Take Me Back to the FIFTIES!

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  • I guess it's all in one's perspective. My favorite decade, by far, was the Fifties, which I refer to as the "Golden Decade". Speaking for myself, I wish I could totally erase the Sixties from my memory.


    The sixties Flash movie was so much fun I went back and found this, for those who hanker for that marvelous decade of the Fifties. The Mrs. was born in '56, but says she remembers a lot of what is shown.


    Have a good time down this memory lane!!


    Chester :newyear:

  • Thanks, Jim. Brought back some good memories.

    I liked the manners, morals, movies and music of those days much more than what we have today.

    Some of my favorite Fifties music was Rhythm & Blues (Coasters, Drifters, many others from the old Atlantic label) and Doo-Wop. Plus, naturally, Elvis, Bobby Darin (remember "Splish Splash" and "Dream Lover"?) and their like.

    My favorite TV shows were the old Westerns, such as those Keith has posted on the board, and "The Honeymooners" with Jackie Gleason.

    And there were some wonderful films released back then - almost all without a single cuss word in them.

    Life was much slower and much, much simpler. There was no political correctness, no kids killing kids in school, teenage pregnancies were almost unheard of, people didn't lock their doors (either house or car) and gasoline never cost more than a quarter a gallon, often less. Ah, life was blissful then. :thumbs_up::thumbs_up::thumbs_up:

    De gustibus non est disputandum

  • More nostalgia!

    Course like I said the other day, wages back then were around $1.25 per hour for ordinary working people. (which was most everybody in my part of the country)

    I remember my very first job - my step-dad used his influence with some local oilfield types to get me a job as a roustabout on what they called a "pullin' unit" when I was about 14 (in 1952). The task of a pulling unit was to keep producing oil wells in good mechanical condition (so they'd keep producing with no problems). I was paid 95 cents an hour and as a rookie roustabout, usually drew the worst shifts (what they called the graveyard shift, from midnight until 8:00 AM). But in two years, I saved up enough to buy my first car at the age of 16 (which was when we could get a driver's license back then). It was a '47 Ford convertible coupe. I was the envy of all my friends in school and naturally, had my pick of the gals too. Those were the days.

    De gustibus non est disputandum

  • Course like I said the other day, wages back then were around $1.25 per hour for ordinary working people. (which was most everybody in my part of the country)

    I remember my very first job - my step-dad used his influence with some local oilfield types to get me a job as a roustabout on what they called a "pullin' unit" when I was about 14 (in 1952). The task of a pulling unit was to keep producing oil wells in good mechanical condition (so they'd keep producing with no problems). I was paid 95 cents an hour and as a rookie roustabout, usually drew the worst shifts (what they called the graveyard shift, from midnight until 8:00 AM



    Man, have times changed - just out of curiosity, I googled the term "pulling unit" to see what it would bring up. Found this ad wanting workers for a pulling unit (apparently they now call 'em workover rigs) in NM and west Texas that starts hands at $19. an hour. And based on experience, they can earn up to $24.50 per hour. If plain old roustabouts can earn that much nowadays, no wonder oil is selling at $140. per barrel.

    De gustibus non est disputandum

  • These are examples of what we called "pulling units". Besides the well service rig itself, there was nearly always what we roustabouts called a "dog house", which was a small (usually about 12' x 12') shed constructed of heavy-gauge metal, where the workers could take breaks, eat meals, sleep, etc. It was a rough life and the hands worked hard but in those days, it was usually a job almost anyone could get in the oilfields. It was considered an entry-level internship for oilfield workers who hoped to move on to the more prestigious positions of roughnecks and/or drillers, where the money was much better.

    But after a couple of years working at this, I decided the oilfields weren't for me and then joined the military, where I spent the next 25 years. I might have earned more money in the oilfields but it is dirty, dangerous work that can easily get you killed. (Of course, so can the military :stunned:)

    Most of my male relatives worked in and around the oilfields all their lives, But unless you work your way up into the higher and more responsible positions at companies associated with the oil business, there are no retirement/pension plans. Whereas my military pension, coupled with Social Security, provides a very comfortable living for the wife and me. We'll never be rich but we're far better off than millions of other people in this old world.

    De gustibus non est disputandum

  • The Fifties were a great time to be around. I used to go to Soho in London and listen to the up and coming bands of the time. The ones I enjoyed most were "The Shadows" although at the time they called themselves "The Drifters". They changed their name when the American group of the same name objected to them using "The Drifters". They were with Cliff Richard right from the start and appeared on Jack Good's TV programme "Oh Boy". Also you could walk the streets at night, after going to the flicks and you missed the last bus home, without any problems. Petrol was priced at around 2/6d a gallon. As an apprentice plumber I wasn't on a good wage but was able to keep up with the "Teddy Boy" look with tailored suits and velvet collars. I met my wife in 1958 and we both agree that going to the dance hall was very enjoyable with very little trouble.
    Regards
    Redcap

    RACMP - For the troops With the troops

  • The 50's are special to me because that is when I was a wee child. I agree on the morals and just everyday common courtesy and morals! I wish we could go back to that part..

    I won't be wronged-I won"t be insulted-I won't be laid a hand on. :cowboy:

  • although i just missed out on the 50s i love that decade - the music, jerry lee lewis, paul anka, bobby darin, and frank sinatra especially, the clothes, escpecially the teddy boy look, films, tv progs, (casey jones and bewitched - or were they the 60s?) hamburger bars, comics, and the strong moral ethos running thru everything - so different from today

    "Sorry don t get it done, Dude" (Rio Bravo)


    Hooked on The Duke

  • Had an interesting table talk with the In-laws about the 50's. Anyone remember John Henry Faulk?
    He was the radio guy accused of communist leaning and blacklisted so CBS fired him. I finally got his book to read because my Wife's grandfather was the grocery store owner from Syracuse who was named in the 1962 lawsuit against AWARE, Inc.
    My Mo-Inlaw insists her Father never could be what Faulk's book or the press say, but I have most of his book collection and it is conservative and tight as a penny pinchers wallet. He wrote in many of his books and he had no love for a communist. The ACLU hated him, his personal letters were intense verbal battles with their lawyers.

  • although i just missed out on the 50s i love that decade - the music, jerry lee lewis, paul anka, bobby darin, and frank sinatra especially, the clothes, escpecially the teddy boy look, films, tv progs, (casey jones and bewitched - or were they the 60s?) hamburger bars, comics, and the strong moral ethos running thru everything - so different from today


    I remember all of these
    but sorry Jeff not this man.


    Had an interesting table talk with the In-laws about the 50's. Anyone remember John Henry Faulk?

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

  • John Henry Faulk was the poster boy for the end of McCarthyism. Joe McCarthy is the senator who went after suspected communists in Government, Hollywood, and Acedemia in the 50's.

  • One of the things I remember from the fifties that I really miss, is visiting Yosemite National Park. It was so much less crowded back then, and enjoyable.

    In fact, all of California was in that category. :cry2:

    Chester :newyear:



    The whole durned world was in "that" category. Wish it still was. We just have too many people in this world.

    All the environuts complain about air and water pollution but what they should be complaining about is people pollution because people cause all the other pollutions.

    De gustibus non est disputandum