maynard from earlier films.


    Filming Locations
    Iverson Ranch, Chatsworth, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Lasky Mesa, West Hills, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Sonora, California, USA
    Warner Ranch, Calabasas, California, USA
    Yuma, Arizona, USA

    Watch the Movie

    Haunted Gold

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 20 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • Haunted Gold is a 1932 American Western film starring John Wayne.


    This is the 1st. of 6 films Duke made with Warner Bros, as re-makes of some
    silent films, that Ken Maynard had made.
    This one being a re-make of 1929 film The Phantom City.


    These Duke versions were made, to use up unused film, that WB had,
    featuring Ken Maynard and his miracle horse.
    They brought in Duke and Duke! The Wonder Horse,
    and substituted them into the films!!
    If you look closely, you can spot the difference,
    between the two actors.
    Even the two horses, are noticeably different.


    It opened at the Strand Theatre in New York to
    "Action Gallops across the Screen"


    With Duke, was Sheila Terry, she's a real beauty,
    and she was another one of his earlier female co-stars,
    of which he had, chemistry.
    Blue Washington, added some great comedy,
    in this captivating story of a ghost house!!
    Great mine shaft scene, and some good stunt-work, Duke
    fighting in a suspended mine bucket!!! WOW!!!


    I enjoyed this series, and they remain favourites,
    as they were amongst the first VHS, I ever bought.


    1932hauntedgold3.jpg


    User Review

    Quote

    "Author: Norm Vogel
    This western reminds me of an "old house film".....a ghost town with a "real" ghost! Secret panels, shadows on the walls,
    eyes peering thru slits in the walls, etc.
    It also gives Blue Washington the chance for some great "scared reaction" comedy (ala' Mantan Moreland or Willie Best).
    I don't much care for westerns, but the "supernatural" elements in this film make it worth watching! "*

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 8 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • Hi Keith, I saw this one a long time ago and have it on VHS but wish it were on DvD. Also, I think Blue Washington did an excellent job of being the movies "scardy cat." The guy made me laugh till I was green in the face.

    Es Ist Verboten Mit Gefangenen In Einzelhaft Zu Sprechen..

  • Quote

    Originally posted by The Ringo Kid@Feb 2 2006, 01:31 PM
    Hi Keith, I saw this one a long time ago and have it on VHS but wish it were on DvD.

    [snapback]26368[/snapback]


    Ringo,


    We haven't seen this movie, but if you would be willing to send it to us, we could check out our new capture card and DVD burner on the 'puter, and make you a DVD for you and for us at the same time, and of course return your VHS copy. :D


    Chester :newyear:

  • By an odd coincidence I bought this right before it is to be released on DVD. Well this certainly was different. Extremely silly, but entertaining. I enjoyed it even though I was sittng with the feeling that it was one of the worst movies I have ever seen. I guess the fact that they made it to use unused film explains a lot.


    Interesting to see how times have changed and espescially the Blue Washington character. Biography for Blue Washington explains what I'm talking about. This is one movie that would never have been made today.


    While I am posting in this forum I would like to thank you again, Keith, for all the work you put in to this forum. I hope you return, but if not at least you can see that these threads are being picked up again and we are reading them.


    Regards
    Popol Vuh


  • I can agree with this too. It was great job. It's a pity that there is no movie of the week descussion any more.
    As for Haunted Gold I have never seen it, but hope some day... I think it takes not too long, becouse now I have 84 movies.
    Regards,
    Senta :rolleyes:

  • The best JW b-western I´ve seen so far! Creepy occupants in the ghost town. Duke the horse is beautiful, and the better known Duke doesn´t look bad either.
    Has anybody seen the original Maynard movie? Some of his films seem to be around. Would be interesting to compare. If memory serves me, Duke is the same horse Maynard used earlier, by the name Tarzan

    I don't believe in surrenders.


  • Hi etsija,


    Hope this helps

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

  • Why they used a picture from Big Jim McLain I will never know.... But I thought this was the weakest of the 6 he did for WB, with Ride Him Cowboy being the best. Although I did like Clarence, I just wish that he would've been played straight instead of as a comedic relief like most blacks were at the time. But he had good presence and he deserved way better.

  • I had seen this a long time ago, I think , but watched it again today. I enjoyed it, it reminded me a little of a type of Scooby Doo Western Style adventure. Spooky town, spooky house, people sent mysterious letters, strange going ons. Even a ghost causing trouble, well,a phantom !!! Plenty of action, great level of creepiness from the supporting cast, too. Blue Washington, was good, and I agree that you wouldn't see this type of role being played today, for obvious reasons.....

    Duke saves JW from a certain death, hanging from the cable mining car after a good fight scene !!!


    Dee x

  • Why they used a picture from Big Jim McLain I will never know.... But I thought this was the weakest of the 6 he did for WB, with Ride Him Cowboy being the best. Although I did like Clarence, I just wish that he would've been played straight instead of as a comedic relief like most blacks were at the time. But he had good presence and he deserved way better.



    This was the 50s rerelease poster for the film, so they tried to fake everyone into thinking it was a new film.