Books on Duke

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  • I recently ordered John Wayne:American, The Man behind the myth and The Life and times of John Wayne, are they any good?


    I really enjoyed reading all three, but, I would have to say that while John Wayne American, and The Life and Times of John Wayne are the best of the three. Munn's book, while enjoyable, does tend to lean a little toward the sensationalistic at times. Still a good read though. I think you'll enjoy all three of them.

    "I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them" It may be time worn, but it's the best life-creed I know.

  • The Irish Duke-John Wayne:American, The Man behind the myth.
    I just finished this book and enjoyed it.

    "A people that values their Privileges above it's Principles. Soon looses both." Dwight Eisenhower

  • Anybody know anything about a book called John Wayne Treasures: Featuring a collection of Memorabilia from the life of The Duke by Randy Roberts/ David Welky.

  • Anybody know anything about a book called John Wayne Treasures: Featuring a collection of Memorabilia from the life of The Duke by Randy Roberts/ David Welky.


    Now profiled


    Duke's Books


    JOHN WAYNE:Treasures
    Randy W. Roberts (2013)



    John Wayne is the quintessential American icon.
    He embodied the definition of the American cowboy, soldier, and rugged individualist.
    Duke’s extraordinary rise to fame—from hauling furniture around studio lots to becoming
    one of the most famous actors in the world—is chronicled in this handsome illustrated volume.
    On-set and behind-the-scenes photographs and vintage movie posters are included,
    as well as ten pieces of removable memorabilia such as an excerpt from his high school yearbook,
    his 1943 application to join the army, proof sheets and storyboards from his most well-known movies, and much more.
    With thanks to Paula

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 2 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • This is not a book about Duke but it seems he will appear in it frequently.


    “Cowboy Stuntman: From Olympic Gold to the Silver Screen,” written with Mike Cox of Austin.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03…writes-a-memoir.html?_r=0


    May, thanks, Just remembered, I did profile this one
    here


    Books: On Pals Of The Saddle


    COWBOY STUNTMEN:
    From Olympic Gold to the Silver Screen

    James Garner (Foreword), Dean Smith (Author), Mike Cox (Author) Texas Tech Press,U.S. (2013)



    Dean starts with his real life ancestry in Texas, growing up with horses and watching westerns on Saturday afternoons.
    He excels at track and wins a gold medal in the 1952 Olympics, but always wanted to be a part of western movies
    and through a mutual and famous friend becomes stunt double for Dale Robertson on "Tales of Wells Fargo".
    Through a series of meetings and networking, he meets John Wayne in 1959 and is hired on "The Alamo".
    He goes on to perform in nine more Wayne films and becomes a friend for life with Duke's family.
    He relives several exciting and humorous experiences which I won't spoil here.
    There are many great photos and a filmography.

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

    Edited 3 times, last by ethanedwards ().

  • Dean Smith is one of the legendary stuntmen. He was chosen to double Ben Johnson in Cheyenne Autumn -- Ben had broken his foot and couldn't do the leap onto the back of the horse Harry Carey, Jr. was riding (Dobe was not doubled). So that's Dean Smith running up to the horse and leaping onto it. ;)

  • Read an interesting book, The Old West in Fact and Film by Jeremy Agnew. He said big men weren't cowboys because they were too hard on horses. He made one big error. He said Willa Cather wrote Cheyenne Autumn.

  • Read an interesting book, The Old West in Fact and Film by Jeremy Agnew. He said big men weren't cowboys because they were too hard on horses.


    I can confirm that "too hard on horses" thing. Years ago, my son and I were someplace where there was an opportunity for horseback riding. They were easily able to saddle my son, but they took one look at me (6'4" and 275+ pounds) and said they didn't have a big enough horse for me. Needless to say, I got to wait while my son went riding.


    Chester :newyear:

  • I can confirm that "too hard on horses" thing. Years ago, my son and I were someplace where there was an opportunity for horseback riding. They were easily able to saddle my son, but they took one look at me (6'4" and 275+ pounds) and said they didn't have a big enough horse for me. Needless to say, I got to wait while my son went riding.


    Chester :newyear:


    You could have rode Roman style like they did in Rio Grand, Jim. That would have been only 137 pounds per horse. ;)


    Mark

    "I couldn't go to sleep at night if the director didn't call 'cut'. "

  • This is probably already under discussion somewhere else on the site, but...has anyone seen this newest version of "let's try to trash John Wayne as much as we can, entitled - When The Legend Became Fact - The True Life of John Wayne?"


    It's written by some guy named Richard Douglas Jensen, who claims to be an acclaimed author, veteran film actor (yet no film credits of him exist on IMDb...), and nationally known defense attorney...


    Can someone please shed some light on this for me? He claims he idolized JW growing up in the 40's, and wanted to work with him in the 70's, but simply EVERYONE he spoke with during that time told him that he didn't, because he was an absolute tyrant on the set, and made life miserable for everyone. He supposedly spoke with ONLY those who worked with Duke, so they "knew" what they were they were talking about...This flies in the face of EVERYONE that I know in L.A. that worked with JW personally, and knew folks that worked with JW.


    I just can't believe this guy talked to people who were "in the know" about the real situation about Duke's life. I'm not going to go into all that he's claiming, and no, I haven't read the book yet, but he's claiming (among several other disgusting things), that Duke beat all three of his wives and all the kids...I'm sorry, but I just don't buy it.


    I would appreciate some feed back. I know that JW was far from perfect, but this smells of a smear job with a side of money grabbing...


    OK...I did a little more research, and I discovered that he wrote the book about Ben Johnson that everyone like called "The Nicest Fella," so I'm at least willing to give him a chance...

  • Hi Russ,
    Yep, we know about this one and here is our review on it.
    Posted here last year,
    but thanks for your insight on it.


    Duke's Books-Part Two


    WHEN THE LEGEND BECAME THE FACT:
    The True Life of John Wayne

    Richard Douglas Jensen. (2012)



    When The Legend Became Fact - The True Life of John Wayne by Richard Douglas Jensen is the most comprehensive deconstruction of the mythology surrounding the life of America’s favorite actor to date. With decades of research and insight, Jensen lifts the veil of public relations half-truths and exposes the reality of the man who is still, 30 years after his death, the iconic Western movie hero and hero of red state America. Jensen proves that the public John Wayne was very different from the private man, who struggled with severe alcoholism, chronic infidelity, self-esteem and personal demons that often made life hell for his wives and children. The book painstakingly recounts the triumphs and tragedies of the life of John Wayne – who rose from abject poverty to become the world’s most famous movie star – and creates a portrait of a man haunted by a childhood of abuse; a man conflicted by his own definition of masculinity; a man fighting to control his own rage and his propensity for violence; a man who committed domestic violence against all three of his wives and his children; and a man haunted by and driven to overcome his fear of failure, poverty and ridicule.

    Best Wishes
    Keith
    London- England

  • Not everyone liked the book about Ben Johnson. I know it's been covered in other topics, but the book was not worth the time it took to read. It was strictly a cut and paste job consisting of information available on the internet.
    I doubt that the demonstrated lazy quality of research has improved any on the Wayne book.



    We deal in lead, friend.